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Thread: Hiking under the influence (of electronics)

  1. #16
    Senior Member Grey J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCaper View Post
    Great job here... we need a like button... "Land of Many Uses" is key. You left out snowmachine's which I love. I'm always at odds during snow season to hike or snowmachine.. I do fit in both somehow.
    Look closer, Tom_Murphy does include snow machines. The premise is valid. We are all in agreement. A National Forest is a Land of Many Uses. All are welcome.
    "I am a pilgrim and a stranger"

  2. #17
    Senior Member Raven's Avatar
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    I was going to skip this thread. I'm glad I didn't. Two nuggets here:

    Tom's comment, "As I get older, the USFS slogan "Land of Many Uses" seems to gain more and more wisdom." Indeed.

    And this is the best story I've read in awhile.

    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    ... On the Northern Peaks I got TOS from Maine, killer heavy metal. One day, I fell snow climbing and slid and bounced about 30 ft. before arresting my fall. The whole time, I had extremely loud heavy metal music blasting away, lol.
    Ozzy's "Coming Down the Mountain?" Sabbath's "Snowblind?"

    TOS is a great station.

    As to the OP, Rarely, I will listen to music on a trail run but not when hiking. I like being present in nature, but I totally understand someone liking the energy from music or the company of a voice on a podcast. HYOH...with ear buds.
    Last edited by Raven; 05-11-2018 at 05:32 PM.
    Humankind has not woven the web of life.
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    All things connect.
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  3. #18
    Senior Member Jazzbo's Avatar
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    I listen to music sometimes when I'm hiking especially if I have long steep climb takes my mind off the tedium of long steep climb. A nice beat sometimes makes me go faster than I might with out it. As my trail name implies I tend towards the cerebral type music so I still have my hearing. There is a jazz musician Willie Myette Trio jazz published CD by the name The Edge with lots of hiking themes. The Edge is reference to Knife Edge and an image of Knife Edge is on the cover. When it came out Eric Jackson WGBH was interviewing him on radio one night about his new album "The Edge". Eric asked him what he listens to when he's up on Katadin. He responded "I don't listen to anything. I'm too busy watching my foot placement on all the rocks". I listen to music at other times when the mood strikes me and when battery power permits. Of course I don't listen to music when I'm hiking with a group. HYOH
    Last edited by Jazzbo; 05-12-2018 at 06:22 AM.
    On #67 of NE67
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  4. #19
    Senior Member Grey J's Avatar
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    Though I never listen to music thru earbuds while hiking, I believe I have heard playing in my head the repetitive rhythmic beat of Led Zeppelin's Kashmir on a couple of death marches.
    "I am a pilgrim and a stranger"

  5. #20
    Senior Member iAmKrzys's Avatar
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    Personally, I love to hear all the sounds from my surroundings while I'm hiking. I estimate that some 90% of my snake sightings were because I heard tiny rustling in the leaves and decided to investigate.

  6. #21
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Ear buds are nice but I actually prefer my 80’s boom box that takes 12 D cells strapped with bungees on top of my Kelty frame pack. I usually find that half volume is enough to keep the bears away. In all seriousness that would be the worst case scenario. I prefer if others do use there own headphones and not play it out loud. Although if there is some residual sound drift from a passerby coming from their headphones I am not offended. Personally I have hiked with earbuds and do enjoy the inspiration the music provides but I do enjoy the sounds of nature also. On that note I have found that with earbuds I am not totally cut off from the world around me walking like some unaware zombie. At the appropriate volume level one can enjoy some enlightenment from both one’s own music and the nature around them.
    Last edited by skiguy; 05-13-2018 at 09:58 AM.
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  7. #22
    Senior Member RollingRock's Avatar
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    I like to hear the sounds of nature while I'm hiking...the wind, the babbling brook, the birds, footsteps, jets, planes, the cog whistle....

    When backpacking, I carry a small radio with a huge antenna. I like listening to the local rock station for the music, weather, news, etc. After being out in nature all day, it provides me company, friendship, a voice. I can listen to the radio while cooking and chilling out. In case I would offend anyone, I do have earbuds in case nobody wants me to share.
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  8. #23
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grey J View Post
    Though I never listen to music thru earbuds while hiking, I believe I have heard playing in my head the repetitive rhythmic beat of Led Zeppelin's Kashmir on a couple of death marches.
    Comfortably Numb by Pink Floyd tends to invade my mind on long trudges out of the woods late at night like Lincoln Woods or a road walk.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 5/46

  9. #24
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    I don't bring electronics, but sometimes sing to myself. Favorite hiking song is "Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts."

  10. #25
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    Some people must like the sound of their own voice. One of my Chinese trekking guides had the habit of singing on the trail, then immediately playing back a recording of it from his cell phone.
    Last edited by Sanbu; 05-14-2018 at 08:03 PM.
    散步 Sanbu

  11. #26
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    Edit: change “stinging” to “singing”
    散步 Sanbu

  12. #27
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    If I sang, stinging would have been correct..... A voice meant for the car only when the radio is played loud enough to cover me.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  13. #28
    Senior Member Jazzbo's Avatar
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    I'll say one thing for solo bushwhacking. I did a solo bushwhack to Mount Chandler an area teeming with wild life in spite of (or perhaps due to) past logging activity. Hiking solo there is no loud conversations to cause critters to head for cover well in advance of your passage. I saw cow moose and calf. I saw two bear cubs scramble up a tree. Obviously I made no effort to get closer due mother's instinct to protect. One could say hiking in a group isolates the party from more intimate experience of nature just as much as listening to the ear-buds.
    On #67 of NE67
    On #98 of NEHH
    On #44 of WNH48

    "Commuter—one who spends his life
    In riding to and from his wife;
    A man who shaves and takes a train,
    And then rides back to shave again." EB White (1899-1986)

  14. #29
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzbo View Post
    I'll say one thing for solo bushwhacking. I did a solo bushwhack to Mount Chandler an area teeming with wild life in spite of (or perhaps due to) past logging activity. Hiking solo there is no loud conversations to cause critters to head for cover well in advance of your passage. I saw cow moose and calf. I saw two bear cubs scramble up a tree. Obviously I made no effort to get closer due mother's instinct to protect. One could say hiking in a group isolates the party from more intimate experience of nature just as much as listening to the ear-buds.

    I agree, I see much more wildlife solo and much closer than I see it with small groups. If I go with the scouts, we don't see anything except a squirrel or a songbird who are more use to people.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  15. #30
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    I have the same experience when solo hiking. When I am doing AT boundary work, the area is generally in the deep woods rarely visited by anyone although the boundary swath sometimes is clear enough to be a game trail. One day I was sitting next to boundary marker I recovered writing some notes and had a woodchuck walk by me by about a foot away from where I was sitting. I see lots more wildlife when I am off trail even when I am making noise going through the woods. I usually have a ACR whistle around my neck to give a toot if the larger animals like bears and moose are inadvertently heading too close in my direction. The ACR toot doesn't sound like anything natural so it wakes them up that something unusual is in the woods.

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