PDA

View Full Version : Northeast Kingdom Wind Farm



dms
03-11-2006, 08:31 AM
The proposed wind farm for East Mountain has been turned down. www.boston.com/news/local/vermont/articles/2006/03/10/hearing_officer_recommends_against_east_haven_wind _farm/ What's interesting is that the summit of East is home to several derelict buildings, some 4 stories high, from an old radar base. It will be interesting to see how this plays out. The question is, will local opposition be able to overcome outside corporate interests. BTW, views from the roof of the 4 story building are spectacular.

Dennis C.
03-11-2006, 11:01 AM
I always looked at East Haven Mountain as sort of a hiking novelty. I visited there twice, both times bushwhacking up from the north. With all the old junk buildings up there, this was probably the best chance to get this site cleaned up and provide a clean power source to the area as well.

"In short, I conclude that while this may be the right project, it is in the wrong place," Janson wrote. Typical lament .... "Not in my back yard ....". This is the right place .... right time too.

RoySwkr
03-12-2006, 01:46 PM
It is rare for me to agree with VPIRG and CLF, but like Dennis I think this could make the site more attractive not less.

I hiked 7 miles up the road in light drizzle, did not dare to go into buildings alone.

bill bowden
03-13-2006, 12:49 PM
If not here, then where can a power plant be sited? It presently resembles an abandoned dump with no remediation.

Stan
03-13-2006, 01:12 PM
People who are concerned with the environment often refer to "sustainability" as a threshold to pass when making economic and environmental decisions.

Wind power is sustainable as an energy source. Wind power in undeveloped, wild or pristine areas is not sustainable without great loss of the land resource.

I hope we have learned from development patterns along rivers, then railways and now highways that decisions we make up front have an irreversible impact. Before we industrialize our ridgelines and shorelines we must ask, is it sustainable? If four wind towers can be justified, why not 40, why not 400?

Without making any judgements about the site in question here, I do feel we must set the bar very high of what is lost to wind industrialization and whether it can more economically and more sustainably be done in some other way. I can state from experience that we can save upwards of 30% or more of our energy use in conservation measures in buildings and transportation. We also have a tremendous capacity for renewable on-site electric generation.

Let's exhaust these other possibilities before we start inundating our hills and beaches with windmills. Then, let's strategically pick locations that can be surrendered to development without robbing us of what we so desire to preserve in the first place.

TCD
03-13-2006, 02:33 PM
I think we should carefully bear in mind that the proposed wind farm **adjoins land that is in private ownership, intended for sustainable forestry.** Coincidentally, the land was once owned by Champion, and some other Champion lands in other locations are now wildlife preserves. During the conversation, we have jumped pretty quickly to discussing this site as if it were “state land” or “wildlife preserve”, or “wilderness.” That’s a mighty long jump. Based on that approach, most areas in the country would be off limits to any kind of development.

I will watch this case with interest because it relates to the proposed wind farm in the Adirondacks, in North Creek. There, a wind farm is proposed on mining company land, that has been in private ownership for hundreds of years, has been strip mined, and already has a road and the necessary power lines. Some parties are opposing it because “you can see it from Wilderness locations.” Now, from the somewhere in the higher peaks in any NE state, you can see pretty much every location where you might ever want to build something, so once again, the precedent being suggested is “you can’t build anything, anywhere.”

dms
03-13-2006, 02:42 PM
TCD, the site of the proposed turbines is in fact in private ownership, the company involved owns the entire mountain. The land was purchased on speculation that the necessary approvals would be issued. There is a state park nearby however. My understanding is that there was a lot of local opposition for all types of reasons. I have been up there twice and the site itself is really littered with decaying buildings and all sorts of debris.

TCD
03-13-2006, 04:10 PM
Thanks, dms. I couldn't tell for sure from the news article.

I don't know all the reasons for opposition to this particular project, but the primary reason the hearing officer gave for opposing the project was that protected lands were nearby. That sets a frightening precedent; it says borders are no longer borders, but that the protected status of a nearby area can "reach out and grab" your project plans from some undetermined distance (maybe even sight distance, as some suggest in NY).

dms
07-18-2006, 10:25 PM
The VT Public Service Board yesterday rejected the application to build four 329 foot turbines on the summit of East Haven Mountain. In a 108 page decision, the board said that the developer had not presented sufficient evidence to show that the turbines would not hurt populations of migratory birds and bats that frequently fly in the area of the site.

JCE
07-19-2006, 09:00 AM
When we did Redington a few weeks ago, just before getting to the summit we ran into 3 guys coming down with equipment.

They were "the wind guys". The tower that was up on Redington is still there but down on the ground. They said they planned to raise it again to measure the wind speed, duration of winds, and direction.

The next morning we ran into about 8-10 of the wind guys at the Stratton dinner for breakfast. They showed us their "plans". It included about 20-30 wind generators along the summits and ridges of places like Redington and Black Nubble.

That day we hiked Sugarloaf and Spaulding. We ran into a local on the trail and somehow got talking about the wind farm. She said "no decisions have been made and it will be a fight to have the farm approved".

/JCE

jrbren
07-19-2006, 11:45 AM
People who are concerned with the environment often refer to "sustainability" as a threshold to pass when making economic and environmental decisions.

Wind power is sustainable as an energy source. Wind power in undeveloped, wild or pristine areas is not sustainable without great loss of the land resource.

I hope we have learned from development patterns along rivers, then railways and now highways that decisions we make up front have an irreversible impact. Before we industrialize our ridgelines and shorelines we must ask, is it sustainable? If four wind towers can be justified, why not 40, why not 400?

Without making any judgements about the site in question here, I do feel we must set the bar very high of what is lost to wind industrialization and whether it can more economically and more sustainably be done in some other way. I can state from experience that we can save upwards of 30% or more of our energy use in conservation measures in buildings and transportation. We also have a tremendous capacity for renewable on-site electric generation.

Let's exhaust these other possibilities before we start inundating our hills and beaches with windmills. Then, let's strategically pick locations that can be surrendered to development without robbing us of what we so desire to preserve in the first place.

This pretty much sums up my view point. Cantdog, I assume you would be fine with these windmills outside your bedroom window ? Somehow I doubt it. They are big, ugly and noisy, make no mistake about that. The NE kingdom is being chosen because it is relatively unpopulated and not an affluent region to fight outside interests politcally. How about everyone have their own windmill in their own yard, you generate what you need yourself, rather then some giant wind farm out of sight and mind of the large population areas. I suspect wind power's popularity (in its present form) would lose popularity in a hurry then.

dug
07-19-2006, 12:19 PM
How about everyone have their own windmill in their own yard, you generate what you need yourself, rather then some giant wind farm out of sight and mind of the large population areas. I suspect wind power's popularity (in its present form) would lose popularity in a hurry then.

I would personally love to build my own windmill to generate my own power. Anything I can do to minimize my dependancy on others, and those associated costs, would be welcome. Just my coupla' penneez.