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Thread: The week after Labor Day week

  1. #16
    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    Agreed. Need an intern?

    I do a lot of driving (roughly 45,000 miles per year between work and hiking) and the window of opportunity to avoid traffic has gotten smaller and smaller and on fewer and fewer roads. It is almost impossible to make a drive of any length on a weekday and not encounter some sort of traffic issue no mater what time it is. There are a lot more drivers on the road, driving a lot faster and paying less and less attention so accidents are pretty commonplace. And of course there is construction....everywhere.

    If I could figure out something for employment to do in Gorham (or anywhere in that area for that matter) that made me enough money to have free time to still be able to enjoy time off I'd do it in a second.
    I keep waiting for UberCopter.
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  2. #17
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TJsName View Post
    I keep waiting for UberCopter.
    Have you considered a shoulder city like Portland ME or Portsmouth NH?

    The problem with life above the notches is making a living. If you don't have a remote gig available it can be hard to find a decent paying job. The loooong winter and Mud season are also downers.

    But a city like Portland with many employment possibilities is only one hour from North Conway and three hours from Baxter.

    You'll still make less than in greater Boston, but cost of living is less and quality of life probably better.

    Burlington VT is also a possibility if you can live without a nearby ocean.
    Cb
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  3. #18
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    Portland is an expensive city to live in compared to outlying areas. Not compared to NY or Boston, but compared to the rest of ME and NH its, horrible

  4. #19
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    The greater Portland area is actually getting competitive on salaries from what I have heard from a few folks with the Boston area for certain specialties. The cost of living is definitely going up rapidly, it used to be working class city but the middle and low income folks are getting pushed out off the peninsular. Most of the suburbs are bedroom towns although Westbrook which was regarded as the "armpit" of the area due to a long gone pulp mill is giving a run for a diverse economy with Idex and a lot of other firms located there. Idex does companion animal and livestock diagnostic test kits with some pretty strong IP so they are growing exponentially and its located in Westbrook (unfortunately a few miles remote from the city center).

    That said a lot of folks are willing to take a pay cut to move to the perceived good life in Maine which includes the ability to be on the beach in the morning and hiking before noon. The big trade off is there is abysmal public transportation into town from the suburbs and the local road system from the suburbs into town are quite crowded. There is no commuter rail or subway system and I don't expect there will be one anytime soon. Folks out on the peninsula can get around without cars using the small bus system and the overall scale of the city makes it walkable for three seasons, but it can be quite brutal in winter as many snow storms start as snow, change to rain and then freeze solid. There was an attempt to keep marine businesses in town but that slowly is getting eaten away with more tourist and retail taking over. Various magazines are always writing wonderful things about the city but the reality is they normally are flying in, heading to the Old Port tourist area and writing their article.
    Last edited by peakbagger; 09-15-2017 at 05:21 AM.

  5. #20
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by egilbe View Post
    Portland is an expensive city to live in compared to outlying areas. Not compared to NY or Boston, but compared to the rest of ME and NH its, horrible
    Horrible? Nahhh.

    It's all cashflow. If you are making a good wage, than you can afford decent housing. My kid rents a spacious 2 bedroom near the Old Port for $1300 a month incl heat, etc. In this day and age I don't think that $650 a month per roommate is really horrible.

    One cool development on the Portland waterfront is the growing container port operated by Imskip out of Iceland. Those containers are piled high and always moving. A nice clean cargo operation compared to oil, coal, scrap metal, etc.

    Much of Maine resents Portland and York county in general, but both provide a good overall quality of life and are cheaper than Boston and its burbs (IMHO

    cb
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    It gives the test first and the lesson afterwards."

  6. #21
    Senior Member Stan's Avatar
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    Wages and rent; rent and wages. A vicious cycle but certainly one of temporary independence and indulgence which many of us have certainly enjoyed. But for the long term: buy, buy, buy. Consider the opportunity to create equity in your career and location choices as it is the best path to creating financial self sufficiency, especially older years when our outdoor passions can be more freely pursued.

  7. #22
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan View Post
    Wages and rent; rent and wages. A vicious cycle but certainly one of temporary independence and indulgence which many of us have certainly enjoyed. But for the long term: buy, buy, buy. Consider the opportunity to create equity in your career and location choices as it is the best path to creating financial self sufficiency, especially older years when our outdoor passions can be more freely pursued.
    Stan,

    Unlike most millennials, most of us old farts didn't exit grad school six figures in debt! Once she pays off her college loans, maybe a mortgage...?

    cb
    "Experience is a harsh teacher.
    It gives the test first and the lesson afterwards."

  8. #23
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan View Post
    Wages and rent; rent and wages. A vicious cycle but certainly one of temporary independence and indulgence which many of us have certainly enjoyed. But for the long term: buy, buy, buy. Consider the opportunity to create equity in your career and location choices as it is the best path to creating financial self sufficiency, especially older years when our outdoor passions can be more freely pursued.
    You make a great point. While it was hard to admit, my days of moving around the country are over. I bought a house in March. My mortgage is cheaper then most rents. Granted, it's small house, but my dog likes it.

  9. #24
    Senior Member Raven's Avatar
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    For the time being, Portland, Maine is still "relatively" affordable in some parts. South Berwick, ME would have been an ideal investment 5-10 years ago...it's becoming a trendy, foodie town quickly. Probably still some good options there.

    Portsmouth, NH has become pretty exclusive in terms of housing prices...Dover is still relatively affordable but has been on the rise. I think Rochester, NH is the next place coming up. If I were looking for affordable property within range of mountains, oceans, and lakes, I'd look there. 30 minutes to the lakes region. 45 minutes to the Kanc. 30 minutes to the Atlantic. Set up to have a well developed downtown area and I have already seen the uptick in downtown shops and activity. I think Rochester is going to be a very different town ten years from now compared to the glory days of the rather creepy Rochester Fair...where I have actually seen a "dog and pony show." Really.

    Agree with Stinkyfeet about North of the Notches though. That's a hard, cold, and scary place. Big bears there. You don't want to live there.

    To stay on topic, November is my favorite month to hike. No people. Chill wind. No leaves left so views open up. No snow on the ground yet usually. It's like watching the earth slow down and get ready to sleep for the season.

    And we need to remind people at Appalachia it's after Labor Day. At 8:15 this morning, there were 50 cars already overflowed.
    Last edited by Raven; 09-16-2017 at 08:42 AM.
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  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raven View Post

    And we need to remind people at Appalachia it's after Labor Day. At 8:15 this morning, there were 50 cars already overflowed.
    My car was one of them. We showed up at 8am. Too nice a day to stay home and not hike. Ty Gagne's book got me thinking of Kate Masotrova so the gf and I hiked Starr Lake trail to the summit of Adams. I was trying to picture doing that in February in deep snow, bitter cold, and howling wind. Thats not a trail I would want to do without crampons or snowshoes.

  11. #26
    Senior Member Raven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by egilbe View Post
    My car was one of them. We showed up at 8am. Too nice a day to stay home and not hike. Ty Gagne's book got me thinking of Kate Masotrova so the gf and I hiked Starr Lake trail to the summit of Adams. I was trying to picture doing that in February in deep snow, bitter cold, and howling wind. Thats not a trail I would want to do without crampons or snowshoes.
    Sunny and clear here while the rest of the state lifted from fog yesterday. It was much busier in the afternoon too. I've stood at the start of the unbroken Star Lake Trail in front of those steep, snow covered slopes and my usual thought is, 'Nah. Not today.' And then I head up another way or out. Love the trail but I've stayed off it in winter to date. If I'm standing there in winter I've got both snowshoes and crampons with me.
    Humankind has not woven the web of life.
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    All things are bound together.
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  12. #27
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    I hiked the Star Lake trail a week after her death. There was a a list obsessed VFTT member who wanted to do Adams who was going to do it solo if she couldn't find anyone to go, so I offered to join her. It was windy and cold but nowhere like the conditions from the weekend before. I have done it previously in the winter a couple of times. There are couple of steep snow fields that form that dump right down into Madison Gulf just after the Madison Gulf trail cuts off and there I is good option but to slab across them . The sun frequently turns into it into boilerplate and traversing across it can be challenge. Alternatively if its not consolidated its definitely a slide path. Once past these snowfields there is a lot of exposed rock most winters and it has good going until up near the summit. It has excellent wind protection from the typical westerly and northwesterly winds. That changes quickly where the trail breaks the ridge and its full out wind exposure up to the summit.

    By the way completely opposite to winters day on Adams, yesterday was downright hot and humid, maybe I have been picking the right weekends this summer but for me it was one of the hotter and humid days of the entire summer.

  13. #28
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    Its been an unseasonably cold Summer, imo. We took the Airline trail a couple months ago and it was hot and muggy on the lower slopes, like Saturday, but up above, it was cold and windy. We didnt stay at the summit. Yesterday felt like the middle of August.

  14. #29
    Senior Member Raven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    I hiked the Star Lake trail a week after her death. There was a a list obsessed VFTT member who wanted to do Adams who was going to do it solo if she couldn't find anyone to go, so I offered to join her. It was windy and cold but nowhere like the conditions from the weekend before. I have done it previously in the winter a couple of times. There are couple of steep snow fields that form that dump right down into Madison Gulf just after the Madison Gulf trail cuts off and there I is good option but to slab across them . The sun frequently turns into it into boilerplate and traversing across it can be challenge. Alternatively if its not consolidated its definitely a slide path. Once past these snowfields there is a lot of exposed rock most winters and it has good going until up near the summit. It has excellent wind protection from the typical westerly and northwesterly winds. That changes quickly where the trail breaks the ridge and its full out wind exposure up to the summit.

    By the way completely opposite to winters day on Adams, yesterday was downright hot and humid, maybe I have been picking the right weekends this summer but for me it was one of the hotter and humid days of the entire summer.
    I was looking at those flanks yesterday; I'm not slabbing across those fields above Madison Gulf. I'll continue to take the approaches from the other side in winter.

    All this talk motivated me to get out there yesterday after a sufficient amount of coffee. I really like coming up the Great Gulf side of the ridge when I can, so headed out yesterday with a light pack and a general idea.

    I took Great Gulf up to Madison Gulf and ascended through that wild and rugged place. The wooded ridge that supports the start of the Madison Gulf Trail is fabulous as it rises through the forest dropping off more steeply on both sides. I sat at near the Parapet Trail Junction for a long time. The colors around Star Lake are stunning right now. The grasses have all turned a beautiful sunny orange color. It's as pretty as I've ever seen it right now. I went up Star Lake spending very little time on the summit as I was taking my breaks elsewhere. A few quick hellos and then I was on the way to Madison Hut figuring the easiest way for me to head out was actually over Madison and down Osgood. Yes, it's added elevation, but I chose extra mileage over descending something with a rough treadway. I wasn't going down Madison Gulf in anything short of lightning. I filled some water at the hut, listened to a a nice thru-hiker with the not uncommon complaints about the ruggedness of the Mahoosucs and headed up Madison. Passing a few more thruhikers (who seem to be wearing some AT tag that looks like a luggage tag), I headed down Osgood, just an awesome ridge, passed some more hikers and eventually my pretty tired legs and feet hit the welcoming soft trails below Osgood Tentsite. A long day with surprising heat and humidity up high, but the light breeze was just enough. One of the hotter days I've felt above treeline though. Wonder how close it was to the Washington record on the summit.
    Last edited by Raven; Yesterday at 05:33 AM.
    Humankind has not woven the web of life.
    We are but one thread within it.
    Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.
    All things are bound together.
    All things connect.
    ~ Chief Seattle, 1854 ~

  15. #30
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raven View Post
    And we need to remind people at Appalachia it's after Labor Day. At 8:15 this morning, there were 50 cars already overflowed.
    That lot has been crazy this year. Twice this Summer I've been banished to a street spot at 6:00-6:15AM. Usually have a third of the lot open to me at that time.
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