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Thread: Barge Glue

  1. #1
    Senior Member dr_wu002's Avatar
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    Barge Glue

    While hiking to Monroe (via. Huntingtons -- way overhyped trail) Swamp, JF and I were discussing the so-called properties of a mysterious substance called Barge Glue. Supposedly people use it as some sort of super stick substance to repair hiking gear. One reports even says they used it on Apollo 13 to tow the space craft when it was damaged by a meteorite. None of us had really ever heard of what it actually is. After some deliberation we concluded that it must be made of a certain gooey secretion combined with sea water, however when I mentioned this later at the restaurant in mixed company I was immediately treated with revulsion like some sort of anti-social ying yang, a pervert at the dinner table especially when I motioned how to make up the sticky cement at the table, substituting sweat for the sea water.

    My question is, does anyone really know what this stuff is? We're basically back to square one concerning this stuff and if I can get some you bet I'll use it. Is it expensive? Gross? Commercially available? Edible? After ingesting 75,000 mg of Viagra on a dare over the weekend I'm not overly enthusiastic about eating weird things without prior knowledge of what it'll do to me afterwards. However, as a gear fixer, this stuff is just about touted to be the Holy Grail of glue... even better than Yuge Glue although I doubt anything will repair the patchy spots on my beard like a tub of the old Yuge Glue will. But Barge Glue is probably way cheaper and safer.

    -Dr. Wu
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  2. #2
    Banned Kevin Rooney's Avatar
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    I would consider it a contact cement, and is readily available on Amazon. It's made by the Quabaug Corporation. Some shoe repair shops might carry it also.

    I've used Barge, but there are better solutions - Gorilla glue seems to hold better over the long term.

  3. #3
    Senior Member dr_wu002's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Rooney View Post
    I would consider it a contact cement, and is readily available on Amazon. It's made by the Quabaug Corporation. Some shoe repair shops might carry it also.

    I've used Barge, but there are better solutions - Gorilla glue seems to hold better over the long term.
    Wow, we all thought it would be something much more exotic that I didn't even consider checking Amazon.

    In the Technical Details section is lists:

    Technical Details

    * 2 oz.
    * Ready to use for rubber, glass, cork, leather, wood, metal, etc.
    * Great for weather stripping, car doors, windows, leather goods, shoe repair
    * Replaces tiles and wall brackets


    I was expecting some more Herculean applications. But for $3.99 I guess you pretty much get what you paid for. Will this stuff remove giardia from your system and how much of it do you have to eat in order to do so?

    -Dr. Wu
    To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead.
    -Thomas Paine

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    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    I always knew it under the name "barge cement" and that it was used by cobblers for gluing rubber and leather. One specific use was to glue rubber outer soles to the mid-sole on boots.

    According to the directions on my tube of same, it is a contact cement. The directions say that it can be used on rubber, wood, glass, plastic (except vinyl), celluloid, ceramics, leather, cork, metal, plaster, paper, and concrete.

    Lots of Google hits: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&s...rge+ce&aqi=g10

    Doug

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    Senior Member dr_wu002's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul View Post
    The directions say that it can be used on rubber, wood, glass, plastic (except vinyl), celluloid, ceramics, leather, cork, metal, plaster, paper, and concrete.
    Since I am apparently not made from any of those things, for the most part, I assume that external and internal human applications are not recommended. How well will it fix my snow shoes in a bind?

    -Dr. Wu
    To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member MadRiver's Avatar
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    I always have a tube at the house. Works well.
    What do you mean he don't eat no meat? Ok, I'll do lamb.

  7. #7
    Banned Kevin Rooney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dr_wu002 View Post
    Since I am apparently not made from any of those things, for the most part, I assume that external and internal human applications are not recommended. How well will it fix my snow shoes in a bind?

    -Dr. Wu
    About the only one I'm aware of is the inhalation variety. If the tube/can is used in a closed space, and you strike a match - prepare for home restorations/renovations.

    As for fixing the snowshoes - think duct tape/nylon ties/Gorilla glue. Not Barge.

  8. #8
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    Barge Cement

    I use Barge Cement frequently for repairing boot soles. I don't use it for much else. They sell it at Campmor, Ragged and other sporting goods stores.

    A few things to keep in mind... Read the directions as it is not just and apply and squeeze cement. You clean and degrease each of the two sides. Then apply and let partially dry. Then press together and clamp. As mentioned ventilation is important - perhaps more or equally to protect brain cells then prevent explosions.

    I use sandpaper to clean and rough the surfaces much like repairing bicycle tubes. For clamping I usually insert a small board inside the boot and clamp this board to a 2x4 under the sole of the boot with a big clamp. Then I apply the cement and cover the area with plastic (I find the liners to cerial boxes to work well) Then wrap the area with an elastic to act as a clamp. I used to use a piece of latex tubing but switched to one of those elastic exercise ribbons. I also heard someone else mention using some stretch film such as the stuff used to wrap pallet loads.

    Another pointer. Once the tube is open the cap does not provide enough of a barrier to prevent the cement from drying out between repairs so put a single layer of aluminum foil under the cap to preserve the life until the next repair. (just cover the opening and screw the cap over it) This works for caulking tubes too.
    Last edited by John H Swanson; 03-09-2012 at 02:39 PM.
    "I've been kicked by the wind, robbed by the sleet, had my head snowed in, and I'm still on my feet, and I'm still,...willin"

  9. #9
    Senior Member dr_wu002's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Rooney View Post
    About the only one I'm aware of is the inhalation variety. If the tube/can is used in a closed space, and you strike a match - prepare for home restorations/renovations.
    I don't know what about this post screams fatality to me but I'm sure it's there. I certainly won't prescribe it to my patients to eliminate giardia.

    -Dr. Wu
    To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead.
    -Thomas Paine

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    Quote Originally Posted by dr_wu002 View Post
    While hiking to Monroe (via. Huntingtons -- way overhyped trail) Swamp, JF and I were discussing the so-called properties of a mysterious substance called Barge Glue.
    Hey Wu, I remember that you were still talking on and on about Barge (and Gary M.) on the summit of Monroe and we told you all about it (Barge cement, that is), but I guess that you were not listening? Must have been the fog.

  11. #11
    Senior Member erugs's Avatar
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    "Barge 1. a flatbottomed vessel, usually without power and intended to be pushed or towed, for transporting freight or passengers...6. to intrude, interrupt, or interfere, esp. rudely or clumsily."

    Sounds like it would work on boots. We use Gorilla.

    "Gorilla ...2. an ugly brutish fellow. 3. Slang. a hoodlum or thug, esp. one who threatens or inflicts violence..."

    Much stronger.
    Ellen

    Volunteer Maintainer: East Pond Trail

    "Through winter-time we call on spring/And through the spring on summer call/And when abounding hedges ring/Declare that winter's best of all/And after that there's nothing good/Because the spring-time has not come... William Butler Yeats

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    I have never used Gorilla Glue for boots. So I appeciate and value the comments of others about its effectiveness.

    My one expereince with Gorilla Glue is that the glue in the bottle became hard and useless between uses. So, for me, it has to be really really good to justify the cost of getting one single use (or 6 months of use) from a bottle.
    "I've been kicked by the wind, robbed by the sleet, had my head snowed in, and I'm still on my feet, and I'm still,...willin"

  13. #13
    Banned Kevin Rooney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John H Swanson View Post
    I have never used Gorilla Glue for boots. So I appeciate and value the comments of others about its effectiveness.

    My one expereince with Gorilla Glue is that the glue in the bottle became hard and useless between uses. So, for me, it has to be really really good to justify the cost of getting one single use (or 6 months of use) from a bottle.
    John - It's good stuff (and there are less expensive look-alike alternatives) - I think the hardening problem is similar to what you cite with Barge.

    One downside of Gorilla glue is that the joint does swell slightly as the glue cures, so the more glue that is used the larger the gap. Another downside is that while it's incredibly strong, the joint doesn't have the inherent flexibility of a contact cement-type joint, such as Barge, so that has to be taken into consideration.

  14. #14
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Let's not forget shoe goo in this eclectic discussion of sticky substances.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  15. #15
    Senior Member dr_wu002's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiguy View Post
    Let's not forget shoe goo in this eclectic discussion of sticky substances.
    I blushed for a moment when I read "shoe goo" but then I realized you were talking about an actual product. Better luck next time, I guess...

    -Dr. Wu
    To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead.
    -Thomas Paine

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