Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 20 of 20

Thread: Winter Shelter Recommendations For Solo Hiker

  1. #16
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Woodstock, CT
    Posts
    2,175
    Quote Originally Posted by Brambor View Post
    My only complaint about the BD First Light are the lack of a vestibule to stow my gear, to cook and to ventilate the tent without getting snow/rain in. When You open the door then 1/3 of the tent seems to be fair game to get rained on. Otherwise it's a cool winter shelter. Rab makes something very similar.
    Yes I have found a few: the Black Diamond First Light, MSR Advance Pro 2 and the North Face Assault 2 (which I think I like most of the 3 because of it's window configuration and it does come with a vestibule that I don't have to use). The Rab model was super low inside (I'm 6'3"). Big Agnes had a model too but it was much heavier than the others I found.

    I'll likely only be camping in fairly good weather and lower winds for one night so the lack of a vestibule isn't a deal breaker for me. These tents all seem to get universally trashed for not being waterproof in the rain though, which is a concern. I'll again not likely be out when it is raining but I am curious if blowing powder or snow off tree branches settles on it if it melts and comes through. I guess to be the "fortresses" they are advertised to be conditions need to be comfortably below freezing, which for my fairly limited application I think will be just fine.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 5/46

  2. #17
    Senior Member Brambor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Windham, ME
    Posts
    1,028
    It's a winter shelter, so anyone using it in rain is asking for it. :-)

    Having said that, we do have January thaw... it's real :-)

    Basically, some condensation is a given in this tent even in the dead of winter. In the winter it will just freeze so you might get that tiny sensation of microscopic snowflakes. But cooking in it will increase that condensation buildup (logical) . That is why I favored the Hilleberg Soulo - I can open the entire side of the inner tent to ventilate...I can cook in the vestibule while it's snowing outside or while it's windy and blowing snow.
    Luck is where preparation meets opportunity.

  3. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Worcester, MA
    Posts
    365
    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    I would be doing an overnight as close to treeline or a summit/outlook as possible. I don't intend to camp in the open but would like to be close to it so some consideration for wind is a factor.
    Have you considered using a three season tent? I camp in the woods in the winter, avoid overnights where a heavy snow is expected, and I am not expecting my tent to be an above tree line emergency shelter (since I venture up there on blue bird days).

    With those caveats, you eliminate the need for a tent designed to be able to handle the higher wind loading and snow loads that a four season tent is designed for.

    I have been using a Mountain Hardwear Light Wedge 2 Tent for ~ 10 years with good results. I do leave the vestibule door and tent screen unzipped at the top to act as a roof vent. I do occasionally get snow blowing under the fly. I have had to brush off snow in the middle of the night.

  4. #19
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Woodstock, CT
    Posts
    2,175
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom_Murphy View Post
    Have you considered using a three season tent? I camp in the woods in the winter, avoid overnights where a heavy snow is expected, and I am not expecting my tent to be an above tree line emergency shelter (since I venture up there on blue bird days).

    With those caveats, you eliminate the need for a tent designed to be able to handle the higher wind loading and snow loads that a four season tent is designed for.

    I have been using a Mountain Hardwear Light Wedge 2 Tent for ~ 10 years with good results. I do leave the vestibule door and tent screen unzipped at the top to act as a roof vent. I do occasionally get snow blowing under the fly. I have had to brush off snow in the middle of the night.
    I have wondered about that but most of the designs have a significant amount of mesh for ventilation in warmer weather. I assume that makes for a much colder night where even a 5-10 mph wind would go right through the tent, blow in snow, etc. I suppose I could get a different 3 season tent than what I have (my 3 season tents would definitely have problems the way they are designed) but they're not that much lighter than what I am looking at anyway so the cost savings really wouldn't put me into a better situation. I suppose one night this Winter if I haven't bought a new tent I'll have to try setting my 3 season up in the yard for a night and see what happens. I'm not optimistic... but a free solution would sure be nice. (Of course knowing myself the way I do as soon as Backcountry or REI emails me one of those 20% Off A Single Item coupons I'll come running wallet in hand. )
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 5/46

  5. #20
    Senior Member dave.m's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Bahston
    Posts
    619
    I use a generic MegaMid knock-off for my winter camping. IMO, what keeps you warm is a) sleeping bag, b) stopping wind, which includes drafts under the fly, and c) controling body sweat (I use a Stephenson VB shirt to sleep in).

    The MegaMid is nice and warm if pitched directly down to the snow. Kicking snow to cover the edges eliminates drafts entirely but may add some frost from condensation. I use a square non-waterproof bivy sack that accepts a sleeping pad INSIDE of the bivy to keep snow out from between the pad and bag. This eliminates the need for a ground cloth.

    I've found that pitching a square 'Mid style Tarp/tent to be the easiest in terms of set up. I pre tie 6' lengths of cord to the corners and loop them around buried deadfall with a truckers hitch tied off on the corner tie off point. The dead men set up in a few minutes if you work harden the snow and the trucker hitch come undone like a slip knot so I can just pull it out without digging out the anchors. If skiing, it can be set with skis too.


    If I were replacing it, I would lol for lighter material and vent at the peak. But I have no intention of changing my basic approach. This is the most comfortable and lightest solution I've found for below treeline winter use.
    - Dave (a.k.a. pinnah)

    " Power corrupts. Absolute power is kind of neat." - John Lehman, US Secretary of the Navy 1981-1987

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •