Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 54

Thread: Woman shot while mountain biking

  1. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Lewiston, and Biddeford Maine
    Posts
    468
    I keep forgetting one can hunt in NH on Sundays. This time of year, Sundays are for football.most of my hikes are planned around the Pats schedule. I can have more than one passion.

  2. #32
    Senior Member iAmKrzys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    288
    Quote Originally Posted by TCD View Post
    Useful info here:

    http://www.ihea-usa.org/hunting-and-...e-requirements

    So in most of our areas on VFTT, there is no *requirement* to wear blaze orange. In states where there are actual requirements, the requirements are written to apply mostly to hunters, and not so much to other people in the woods.
    I think this web page is directed primarily at hunters while in fact at least in some cases the requirements may apply to non-hunters as well. For example, I dug up a picture of a sign posted at one of the State Game Lands that I visited in Pennsylvania a couple of years ago. I might be not be reading this correctly but it appears to me that wearing orange is required of non-hunters as well:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC04142 (2).JPG 
Views:	39 
Size:	104.1 KB 
ID:	5930
    I believe hunting in Pennsylvania on Sundays is mostly forbidden and same holds for New Jersey.

    In New York I think hunting on Sundays is permitted and wearing bright colors while hiking is encouraged but from my reading of the below sign it is not required:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02859.jpg 
Views:	30 
Size:	115.4 KB 
ID:	5931

    Personally, I prefer to minimize chances of getting shot while in the woods, so I even got myself an orange rain cover for my backpack and I put it on during hunting season.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02900.jpg 
Views:	38 
Size:	108.2 KB 
ID:	5932
    If that cover some day helps me avoid getting killed or injured it may turn out to be the best $11 I have ever spent on hiking gear.

    Finally, in a similar case few days ago in New York a hunter killed a woman who was walking her dogs: http://abcnews.go.com/US/york-woman-...ry?id=51377244
    Last edited by iAmKrzys; 11-27-2017 at 09:09 PM. Reason: WMA is the term used in NJ, not PA

  3. #33
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    2,074
    Hikers have lot’s of privelages. Why not stay out of the woods for a Month to let Hunters do the same.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  4. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Lewiston, and Biddeford Maine
    Posts
    468
    Quote Originally Posted by skiguy View Post
    Hikers have lot’s of privelages. Why not stay out of the woods for a Month to let Hunters do the same.
    I only hike in places where I’m pretty sure hunters don't want to go. As was mentioned, get too far from the road and that makes for a longer drag. Wilderness areas are pretty good for hiking in November. I’ve had no issues with hiking, nor hunters, but I wear blaze orange, just to be on the safe side.

  5. #35
    Senior Member Raven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    NH Seacoast
    Posts
    1,543
    This coming weekend is the final weekend of rifle season for deer in NH. Be extra careful. This is the last opportunity hunters have this year for a deer in NH with a rifle. (12/3 is last day).

    Also, interestingly enough, if you shoot a deer in NY, you can't bring it back to NH through Mass or Vt.
    Humankind has not woven the web of life.
    We are but one thread within it.
    Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.
    All things are bound together.
    All things connect.
    ~ Chief Seattle, 1854 ~

  6. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Gorham NH
    Posts
    4,915
    Quote Originally Posted by Raven View Post
    This coming weekend is the final weekend of rifle season for deer in NH. Be extra careful. This is the last opportunity hunters have this year for a deer in NH with a rifle. (12/3 is last day).

    Also, interestingly enough, if you shoot a deer in NY, you can't bring it back to NH through Mass or Vt.
    My guess is NY is on the fringe of the Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) ("mad deer disease") epidemic? Given the overpopulation of deer in the suburbs in southern New England I expect when CWD hits its going to hit hard.

  7. #37
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    15
    Summit fever can push us hikers into making poor decisions that result in our peril. A similar thing can happen with hunters. It is called buck fever. When game is spotted, adrenaline spikes, and impulsive decisions can be made with disastrous outcomes. As a former hunter from Michigan, I have seen this play out too many times. This is part of human nature. You can light up like a Christmas tree and extensively train hunters, yet there will still be this element of risk. I don't hunt anymore. I frequently ride and hike in popular deer hunting areas of southern NH and accept increased risk this time of year. I feel wearing prescribed colors makes risk lower than risk of curtailing what I love to do.

  8. #38
    Senior Member Raven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    NH Seacoast
    Posts
    1,543
    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    My guess is NY is on the fringe of the Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) ("mad deer disease") epidemic? Given the overpopulation of deer in the suburbs in southern New England I expect when CWD hits its going to hit hard.
    Yes, CWD is what F&G has as the reason on their website.
    Humankind has not woven the web of life.
    We are but one thread within it.
    Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.
    All things are bound together.
    All things connect.
    ~ Chief Seattle, 1854 ~

  9. #39
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    New hampshire
    Posts
    2,363
    Quote Originally Posted by skiguy View Post
    Hikers have lotís of privelages. Why not stay out of the woods for a Month to let Hunters do the same.
    What privileges do hikers have? Besides, on most of the 4k's, you will never see a hunter. I always find it fascinating when hikers try to bring up restrictions on themselves. I've heard mention of quota's, limiting car's in parking area's. The whole idea behind going to the mountains is to get away from restrictions, imo. I'm not skipping a month, so someone can have the woods alone to hunt.

  10. #40
    Senior Member dug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Xanadu
    Posts
    1,865
    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    What privileges do hikers have?
    Well, for the better part of a century, contributing $0 toward S&R, trail maintenance, etc. of which many of the costs were alleviated by hunting and fishing, I'd say is a start.

  11. #41
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    New hampshire
    Posts
    2,363
    Quote Originally Posted by dug View Post
    Well, for the better part of a century, contributing $0 toward S&R, trail maintenance, etc. of which many of the costs were alleviated by hunting and fishing, I'd say is a start.
    First off, I don't use SAR services. Second, the AMC's trail work is covered by the fee's they charge. The Forest Service trail work is covered by my taxes. Over 30% of what I make goes to the government and the Forest is owned and run by a government agency. So don't think I will feel one bit of guilt for being able to hike there.

  12. #42
    Senior Member dug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Xanadu
    Posts
    1,865
    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    First off, I don't use SAR services. Second, the AMC's trail work is covered by the fee's they charge. The Forest Service trail work is covered by my taxes. Over 30% of what I make goes to the government and the Forest is owned and run by a government agency. So don't think I will feel one bit of guilt for being able to hike there.
    Not saying anyone should feel guilt, but for what hikers put into the mountains vs. what is taken, in relationship to hunters, pales. And, no, I've never hunted.

    Not using SAR services doesn't mean it's not a service provided to hikers, and up until recently not paid for. If one doesn't belong to the AMC, no fees are collected for that hiker. Forest Service is covered by taxes, but that's the same for everyone who uses the Forest, so that's a wash.

  13. #43
    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    'Springtime' on the Carters (Somerville, MA)
    Posts
    1,585
    There are a lot of complex statements being bandied about here with regards to resource usage and funding. It's not as though the 1400+ miles of trail in the AMC White Mountain Guide were all built and are maintained with public funds (or by the AMC). The network is the results of public and private work to acquire land and to build and maintain the trails. And while hunters and fisherpeople do pay fees for licenses to help fund the NHF&G, they incur costs too - such as employing people to work at weigh stations and fisheries - with over 100 employees listed in the directory.

    I'd be curious to see a comparative analysis of revenue to cost for F&G vs the FS when it comes to end users. I'd also be interested to see how volunteerism (and near-volunteerism) helps defray costs for each department. I would guess that hikers contribute a lot more free time, but I'm not sure how else F&G uses volunteer resources, aside from volunteer S&R of course. It's a complex issue that really requires some actual data to come to reasonable conclusions.
    | 62.2% W48: 19/48
    Trail Adopter of the Guinea Pond Trail (Pemi District)

  14. #44
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    New hampshire
    Posts
    2,363
    Quote Originally Posted by dug View Post
    Not saying anyone should feel guilt, but for what hikers put into the mountains vs. what is taken, in relationship to hunters, pales. And, no, I've never hunted.

    Not using SAR services doesn't mean it's not a service provided to hikers, and up until recently not paid for. If one doesn't belong to the AMC, no fees are collected for that hiker. Forest Service is covered by taxes, but that's the same for everyone who uses the Forest, so that's a wash.
    This topic comes up every now and then and it tends to see contentious opinions. Hunter's pay to hunt via a license, but they get a return in whatever game they may take. I think a 150 lb deer is a good return on a license fee and yes, I know not all are successful. I put a lot of money into the North Country economy, so my impact is a positive one. As far as SAR goes, I've always thought there should be a better way to fund that, I cant believe it's still an issue to be honest. In regards to funding SAR missions. I've always advocated charging those who use the service. It's fair and it's appropriate. If I have spent the time and money to go out there and do it right, I see zero reason to help pay for those that don't. Even those who just have an accident, they should pay for what service they get. No different then riding in an ambulance. I've also given thought to a percentage of the parking fee's going into the SAR fund. There you would have a direct user contributing. If people are against hunter's and fisherman paying for search and rescue, they should contact their representatives and try to change it.

  15. #45
    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    'Springtime' on the Carters (Somerville, MA)
    Posts
    1,585
    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    This topic comes up every now and then and it tends to see contentious opinions. Hunter's pay to hunt via a license, but they get a return in whatever game they may take. I think a 150 lb deer is a good return on a license fee and yes, I know not all are successful. I put a lot of money into the North Country economy, so my impact is a positive one. As far as SAR goes, I've always thought there should be a better way to fund that, I cant believe it's still an issue to be honest. In regards to funding SAR missions. I've always advocated charging those who use the service. It's fair and it's appropriate. If I have spent the time and money to go out there and do it right, I see zero reason to help pay for those that don't. Even those who just have an accident, they should pay for what service they get. No different then riding in an ambulance. I've also given thought to a percentage of the parking fee's going into the SAR fund. There you would have a direct user contributing. If people are against hunter's and fisherman paying for search and rescue, they should contact their representatives and try to change it.
    Does pay-for-service include police and fire? Why not privatize all public services? It'll be like signing up for health insurance. You want the gold package?

    As for licenses, I am curious how much licenses fund, vs act as a means to regulate and monitor hunting. If it was purely financial I'd be fine if the funds came out of the general fund to reduce inefficiency. I suspect there is an important data component though.
    | 62.2% W48: 19/48
    Trail Adopter of the Guinea Pond Trail (Pemi District)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •