Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 22 of 22

Thread: Age-related "power endurance" limitations?

  1. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Essex Co., Mass.
    Posts
    96
    Quote Originally Posted by jfb View Post
    Learning how muscles burn fuel for energy may help you understand what's going on when you're hiking. Here's a link that has some good general info: http://teammudge.org/training/TrainingLogIntro2.pdf
    Very interesting, even if I don't train, this will help me understand the lingo and what's probably going on.
    Steve H.
    NH4000 1976-1984
    NE4000 1984-1991

  2. #17
    Senior Member Mac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Dartmouth, Nova Scotia - Avatar: Near Lake Louise
    Posts
    200
    Just turned 60. Not hitting the "wall" just yet. This thread is very informative. Keep it up.

  3. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Gorham NH
    Posts
    5,393
    Given the age of VFTT, us original members are pretty well guaranteed to be getting darn close to 60

  4. #19
    Senior Member RollingRock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Waterville Valley, NH
    Posts
    569
    Just turned 64, hike regularly and actually feel pretty good. Not hitting the wall just yet! I also work out on the gym 2-3 times a week regularly using the elliptical but I don't use the bars so my legs get the brunt of the workout.

    I've noticed that I'm getting a bit slower than my younger hiking companions but not by much.

    I'm slowing down from getting a bit more winded on the ups, a weak left ankle, and an arthritic right knee. It's all about foot placement so I don't aggravate any joint pain.

    I'm thinking of thru-hiking the AT when I retire at 66. I need to lose 20 pounds to make that work. Weight gain over the years has an impact on one's ability no matter the age.
    GayOutdoors.org
    It's the journey, not the destination

  5. #20
    Senior Member TCD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,739
    Good point about weight gain, which I don't think had been covered earlier in this thread. I am one of the fortunate ones; my weight never changes - I've been stuck right at 140 lbs. for the last 40 years. If I make a real effort, I can put on 5 lbs. or lose 5 lbs., but as soon as I go back my normal habits, the needle goes right back to 140. But for folks (mostly guys) who have put the 20 lbs. on the belly that is so common, the fastest way to improve performance, especially uphill performance, is to lose that 20. It's easier, faster, and does more for performance than any other nutrition or training changes.

  6. #21
    Senior Member Puma concolor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North of Albany, NY
    Posts
    849
    Good thread. 49 here (hiking/climbing for 25 years).

    I mean I hate to be a negative Nancy, but when I see a 60-year-old man reporting that he needs to stop to sit down every 50 feet on steep uphill bushwhacks while NOT being out of breath, the first thing my mind goes to is the old ticker.

    Others here have made good points about peak age for cardio-vascular endurance and the decline in VO2 max with age. And I’ve certainly pushed myself over the years to the point of near collapse. But when I see circumstances such as those that were reported in the OP, I immediately think of all of those heart attack on the trail reports I’ve seen over the years. My two cents ... take this seriously.
    Last edited by Puma concolor; 09-22-2018 at 12:56 PM.

  7. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Essex Co., Mass.
    Posts
    96
    Thanks for the comment. I'll take it seriously.
    Steve H.
    NH4000 1976-1984
    NE4000 1984-1991

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •