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Thread: Lost hiker in the Pemi

  1. #76
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    Regardless of the details, if we ever get any. He was out for 6 day's. He hiked through rotten snow, I'm sure a ton of water and fell into a Brook. Now, granted he was almost at the end of his rope, so to speak. I have to say, he did pretty dam good to survive that long. Given what he went through.
    He was also smart enough to place himself in the middle of a slide where he would be visible from the air. And then shine his headlamp at a helicopter.

    Note: A rescue mirror for signaling to aircraft during the day* can be made from 2 CDROMs/DVDs glued back-to-back. You can use 8cm CDROMs if you wish to save space and weight. (Or you can buy one...)
    * Requires a relatively clear sun.

    Doug

  2. #77
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    ...

    And, hold your other hand as a sight on the aircraft and reflect the sun through the V made by two fingers - so you are sure you are aiming it at the aircraft. Wiggle it a bit while your at it.

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  3. #78
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish View Post
    ...

    And, hold your other hand as a sight on the aircraft and reflect the sun through the V made by two fingers - so you are sure you are aiming it at the aircraft. Wiggle it a bit while your at it.

    Tim
    Practice by standing in a sunlit spot and aiming a spot of light on a nearby object such as a tree branch or a feature on a building. You should be able to aim the spot at essentially anything within sight.

    There are two types of signaling mirrors: 2-sided and reflex.
    * a US Govenment training film on how to use a 2-sided signaling mirror: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmnRrCVBaP0
    * a video on how to use a reflex mirror: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubqGrPL8ReI

    Note: a simple mirror, such as the mirror found on a compass will not do the job.

    Doug

  4. #79
    Senior Member hikerbrian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy View Post
    I would love to read about this. Do you have a blog? Or would you ever consider sharing it here? Seriously, that would be interesting to read about.
    I don't have a blog, and I don't think I've ever shared many of the details here. It's probably worth writing up. The story captures a lot of the glory and drama of taking our passion beyond these Appalachian mountains. It's more than 10 years ago now, but I can remember practically every step of that 5-day period.

    This fellow who survived this most recent ordeal: I too have to give him kudos. My heart sank pretty low when I heard they'd swept the trails and not heard from him in a day or two. Considering the conditions, weather, and some of the details we had, I thought his chances were pretty dismal. Regardless of how he got himself into that predicament, the fact that he made it out really says a lot. This guy is a survivor.

    One thing I wonder about is the food situation. I wonder if he had enough extra to keep himself fed, or if he was starting to get pretty hungry? I see the survival shows on TV from time to time where guys (and gals) go days with little or no nutrition, and we all know it takes quite a long time to actually starve to death. Still, trying to stay warm when underfed - I just don't know how you do that. And what does that acute hunger REALLY feel like? What's it like to go to bed cold and hungry and then wake up REALLY cold and REALLY hungry? And know you're still not out of the woods, not by a long shot? I'd buy this guy dinner and a few beers if he'd actually talk us through the whole thing from his perspective. Mighty interesting, I expect.
    Sure. Why not.

  5. #80
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Some people on FB were slamming his choice to ascend the Lincoln Slide. I think it was brilliant. I suspect he could not follow the LBT and had been floundering around in water and mushy snow. He saw the ridge and figured, not only will they be able to see me, I know where that goes even if they don't. I mean, if your lost and you suddenly see a landmark you know, you would be a fool to pass it up. Turned out it saved his life. Hikerbrian, Ill split the tab to sit in, I can talk mountain stuff all day.

  6. #81
    Senior Member Raven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    Some people on FB were slamming his choice to ascend the Lincoln Slide. I think it was brilliant.
    Agreed. He was not likely to get found down low and it must be a deep, rotten, snowy marsh in there. He saw dry rock leading to the ridge. A drier, more visible way out and maybe the easiest way out at that point. If done by design, yes, brilliant, especially considering the likely diminished mental state. It may be the one decision that ultimately got him found.
    Humankind has not woven the web of life.
    We are but one thread within it.
    Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.
    All things are bound together.
    All things connect.
    ~ Chief Seattle, 1854 ~

  7. #82
    Senior Member iAmKrzys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hikerbrian View Post
    One thing I wonder about is the food situation. I wonder if he had enough extra to keep himself fed, or if he was starting to get pretty hungry? I see the survival shows on TV from time to time where guys (and gals) go days with little or no nutrition, and we all know it takes quite a long time to actually starve to death. Still, trying to stay warm when underfed - I just don't know how you do that. And what does that acute hunger REALLY feel like? What's it like to go to bed cold and hungry and then wake up REALLY cold and REALLY hungry? And know you're still not out of the woods, not by a long shot? I'd buy this guy dinner and a few beers if he'd actually talk us through the whole thing from his perspective. Mighty interesting, I expect.
    In case you don't get a first-hand story, I highly recommend 'Lost in the Wild: Danger and Survival in the North Woods'. While it's pretty tough to survive that long in the cold without food, some people succeed. It's pretty impressive!

  8. #83
    Senior Member miehoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TJsName View Post
    I think I understood your point about meaningless speculation, and the associated consequences thereof and I agreed with it. To me, all the talk about charging people for rescues is disheartening and feels like victim blaming. Many people believe they'll act differently than someone in a similar situation and blame the victim for their own circumstances; however, when they themselves are in a situation, they tend to blame outside factors. This can come across as an argument for 'personal responsibility', but it's derived from faulty thinking. There are also people who do this in reverse (make excuses for everyone but are hard on themselves). Both extremes are unfair views of the world, however. It's very hard to be truly objective - one has to actively work at it.
    Yes. That was my thinking. Glad to hear I wasn't just being a grump about things!
    Miehoff

  9. #84
    Senior Member jjo's Avatar
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    Wow interesting but scary...Good detail here..Thanks
    "Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature's peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop away from you like the leaves of Autumn"-J.Muir

  10. #85
    Senior Member iAmKrzys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iAmKrzys View Post
    Yesterday I forgot to mention an idea of using a drone with something like a portable cell phone tower for a SAR rescue mission like this one. Hence, today I decided to do a bit of googling and voila! It appears that this Scottish company PerceiveUAS is already working on autonomous drones for SAR missions that carry a femta cell and have satellite connectivity that could be used for text messaging with lost hikers. Take a look at http://perceptiveuas.com/lab/ and this pretty cool video that explains how it is supposed to work https://vimeo.com/142296665.
    I came across an article today about an AT&T "Flying COW" drone that can provide cell signal covering 40 square miles, which I guess translates to a radius of about 3.5 miles from the drone itself: https://www.engadget.com/2017/11/06/...e-puerto-rico/ No word on whether AT&T would make it available for SAR missions but that's not the main subject of the article. I am also curious as to how long can the drone stay in the air.

  11. #86
    Senior Member dug's Avatar
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    Re: Drones as an S&R Tool

    http://www.wfmynews2.com/news/local/...rone/489604961

    Cornfield easier than the thick Dry River Wilderness, I know.

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