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Thread: Compass Recommendation

  1. #31
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nessmuk View Post
    I am told this is a pretty good read.

    http://www.adkhighpeaksfoundation.or...navagation.php

    enjoy.
    That is a good article. I found the navigating section in Mountaineering:Freedom Of The Hills to be very good. First "real read" I did on the subject. I also bought the related navigation book that apparently this was summarized from and it is excellent. Red covered book - forget the title.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 44/48; NY 46: 5/46

  2. #32
    Junior Member briarpatch's Avatar
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    The Suunto Compass that DayTrip came across could be their KB-14. Suunto makes a 360 degree and quadrant version. I will use it when working with a total station to perform topographic, layout and as-built surveys for work. It has 5 degree increment marks when views from the top and 1/2 degree marks on the dial when viewed through the sighting lens. I have used it for hiking and orienteering in the woods. However I would not recommend it for that use. Drawbacks are its costs, it is heavy, not good in low light and the need to wearing your glasses when using the sighting lens. When using the sighting lens you keep both eyes open and the dial and sight line is superimposed into your vision. Readings can be very precise even when compared to angles measured from a total station. Models include compass only and compass and clinometer combination. Compass models can have delineation correction. Literature that is included with the compass on the delineation adjustment needs to clarified/corrected and should be halved.

    Top View Click image for larger version. 

Name:	KB-14 Top View.jpg 
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ID:	5957
    Side View Click image for larger version. 

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    Sighting Lens Click image for larger version. 

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    Sighting line on right is for declination correction.

  3. #33
    Junior Member Salty's Avatar
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    Also a Suunto fan (I have one of the MC-2 versions) and I see they have one of those with a luminous dial. Been using that model for over 10 years now (replaced once, but only because I lost the first one). To me, the most important features are the clear base, sighting mirror and declination adjustment, the latter because I really don't want to deal with math in the woods. :-)

    Concerning vision, I'd just get a cheap, small magnifying glass, which seem to be sold in bulk, and tie it onto the lanyard. If it breaks, no big whoop.

  4. #34
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    I just keep my glasses on. Without them I can't read very well, or see distances very well. Gotta love getting old.

  5. #35
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by egilbe View Post
    I just keep my glasses on. Without them I can't read very well, or see distances very well. Gotta love getting old.
    I take them off to read my compass...

    I'm near-sighted and read without them, but wear them when hiking or skiing--makes the world a bit clearer. (I suppose I could get multi-focals or progressives, but I prefer the undistorted field of view of singles for hiking and skiing.)

    Doug

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by briarpatch View Post
    The Suunto Compass that DayTrip came across could be their KB-14. Suunto makes a 360 degree and quadrant version. I will use it when working with a total station to perform topographic, layout and as-built surveys for work. It has 5 degree increment marks when views from the top and 1/2 degree marks on the dial when viewed through the sighting lens. I have used it for hiking and orienteering in the woods. However I would not recommend it for that use. Drawbacks are its costs, it is heavy, not good in low light and the need to wearing your glasses when using the sighting lens. When using the sighting lens you keep both eyes open and the dial and sight line is superimposed into your vision. Readings can be very precise even when compared to angles measured from a total station. Models include compass only and compass and clinometer combination. Compass models can have delineation correction. Literature that is included with the compass on the delineation adjustment needs to clarified/corrected and should be halved.

    Top View Click image for larger version. 

Name:	KB-14 Top View.jpg 
Views:	24 
Size:	69.1 KB 
ID:	5957
    Side View Click image for larger version. 

Name:	KB-14 Side View.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	73.3 KB 
ID:	5958
    Sighting Lens Click image for larger version. 

Name:	KB-14 Slighting Lens.jpg 
Views:	24 
Size:	63.8 KB 
ID:	5959

    Sighting line on right is for declination correction.
    I provided a link previously to the plastic version which is a bit more reasonable in cost. No declination adjustment but I think it has the same resolution. This style works a lot quicker for running a bearing line, just pick up, look forward with one eye through the compass and pick a tree or something else that is on the bearing and then find the path of least resistance to it. What can really introduce error is trying to look down at a bearing on a plate type compass held waste high. We did some tests with boy scouts and even though they knew they were being tested, trying to keep their body and eyes square to a plate compass introduces up to 20 degrees of total error (plus or minus 10). One thing to keep in mind if you order one make sure you get the right markings, Some have a 360 degree scale and some have a quadrant scale
    Last edited by peakbagger; 02-15-2018 at 03:02 PM. Reason: Added missing text

  7. #37
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    I think I am going to get a K&R model I saw on the website peakbagger referenced. It was a base plate style with 1 deg marks, a sighting line in the lid and a flip up magnifying sight to read the bearings. Kind of a combination of base plate and lensatic. I think it was $26 and from what I read on other sites that brand I guess is pretty decent (although I personally have never heard of it). Didn't have a luminous dial but for the price I guess I'll live with it.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 44/48; NY 46: 5/46

  8. #38
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    Some have a 360 degree scale and some have
    ......wait for it........ (I assume you were going to say "mils" but hit enter first).
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 44/48; NY 46: 5/46

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