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Thread: MSR Whisperlite Stove

  1. #61
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    2) The Nova's regulator is attached at the burner as opposed to the tank on the Whisperlite. This seems to create far superior flame control in YouTube videos I watched. One reviewer pointed out though that because of that when you turn the stove off the remaining fuel in the line can't burn out/evaporate. Is simply holding the line up and letting it drain back into the tank sufficient to get gas out or will it be dripping out - in particular once it is back in my backpack? Not sure if fuel lines on these things have some sort of valve mechanism like the hose on a hydration bladder that close the line when it is unplugged or if they are just open.
    The Whisperlite does not burn all the fuel in the line when you shut off the regulator at the bottle. You can depressurize the bottle and then let (most of) the fuel drain back, but I generally burn off the fuel in the line at the line end, after unplugging it from the bottle.

    Tim
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  2. #62
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    I noticed that a lot of the stove reviews (for MSR, Optimus and others) go back to 2012 or earlier. A lot has changed for many of these stoves since then. I generally try not to place too much weight on reviews for anything unless I see a common issue over and over, which usually means the issue is legit. YouTube is nice because you can see it for yourself, even if the reviewer is "slanting" the review one way or the other.

    I think I've slowly come back around to a white gas stove and the basic Whisperlite. Dependable design made for what I'm using it for. The SVEA 123R probably is
    a more dependable and simple design but has the shortest burn times/smallest fuel capacity and is the slowest stove I have seen, not a good combination. The Reactor is basically a variant of my JetBoil and given how expensive it is I don't really want to plunk down that kind of money for the "same thing" I have and the related concerns I have now, even if maybe it does perform better. And that Nova stove really seems to be the same stove as the Whisperlite with better materials and some better design elements. It was slower than the Whisperlite in videos I watched, but not prohibitively so. That premium in price may be worth it.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 5/46

  3. #63
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    My read on whisperlight's is they arent cheap construction, its a proven design that has been on the market a long time. Parts are readily available for 30 year old stoves and barring major abuse are infinitely rebuildable. Nothing wrong with "plastic" components on the fuel system. with the exception of design flaw on the early Dragonfly pumps I havent heard of many pump failures except for folks who dont check the O rings or expect the leathers will last forever without lubrication. Even a metal pump has O rings. It was optimized to put out a lot of heat in short time, if you want to do "gourmet" cooking with turn down go with a gas stove or if its large group, a MSR Dragonfire puts out plenty of heat with excellent turn down. The trade off with a whisperlight is it was optimized for the demands of a small group. It works for two folks but is actually is better with a group of 3 or 4 which was a typical winter party. For solo or a couple I expect the Svea's are the right size but up the group size and the output and fuel capacity is not enough which can lead to flare ups due it being pushed past its capacity.

    In the ancient history of VFTT when we had the Gatherings, I traditionally did large pots of spaghetti and my stove of choice was either a 2 burner coleman or my Dragonfly.

    Back when I was assisting a local scout troop we were in the market for white gas stoves, we looked at several brands and eventually picked whisperlights as they were the simplest. We trained many 11 year olds on how to run them and maintain them and they held up for 10 years of use and were probably running long after I stopped assisting them. A lot of other scout troops made the same choice. I even had a few scouts who picked up the trick to simmering.

  4. #64
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    So I did go ahead and get an Optimus Nova stove. One thing I had not thought of with a gas stove - when you take the fuel pump out of the fuel bottle to pack up camp I assume it is covered in fuel. How do you clean/wipe for storage in the backpack? Does the residual fuel evaporate if you just let it sit for a minute before packing? Store in a Ziploc bag and clean at home?
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 5/46

  5. #65
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    Can you leave the pump in? I do with the Whisperlite. White gas is definitely a messy option.

    Tim
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  6. #66
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    The fuel evaporates but many folks pack stoves in outside pockets.

  7. #67
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    So I did go ahead and get an Optimus Nova stove. One thing I had not thought of with a gas stove - when you take the fuel pump out of the fuel bottle to pack up camp I assume it is covered in fuel. How do you clean/wipe for storage in the backpack? Does the residual fuel evaporate if you just let it sit for a minute before packing? Store in a Ziploc bag and clean at home?
    I'd just leave the pump in the bottle. It does look like it comes with it's own sack but you might want to wrap it in another stuff sack. I usually bring a pair of thinner gloves for handling my white gas stove. You can store them in the same bag as the stove along with a rag. Any which way your going to deal with some residual gas when handling the pump.

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    Last edited by skiguy; 11-15-2018 at 11:31 AM.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  8. #68
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish View Post
    Can you leave the pump in? I do with the Whisperlite. White gas is definitely a messy option.

    Tim
    I didn't see any specific warning in manual not to and the Nova filter assembly has on on/off knob at the pump so I wouldn't think it would leak. Instructions all have the stove being completely broken down for storage so I guess I just assumed there was a reason for it like the filter seal wasn't as reliable and leak proof as the cap, etc.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 5/46

  9. #69
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    The fuel evaporates but many folks pack stoves in outside pockets.
    All of the stove literature, videos, etc always highlight that the stoves pack down inside their cook pot. Obviously that saves space but isn't that a bad idea? If drops of fuel drip out I'd assume you don't want it leaking onto the cook surface you'd be drinking and eating from. Another thing I thought of after receiving the stove
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 5/46

  10. #70
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiguy View Post
    I'd just leave the pump in the bottle. It does look like it comes with it's own sack but you might want to wrap it in another stuff sack. I usually bring a pair of thinner gloves for handling my white gas stove. You can store them in the same bag as the stove along with a rag. Any which way your going to deal with some residual gas when handling the pump.

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    Yah the stuff sack is pretty decent. Unzips and has a draw string and it has multiple compartments in it to organize stuff. That's a good tip putting some stove specific gloves and a rag in there.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 5/46

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    All of the stove literature, videos, etc always highlight that the stoves pack down inside their cook pot. Obviously that saves space but isn't that a bad idea? If drops of fuel drip out I'd assume you don't want it leaking onto the cook surface you'd be drinking and eating from. Another thing I thought of after receiving the stove
    Between cooking, cleaning, and the nature of white gas, it'll evaporate long before it ever reaches your lips but I put everything in a plastic ziplock before it goes into the pot anyway.

  12. #72
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Another question: for a multi-fuel stove can you mix fuel types or do you have to drain and clean to switch? The Nova has a universal nozzle so you don't need to physically switch nozzles when changing fuel types unlike the MSR models. So I'm imagining this hypothetical scenario: you have about 2 oz of white gas left in fuel bottle. You luckily find a small general store that doesn't have white gas but does have kerosene. So can you just pour the kerosene in with the white gas or do you need to use up the last 2 oz of white gas and then add kerosene. I assume you shouldn't mix (but I've seen forums suggesting it can be OK) and this scenario would be highly unlikely for me but I was curious, more for safety reasons than performance.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 5/46

  13. #73
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    I would think it's no problem mixing. Kerosene is cleaner diesal. Diesal is sludgier gasoline. Not much difference between petroleum types.

  14. #74
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    I didn't see any specific warning in manual not to and the Nova filter assembly has on on/off knob at the pump so I wouldn't think it would leak. Instructions all have the stove being completely broken down for storage so I guess I just assumed there was a reason for it like the filter seal wasn't as reliable and leak proof as the cap, etc.
    It better be more reliable because it is under pressure.

    Tim

  15. #75
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish View Post
    It better be more reliable because it is under pressure.

    Tim
    Just to expand on this thought, is there any reason not to just keep it set up like this all the time? (i.e. just leave the fuel filter screwed into the fuel tank at home, in the car, on the trail,etc). When you said you keep it in the fuel tank did you just mean on the trail or all the time? EDIT: I was thinking in terms of transportation laws while driving but also safety.

    And yet another question - many people mention taking a disc of plywood or similar item to sit the stove on in the snow. Is there any reason to not use metal - in particular another pot or pan you already have? Does metal get too hot and create an overheating situation? The pot set I have has a pretty nice frying pan/shallow pan with it (which I tend to put my hot freezer bag in to eat out of anyway) so I was thinking I'd just flip it over and sit stove on it (my pot set came in a coozie type carrier which I could use to eat out of instead of pan lid). It can obviously take the heat but I didn't know if it would absorb heat and direct it upward. Would be a horrible idea with a canister stove but with the fuel bottle off to the side and maybe partially protected by a wind screen I'm thinking it would be easier because I'll already have that pan. Wouldn't need to drag along another item. Just curious.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 5/46

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