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Thread: Incredibly odd development in the Geraldine Largay case

  1. #31
    Junior Member Rhody Seth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iAmKrzys View Post
    While reading a related thread on another forum I saw a post with a link to a paper on lost person behavior: http://www.smcmsar.org/downloads/Los...20Behavior.pdf The paper, at 30 pages, is a bit legthy but I found it quite interesting. .
    That was a good read. Thanks.

  2. #32
    Senior Member una_dogger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Rankin View Post
    I've heard that a lack of food can make people lose their mental faculties quickly. Just tossing that out there...
    Good point, and if she intended to be out that day and resupply, her cache was low.
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  3. #33
    Senior Member Ed'n Lauky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iAmKrzys View Post
    While reading a related thread on another forum I saw a post with a link to a paper on lost person behavior: http://www.smcmsar.org/downloads/Los...20Behavior.pdf The paper, at 30 pages, is a bit legthy but I found it quite interesting. It postulates that lost people basically go through 5 stages:



    Apparently, the paper is more that 15 years old and the author subsequently wrote a book titled "Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies and Why" that I am planning to put at the top of my reading list.
    You're right, that is an absolutely fascinating read. While reading it I was reminded of an anecdote I read about Davy Crockett, someone asked him if he ever got lost and he replied: 'No, but there was a time when I wasn't quite sure where I was for about three months.'
    I used to look at my dog and think 'If you were a little smarter you could tell me what your were thinking', and he'd look at me like he was saying 'If you were a little smarter I wouldn't have to'. Fred Jungclaus

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  4. #34
    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iAmKrzys View Post
    While reading a related thread on another forum I saw a post with a link to a paper on lost person behavior: http://www.smcmsar.org/downloads/Los...20Behavior.pdf The paper, at 30 pages, is a bit legthy but I found it quite interesting. It postulates that lost people basically go through 5 stages:



    Apparently, the paper is more that 15 years old and the author subsequently wrote a book titled "Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies and Why" that I am planning to put at the top of my reading list.
    I liked the part about 'bending the map'. I think the phenomenon happens outside of spatial reasoning as well. Denying the reality in which you live can have consequences depending on which aspect is distorted in your mind. The effect can be really sinister when someone believes they have an accurate understanding of reality, and doubling down when challenged on that view. Another person with another perspective might call them a liar, but as George says, "It's not a lie if you believe it." When it comes to political views, that distortion [hopefully] won't kill you, but in the woods 'bending the map' can.
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  5. #35
    Senior Member Brambor's Avatar
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    lack of food and especially fatigue. As we age... and this happens to different people at different ages ... we get certain levels of dementia. It is just a fact of life. The fact that Inchworm already was on occasions having issues staying on trail and getting disoriented already exposes certain level of dementia. It only gets worse. Sorry to break it to those who are too young to realize that. She probably had a difficult and demanding day, got fatigued and this exacerbated her condition. People who get affected have trouble performing much simpler tasks than orienteering when they are fatigued or when they are hungry or under stress - in some cases the condition reaches a stage when you don't need to be hungry or tired. It's just a fact of aging.
    Luck is where preparation meets opportunity.

  6. #36
    Senior Member Stan's Avatar
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    Just to set the record straight, aging is not for wimps. And, my observation is that there is a lot more wisdom than dementia in old people.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    It does not appear from the diary entries I read that she was not in control of her mental faculties.

    Like everything else, aging has its ups and downs. There are still almost all good days at 56 for this hiker. But issues can pop up suddenly (stroke), or slowly (cancer). I used to see aging as a long slow slide, but that doesn't mean I can't try to hit the brakes.
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  8. #38
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    I was fortunate to meet George and Inch, about a month before she missed her rendezvous with George . Saw them twice, actually.

    First meeting was when George picked her up on the Auto Road at the trail junction at 2 mile park. He was picking her up and taking her into Gorham, where they had lodging for 3 nights. They stopped on the way out, we chatted. Inch was bright and bubbly, George was proud and all smiles. Considering the lack of cell service in Pinkham, they had timed their meeting within minutes. I asked if they needed any suggestions for shopping, sightseeing or restaurants, George smiled widely, thanked me, and said he had already done his homework on that and went down through a punchlist -- spot on, he even knew where they were going to church on Sunday, and that it was directly across the street from their lodging. He had done his homework. Inch was excited for hot showers, laundry, a pool, a hot tub, a real bed, restaurant meals and only asked if I could recommend a salon where she could get a haircut and a pedicure.

    Inch was solo at that point on the trail.

    When they returned on Monday, to get Inch back up to the trail intersection. we spoke again and both of them thanked me profusely ( for not much, really), declared that Gorham was a great spot for a rest off the trail, said they found everything they wanted and were impressed with the helpfulness of the people in town. I asked where their next planned off-trail rendezvous would be, and again, George had it all planned, lodging, meals, resupply and laundry. He even knew where to buy pie on Rt 26 in Newry.

    Perhaps you cannot get much of a sense of people in 2 10 minute meetings. I thought I had, and was extremely impressed that the homework HAD been done. My sense was that this was a team-- she did the hiking, and he managed the logistics, right down to church services and pie.

    Inch truly and deeply trusted in George. It doesn't in the least surprise me that she believed had to stay put where she was, trusting that the cell phone messages would work, and even though she was lost, George would make the rescue happen. They believed in each other, very very strongly.

    That was a tough summer for AT hikers in northern New England. There were reports of a menacing trail stalker targeting women , there were many many warnings about Giardia and Norovirus, all water flow was below normal, and it was danged hot. George and Inch were completely committed to what they were doing, how they were doing it, and were supremely, happily confident that they each had their ducks all in a row and it was working well for them.

    That it all went so horribly wrong surely has many lessons. I guess the bottom line for me in all this is-- her PLB could have made very quick work of her rescue, and it belonged on her person, not left behind in a motel room.

    SHE had not planned to get lost, but THEY had planned for an emergency. Trust in what and how you plan is only as valuable the diligence with which you execute the plan.

  9. #39
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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  10. #40
    Senior Member Ed'n Lauky's Avatar
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    Very interesting and I thought well done. Thanks.
    I used to look at my dog and think 'If you were a little smarter you could tell me what your were thinking', and he'd look at me like he was saying 'If you were a little smarter I wouldn't have to'. Fred Jungclaus

    Some of our greatest historical and artistic treasures we place with curators in museums; others we take for walks. Roger Caras

    100/100 NEHH with Duffy
    48/48 NH 4000 Winter Ed with Duffy and Lauky
    48 X 4 including 1 winter Lauky
    48 X 6 Ed
    12 X 12 Belknaps with Lauky

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