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Thread: Carpenters Ridge - Mt Lincoln

  1. #1
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    Carpenters Ridge - Mt Lincoln

    Has anyone hiked the Ridge dropping off Mt Lincoln to the west? I have seen it referred to as Carpenters Ridge (after F O Carpenter as noted in old guidebooks)

    It seems that there used to be a trail up this ridge at one point but has long grown over.

    Iím interested in exploring this Ridge as a means to access Lincoln (meaning bushwhacking up the actual Ridge not Lincolnís Throat). Just curious if anyone else on here has attempted this adventure or has any info on it. Iíve searched the forums but havenít seen a TR.....but maybe youíre just trying to keep your secrets safe. And I canít really blame you

    Still...thought I would ask about any beta before I embark on the adventure myself!

  2. #2
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thebigmo13 View Post
    Has anyone hiked the Ridge dropping off Mt Lincoln to the west? I have seen it referred to as Carpenters Ridge (after F O Carpenter as noted in old guidebooks)

    It seems that there used to be a trail up this ridge at one point but has long grown over.

    I’m interested in exploring this Ridge as a means to access Lincoln (meaning bushwhacking up the actual Ridge not Lincoln’s Throat). Just curious if anyone else on here has attempted this adventure or has any info on it. I’ve searched the forums but haven’t seen a TR.....but maybe you’re just trying to keep your secrets safe. And I can’t really blame you

    Still...thought I would ask about any beta before I embark on the adventure myself!
    I can't believe you posted this question! I almost posted the same question SUN. I was on the Kinsmans SAT and standing on the outlook on North Kinsman late afternoon my eye was drawn to that ridge. The way the light was hitting the top it almost looked like a trail right up the spine to Lincoln. Instantly filed that thought away for future reference. It does indeed look like a great hike. My only curiosity was if then scrambling got too severe near the summit. Was hard to tell in satellite images. Hopefully someone has done this hike and has intel to share.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 44/48; NY 46: 5/46

  3. #3
    Senior Member evilhanz's Avatar
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    Carpenter cut a path in 1897 but it didn't last long. The lower portion was obliterated by logging and the final climb to the summit was difficult. Here is the original description if you haven't seen it:

    The path to Mt Lincoln leaves the road at Dry Brook at sign marked "Mt Lafayette and Mt Lincoln". A fine log road leads in one quarter mile (fifteen minutes) to a lumber camp. Cross the brook, log bridge; follow log road a short distance to sign "Mt Lincoln" on right of road (east); follow log roads (well marked in 1897) to wood path two miles (one and one quarter hours) climbing a steep slope. In one-half mile (one-half hour) a spring is reached near path on right under a shelving rock; not found in dry weather. Beyond the spring the path soon rises above the tree line through a steep scramble and climbs up the knife edge of the west spur of Lincoln. The slopes fall sharply on either hand to the tremendous ravines far below. These crags must be climbed with much care as stones are loose and the cliffs are very abrupt. The summit is reached three and three quarters miles from road (three and one half hours). A path leads along the ridge to Mt Lafayette one mile (forty five minutes).

  4. #4
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by evilhanz View Post
    Carpenter cut a path in 1897 but it didn't last long. The lower portion was obliterated by logging and the final climb to the summit was difficult. Here is the original description if you haven't seen it:
    That route sounds awesome. Will be on my list for the summer. The arÍte is what got me.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Hillwalker's Avatar
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    Years ago I was on the falling Waters Trail heading up and decided to bushwhack up from the trail where it joins an old logging road just before the last stream crossing to see what was up there on the ridge. After about 3 to 4 hundred feet I encountered another logging road running along the ridge, and after about the same distance, another and another. Eventually I worked my way up onto the rounded ridge crest Instead of turning right and heading for the summit, I turned left and followed the old roads back down until I hit a wide logging road which I followed. The large logging haul road dumped me out back down onto the Falling Waters Trail just before the rather large rocky crossing of "Dry Brook". Finding the beginning of the haul road is relatively easy. Walking from the parking lot cross the little foot bridge over Walker Brook follow the trail which was once the main logging haul road from Woodstock. Just before you get to the crossing of "Dry Brook" keep your eyes out for an embankment on your left. The embankment becomes a brushy ramp leading down in the same direction you are walking. The brushy ramp is the end of the haul road. Please let us know what you find up there when you do the whack, Incidentally, the old logging haul road is an interesting "whack" from the Falling Waters trail all the way to the Flume trail.

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