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Thread: Mt Lafayette Rescue on Wednesday

  1. #1
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    Mt Lafayette Rescue on Wednesday

    http://www.wcax.com/story/34520848/s...shire-mountain

    Probably not a great day for a hike. It was snowing from mid day on. The forecast was wavering a bit on the exact forecast for the area up until the AM so I expect it was a case someone driving down and hoping the forecast was wrong.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-mountain.html

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    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    http://www.wcax.com/story/34520848/s...shire-mountain

    Probably not a great day for a hike. It was snowing from mid day on. The forecast was wavering a bit on the exact forecast for the area up until the AM so I expect it was a case someone driving down and hoping the forecast was wrong.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-mountain.html
    The difference between the two articles is striking. Perhaps that lead to this: https://www.theguardian.com/technolo...ce-for-website
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    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    http://www.wcax.com/story/34520848/s...shire-mountain

    Probably not a great day for a hike. It was snowing from mid day on. The forecast was wavering a bit on the exact forecast for the area up until the AM so I expect it was a case someone driving down and hoping the forecast was wrong.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-mountain.html
    His dogs were probably saying...

    "What's wrong with the human? He's just laying there!

    Yeah, I know. Anyone could tell that the storm was getting worse. Why'd he drag us up here? Dummy.

    Really. Boy, that hut smells good. If he wants to take a nap let's trot back there. I smelled some stuff we can roll in.

    Now he's calling someone on the phone...

    Bipeds are sure strange when they go out for a walk!"

    cb
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    It gives the test first and the lesson afterwards."

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    Senior Member CaptCaper's Avatar
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    This isn't a Map's vs GPS etc post so pleasee don't go there.. we all know the differences.. if you want to discuss that search this forum for those posts.. but

    Sad to see just another guy who won't use a gps.. I've used them since 1998 for hiking and if it was me I would of gotten down ..period..short of breaking my leg.. over the years I've fought with hikers who said it "was a toy" or "what about a white out" .. all myths coming from those who had zero use of one.. or didn't know how to use it.. I have used it in those conditions.. plenty of times.. knowing how to carry it and use it takes practice.. this is why I use it on small hikes which seem stupid to use it on.. it just keeps me tuned in with it.

    I've never gone on a hike without one running all day recording my track.. and with waypoints and other data pertaining to the current hike.... or a route taken from a known mapping program like USGS to keep you in the ball park.. but the track is the most important facet... gives the ability to hike back down..

    I've seen many many hikers lost,die.. rescued because they never made an effort to spend a few bucks and learn how to use one.. Such a shame... I use to carry two of them in duplicate with extra batteries in the winter.. now the wife has one ...saves me from always answering her questions and showing the screen to her on the trails..Ha.

    If this post helps someone to go out and get one and do what I say I like to think I may of saved someone down the line... I'm a retired USCG licensed Captain and used GPS (and other devices pre gps) to find small wrecks with 0 visibility to tacking my way back thru Monomoy treacherous shoals and inlets safely carrying men women children...out and back...adapting it to hiking was no brainier..

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    Senior Member RollingRock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCaper View Post
    I've seen many many hikers lost,die.. rescued because they never made an effort to spend a few bucks and learn how to use one.. Such a shame... I use to carry two of them in duplicate with extra batteries in the winter.. now the wife has one ...saves me from always answering her questions and showing the screen to her on the trails..Ha.
    I don't own a GPS. You don't need one to prevent mishaps such as this one. Just common sense like looking at the weather forecast and when you encounter storms/whiteout conditions just turn around and call it another day. Seems to work for me after over 40 years of hiking.
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    Senior Member carla's Avatar
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    I love how the picture in the Daily Mail shows Franconia Ridge on a clear summer day! Kinda defeats the point of the article....I mean if a point was to make sure that hikers are prepared for bad weather. Yikes on losing his mittens!!! I wonder how those blew away. That would have freaked me out, as a starting point...
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    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    When I first read about this rescue, my first thought was " dam, those poor dogs". But, I tend to favor dogs over people in general. Oh, by the way, what in Gods green earth is a GPS?

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    Senior Member Remix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    Oh, by the way, what in Gods green earth is a GPS?
    Something that put an end to the UFO's in the Bermuda triangle TV shows.....

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    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RollingRock View Post
    I don't own a GPS. You don't need one to prevent mishaps such as this one.
    True enough.

    But, this accident mode is fairly common on Lafayette. Usually folks know enough to walk west and down. But they often head too far south and end up in the ravine.

    A simple compass bearing from the summit area to the hut, written on the map with a nice fat arrow, might have prevented this.

    But like a pilot, you gotta trust your instruments in low- or no-viz condx. Often easier said than done.

    Not sure about Franconia Ridge, but I've seen a few on-line sources of bearings for the Winter Presi Traverse route.

    cb
    "Experience is a harsh teacher.
    It gives the test first and the lesson afterwards."

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    too many people substitute a GPS for common sense. This person's issue wasn't due to a lack of a GPS. He was young, he didn't die, he can learn from the experience. He will probably hate that rescue bill, though.

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    Senior Member alexmtn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisB View Post
    True enough.

    Not sure about Franconia Ridge, but I've seen a few on-line sources of bearings for the Winter Presi Traverse route.

    cb
    Online sources? Ummm, if you're planning an above-tree line hike, All you do is open up your map, use your compass to protract and record the necessary exit bearings, and if jniehof's post hasn't scared you off, fold up and pack your map. Probably less time than finding and comprehending some web page, with the added bonus that you're not relying on someone else's info.

    Alex

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    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisB View Post
    True enough.

    But, this accident mode is fairly common on Lafayette. Usually folks know enough to walk west and down. But they often head too far south and end up in the ravine.

    A simple compass bearing from the summit area to the hut, written on the map with a nice fat arrow, might have prevented this.

    But like a pilot, you gotta trust your instruments in low- or no-viz condx. Often easier said than done.

    Not sure about Franconia Ridge, but I've seen a few on-line sources of bearings for the Winter Presi Traverse route.

    cb
    I think a lot of people hear 'loop' and think that there is only one trail, not knowing that the ridge has trails the continue in both directions. I've seen people with printouts that only include the trails used on the loop, like the map on this page: http://4000footers.com/lafayette.shtml. From the summit of Lafayette the Garfield Ridge Trail might be more apparent, and if you think there is only 1 way, you wouldn't question it.
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    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexmtn View Post
    Online sources? Ummm, if you're planning an above-tree line hike, All you do is open up your map, use your compass to protract and record the necessary exit bearings, and if jniehof's post hasn't scared you off, fold up and pack your map. Probably less time than finding and comprehending some web page, with the added bonus that you're not relying on someone else's info.

    Alex
    I've carried index cards myself, with various coordinates for different routes to bail on. There are times when pulling out a map is not as easy as it sounds. I'm self taught with a compass, but my sense of direction is second none. Personally, if the conditions are so bad you cant see anything, I'm not up there anyway. As important a skill navigating is, weather prediction may be even more important.

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    Out of curiosity did the hiker have to purchase a Hike Safe card to cover the dogs or do dogs get rescued for free?

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    Senior Member jrbren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RollingRock View Post
    I don't own a GPS. You don't need one to prevent mishaps such as this one. Just common sense like looking at the weather forecast and when you encounter storms/whiteout conditions just turn around and call it another day. Seems to work for me after over 40 years of hiking.
    I own multiple GPS devices, I bought one many years ago, it has been collecting dust in one of my closets for many years. I would strongly discourage using GPS as a safety device. It's a toy, nothing more. I have been clocked at 35mph while jogging with my Garmin forerunner, and I lost faith in my trekking GPS when I broke 5500' foot elevation on Camel's Hump in Vt. Relying on GPS alone in an emergency is dangerous. Usually the GPS is accurate to within 1% or 2% in good conditions, but they tend to fall apart in bad weather, like the kind of conditions that were present in the subject of this thread. That said, GPS technology has improved through the years, but I would not trust my safety on it.

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