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Tuco
05-26-2006, 11:32 AM
I was thinking about the Everest thread and the basic discussion seems to be that as one who attempts Everest (or any 8000m summit for that matter), you have to be accept the risk of death and allow that others around you die with nothing you can do for them. Based on this. I have a question….

Assuming no administrative issues- would you Attempt Everest? Money issues aside, time off from work issues aside, family issues aside and assume you are fit enough.. I am curious to what extent the general hiking public- assuming who that’s who we are- would risk such an attempt.

I can tell you that with over a 1 in 10 chance of not making it back (based on an article I read showing summiters to those who died), no way for me. Those odds don’t add up for me and there are plenty of other challenges or things for me to do. I also believe that I would not sleep at night if others didn’t make it along the way- not a fault issue, but a helpless guilty sick feeling…

Feel free to post your thoughts on the why’s…..

KMartman
05-26-2006, 11:35 AM
I would like to think that I would attempt it not matter the stats....I also hope that if a member of my expedition were to fall "ill" and need rescue I would certianly help.....

M

giggy
05-26-2006, 11:56 AM
yea - I think I would. I mean - it is super bowl of climbing. The sights you would see, the feeling of accomplishment etc. If given the opp, I would give it shot.

This is assuming - I had the resume to do this. If asked today -I would have to say no , I am not ready and I would like to do some stuff in the 18-22K ele range first and see how the air effects me. I don't have expedition skills either - how to set up and move camps. Its just a huge difference from camping out 2 nights and camping out 3 months.

but assuming I had the resume and ample time to train - I would give it shot. Even if you got only to basecamp - the sights and what you learn would be something always to remember.

In all honestly - cho oyo, broad peak, Pumori, and Ama Dablam have always interested me more than everest - not sure why.

Tom Rankin
05-26-2006, 12:04 PM
Assuming no administrative issues- would you Attempt Everest? Money issues aside, time off from work issues aside, family issues aside and assume you are fit enough.. I am curious to what extent the general hiking public- assuming who that’s who we are- would risk such an attempt.
Even if I could get past all of the aforementioned issues (which I VERY highly doubt), NO WAY!!!

I don't mind taking a few well calculated risks when I hike, but to go to a place with that high a risk of death is not for me.

adirobdack46r
05-26-2006, 12:06 PM
I had to go with "no". It would be an accomplishment of a lifetime. But I can be very honest and say that it is far beyond my abilities. Danger is everywhere, look how many thousands die each year in outo accidents, doesn't stop me from driving though. I think for me it is the extreme cold temps and conditions. Call me a whimp but that scares the hell out of me. I know I would be a casualty up there of the cold so I'd never attempt it because I'd just be a problem for the rest of the party.

truepatriot09
05-26-2006, 12:10 PM
If you could put aside money, work and family issues? There would be no doubt I would be there. The risk doesn't have to be as high as the stats say. I recently got to hear Ed Viesturs speak and the way he approaches big climbs is the way to go. He listens to the mountain it seems in a way others don't. The climb isn't about the summit, it's about the journey to an amazing place. I think if you treat it that way, you can turn around if you feel the conditions aren't ideal.

I'll be attempting Rainier this summer, so afterwards my mind could be changed, or I could be even more gung ho, but as of right now? Let's do it.

cbcbd
05-26-2006, 12:23 PM
Pretty much what Giggy said...

Sure, I'd try it. Right now? No. I would like to build my skills and "resume" before attempting something like that. I wouldn't like to pay just to get my ass on top my first time wearing crampons.

Other more technical peaks strike my interest more than Everest does anyway, so I'd probably be more inclined to do those first - and there are so many of these peaks and routes out there that seem much more exciting and challenging and cost a hell lot less...

sleeping bear
05-26-2006, 12:23 PM
Family issues aside and money issues aside? I'd have to say I think I'd go for it. I have zero experience on big mountains, but it would be frickin cool. Maye in another life.

kerry13
05-26-2006, 12:35 PM
Absolutely no aspirations to spend days on end in sub zero temps while trying to breath with a gorilla sitting on my chest. However, I could easily be talked into taking one of the two-three week treks from Katmandu to base camp. That would be enough excitement for me.

dug
05-26-2006, 12:42 PM
It's a dream of mine, but it is only a dream. Financial, logistical, and motivational roadblocks will allow this to stay as it is. A dream.

Snowflea
05-26-2006, 12:52 PM
Many reasons:

I like doing stuff whereby I get to go light n' fast, in running shoes. :cool: (Can you say "Let's run the John Muir Trail?") :)

I've never really been one to want to do what everyone else thinks is cool--the highest, biggest, meanest, craziest whatever--but would rather concoct my own adventures. :rolleyes:

I wouldn't want to contribute to the spent O2 cannister/garbage/human waste mess already there.

I have experienced the lack of oxygen at 14,000 feet. I don't want to know what double that--and then some--feels like. :eek: :eek: :eek:

I wouldn't want to emulate Sandy Hill Pittman in any way. :D (Everyone remember her??)

I really hate to be cold!!!

&

Despite my screen name (which is a complete *misnomer*!)..... I HATE TO BE STINKY!!! :o :o :o

Chip
05-26-2006, 12:53 PM
yea - I think I would. I mean - it is super bowl of climbing.
Now YOU I could step over. And I'd take your gloves and jacket !

I voted "No", but I would seriously like to spend a season or 2 there in base camps working with the employed, that'd be excellent. And if I could cherry pick a perfect day, like the couple who got married, I might decide to make an attempt.

dr_wu002
05-26-2006, 12:56 PM
Torngats, baby -- I still got the Torngats in me sights. Anyone wanna go? If someone told me that I had a free trip to somewhere, I think I'd like to go there.

-Dr. Wu

truepatriot09
05-26-2006, 12:57 PM
Funny that the 'mess on the mountain' should be mentioned. At the Viesturs presentation I attended, someone asked how the clean up efforts are going, and the good news is that the mountain is clear of all old debris (gear, bottles et al). The clean up project has been overly successful and though the mountain still is choked with multiple expeditions, the old garbage that used to be on the mountain is no more. So that's a good thing.

Stinkyfeet-
Sounds like you need to seriously get into Adventure Racing! It's so much fun and encompasses all that you seem to enjoy doing. Maybe we should start a VFTT team? Anyone else interested? I'll start a separate thread to accomodate....

Jay H
05-26-2006, 01:19 PM
I would not turn down an opportunity, given your initial assumptions (somebody else's money, enough training, and the time) to climb Everest. I mean, my situation is ideal, never married, no kids, not even an SO. Why the hell not? But given that, I have other mountains I'd rather climb than Everest, but I wouldn't turn down the opportunity to simple be on the mountain with a permit.

Jay

adirobdack46r
05-26-2006, 01:34 PM
Question here!
I don't remember for sure but when I was reading some of the articles that the Everest thread yesterday pointed to, I thought it said that only like 1500 people have made it to the top and 190 deaths. My question is how many have made it to the top multiple times, and how many times? Like guides and sherpas, do they reach the top over and over again with different groups?

David Metsky
05-26-2006, 01:37 PM
A good friend was on an Everest expedition back in the late 80's. She is/was hard as nails, although she wasn't experienced at high-altitidue mountaineering. She turned around at Camp IV.

She said that the entire time you are there it's a daily, painful, slog. There is little time for enjoyment, even you could be comfortable enough to enjoy things. The trip is a grueling deathmarch, everyone tight inside their own cocoon of pain and suffering, too wasted to share things with others. You have to really want it to make it to the top. Besides the physical conditioning, you have to be mentally tough to push on through the constant pain.

Based on that assessment, I would choose to spend my outdoor recreating elsewhere. I've spent a month trekking around Annapurna, and that was much more at my level of enjoyment.

-dave-

pilgrim
05-26-2006, 01:37 PM
Money issues aside, time off from work issues aside, family issues aside and assume you are fit enough...In other words, pure fantasy. No problem, I would do it. I'll accept 90% odds.

David Metsky
05-26-2006, 01:39 PM
Question here!
I don't remember for sure but when I was reading some of the articles that the Everest thread yesterday pointed to, I thought it said that only like 1500 people have made it to the top and 190 deaths. My question is how many have made it to the top multiple times, and how many times? Like guides and sherpas, do they reach the top over and over again with different groups?
I think the record is around 16 times. Most of those records are held by Sherpas who are physiologically better suited to high altitude. You will also notice that most of the double digit summiters have eventually died up there. It's a crap shoot; you can do everything right and still die.

-dave-

Tuco
05-26-2006, 01:54 PM
Based on that assessment, I would choose to spend my outdoor recreating elsewhere. I've spent a month trekking around Annapurna, and that was much more at my level of enjoyment.

-dave-


That brings up an interesting point. I don’t like the odds of not returning, but the sheer effort alone and side effects could be another reason to say no.

Surprised at first to see so many positive votes. I suspect many people feel (and understandably so) that if you make good choices, the 10% chance may be less for you.

The real variable is if a storm hits and there is nothing you can do about it. Plus, one of the things is if you start to have ill affects your decision making can be affected. The image in my mind is from the recent article that the area is called where Inglis diedd is called something like Rainbow Alley because of all the colors of the snowsuits for the people who have died there.

Anyway, I would love to get a first hand account from one of you so hope it happens some day!

adirobdack46r
05-26-2006, 01:58 PM
Turns out it is a small world, I work in a hospital in Watertown NY, 70 miles north of Syracuse, I had heard a rumor someone here at my hospital has a nephew that is a guide on Everest. I just tried to call her to get some specifics but she is off till Wed. By then this thread will have slowed down. I talked to her secretary and she had little info but she did say that his name is Mike and has summited the mountain, she knew he didn't make it on his last attempt. She said he goes all over the world as a guide.

Abster
05-26-2006, 01:59 PM
I might be talked into it.....I can be such a push-over :rolleyes:

In climbing Kili I have been to 19,340ft and although it was slow moving, I felt pretty good.

However, there is the fear of heights issue that would probably rear its ugly head, which could cause some problems in the icefall :eek:

I would prefer to do Aconcagua or maybe one of the other ones Giggy mentioned.

McRat
05-26-2006, 02:00 PM
Meh... I'm waiting for the cog to get built. I'm even willing to loan them ours. ;)

My kids have actually seen enough TV to insist that I not climb Everest, but are still young enough to not realize how out of shape Dad truly is. No kidding.

I'll offer VFTT the same answer I give my kids, "Don't worry, I'm not done exploring my back yard yet."

Probably never will be either.

Double Bow
05-26-2006, 02:00 PM
VFTT Gathering 12.0 location... Everest Base Camp! :D

As one who enjoys pushing myself through times of discomfort and/or pain but who also is cautious, I think I have toughness and brains to better my odds. I would climb an exposed peak with a 10% chance of thunderstorms and I would climb Everest with a 10% chance of my not making it back. The rewards, the views, and the experience as a whole would be well worth the risk in my book (which I'd write after getting back!).

Gris
05-26-2006, 04:34 PM
No way. I agree w/ Beck Weathers & Krakauer. It is a type of sickness, immaturity or complete lack of self-awareness that leads people to attempt peaks like Everest. The people that go have not come to the realization that true happiness comes from within, sharing ordinary moments with loved ones and giving in general. It is a myopic "look at me, look at what I've done!" attitude that leads people to take such foolish risks. I would imagine that the vast majority of those that have perished on Everest came to this realization themselves, albeit a little too late for their liking. :(

NumNum
05-26-2006, 04:39 PM
Someday i will fly higher than Everest!

carole
05-26-2006, 04:45 PM
Nothing about it sounds remotely fun...and if I'm out there I want to have fun.

spaddock
05-26-2006, 05:04 PM
Torngats, baby -- I still got the Torngats in me sights. Anyone wanna go? If someone told me that I had a free trip to somewhere, I think I'd like to go there.

I'd be down with that. I almost drove the Labrador Highway last year for my "vacation".

Two years ago I would have said absolutely no. Now I'm not so sure. Keep upping the stakes as you get more experienced.

But given your parameters maybe. To me the biggest thing would be "family issues". I'm married, and to me that means I have a responsibility to my wife to be around for a few more years.

I think I could deal with the cold. A report DougPaul posted said it was only -38C at the top, I had originally heard -100 (C or F at that point). I know I've endured that temperature before in Winnipeg, where -30C was actually pretty common, and then add in windchill. And like many have said my climbing resume would have to be greatly improved. As to getting your brain kicked in by the altitude, I'm not sure I could handle it, but I'd take the chance and try. If I had to turn back then so be it. But at least give it a go. The thing I'd worry most about is my will to go on. I hate having to turn back, I wouldn't want to make a really dumb decision when my brain is only on limited capacity.

That being said, me my wife and the dog are heading out to Lake Placid tomorrow to conquer the mighty Pitchoff. Hopefully I can breathe without oxygen at the top! ;)


-Shayne

DougPaul
05-26-2006, 05:18 PM
I think I could deal with the cold. A report DougPaul posted said it was only -38C at the top, I had originally heard -100 (C or F at that point).
My guess is that the real temp was -38C (= -36F) and the -100 (whichever) was the windchill.

Doug

blacknblue
05-26-2006, 05:28 PM
I don't think Everest is really my cup of tea. I don't enjoy being so incapacitated for months on end; I just couldn't stay singularly focused for so long and I think the camaraderie would turn into drudgery. Besides that, it is not the most aesthetic of climbs, other than the historic aspect.

Then again, if someone offered to my for my trip today, I probably would have a hard time saying no to such an opportunity. But if someone made the same offer with the choice of Everest, K2, Denali, Ama Dablam, Vinson Massif, or other adventuring options, Everest would not be my first choice.

trailbiscuit
05-26-2006, 05:58 PM
Nothing about it sounds remotely fun...and if I'm out there I want to have fun.
That's exactly why I voted "Heck Yeah." I'm an idiot.
If I felt I had enough mountaineering experience (which I do not), I'd be all over it. Again, I'm an idiot.
Get busy living, or get busy dying.

forestgnome
05-26-2006, 06:05 PM
the good news is that the mountain is clear of all old debris (gear, bottles et al)

Nice!!! I was just about to agree with stinkyfeet; glad it's been cleaned. I've never been impressed with anyone who has hiked to Everest, or anywhere else, if they trashed the place.

Extreme kudos to whoever did that litter detail. Shame on any pig who left trash in such a difficult place to clean. If you're too weak to carry it out, you're too weak.

There's no attraction for me to hike in a place without trees, birds, moose, wildflowers, bears, mushrooms, moss, princess pine, beavers, ferns, lichens, toads, frogs, falcons, coyotes.......

truepatriot09
05-26-2006, 06:40 PM
Gris-
What a grim and misguided statement. While I agree that there are those that climb large peaks with poor intentions (ie Dick Bass) and dillusions of grandeur, there are plenty of others who climb large peaks for the same reasons we climb smaller ones. One shouldn't make such a broad generalization of the intentions of those who go the higher mountains. I'm not trying to stir the pot, just seems to me that not everyone who climbs up high should not be labeled as being either mentally ill or completely self absorbed. Having spoke to those who have climbed the Himalaya, they often tend to be the exact opposite of what you have described.

Again not trying to be the bad guy here, but your comment just seemed a bit harsh to me...

sierra
05-26-2006, 06:44 PM
First off gris are you kidding I hope so. I am a poor climber, Im moving out west in a few weeks for the climbing season and believe me, Im to poor for Everest. In all seriousness, I would not only go if I had the chance, I would summit. I would trade all the boredom, all the hard work, all the time it took, to stand on the summit and yes I would chance my life to do it. To me life is about doing what you love and doing it with all you have in your heart and soul. Quite frankly the people that wouldnt do it could never understand why someone would, that folks is the fundemental diffence between the woulds and the would nots.
Im a very safe climber and currently a serious soloist. Once 2 winters ago on a 14er in CO, I was left 1 mile of sharp ridge in very marginal conditions for a summit I had attempted 5 times previously. I sat there and thought about it for 15 minutes weighing all the possible outcomes. I decided that at that time to test myself, to stick my neck out and use all I had learned in 20+ yrs in the mountains, to go for it and summit no matter what I was not going to stop until I made the summit. I made the summit and made it down. Once to safety I thought about how I had decided to risk my life for a mountain, it was not only one of the most liberating moments of my life but easily one of the most satisfying as well.

chipc
05-26-2006, 07:08 PM
Once to safety I thought about how I had decided to risk my life for a mountain, it was not only one of the most liberating moments of my life but easily one of the most satisfying as well.


"That which does not kill us makes us stronger."

While I might not share Sierra's view on getting to a summit, I can't criticize it either. We all take risks (not only physical) to achieve goals in our lives; when you succeed you are more empowered for the next challenge. So while a climb to Everest (or even Ranier) is not on my radar, I can understand why someone wants to climb it. That being said, achievement of a goal should not come at the expense of someone else.

truepatriot09
05-26-2006, 07:18 PM
well put chipc.... it always comes down to to each his/her own. i for one can't wait to find myself on the flanks of Mt. Rainier this summer...I hope to learn a lot about both mountaineering...and myself...

Danielle
05-26-2006, 07:18 PM
I voted "no." Even though I truly respect those who have summited Everest and those who have tried, I am not sure it is for me. Although I have to admit that I would love to trek to base camp, to get to that part of the world and to see the mountains that I have read so much about. I have always thought that would be just as, or more, worthwhile an experience as climbing Everest itself. :)

bobandgeri
05-26-2006, 07:30 PM
Sounds too much like work and pain for us. We'll stick with the New England peaks for now - maybe Rainier or some Colorado peaks though.

Gris
05-26-2006, 07:41 PM
What a grim and misguided statement.

You're entitled to your opinion. And, i hope, i'm entitled to mine. Perhaps given time you may even feel as i do...

You see, i watch Beck Wethers, crying and saying: god God, what was i thinking coming up here? what was wrong with me. i have a beautiful family, etc., and i see that it he now has things in the proper place in his mind.

I guess the answer is IF your world revolves around yourself, then by all means do whatever makes you happy w/o any regard to others. However, if your world includes caring deeply about others who care deeply about you, then perhaps you consider not taking crazy risks because you know what you could do to them by doing something terrible to yourself...

Doesn't seem like a "grim and misguided" thought pattern to me, seems good hearted and responsible. But maybe I'm too "grim and misguided" or otherwise unenlightened to figure it out for myself.

BTW, TruePatriot, if i may ask, how old are you?

timmus
05-26-2006, 08:01 PM
Torngats, baby -- I still got the Torngats in me sights. Anyone wanna go? If someone told me that I had a free trip to somewhere, I think I'd like to go there.

-Dr. Wu

D'you really wanna do it ? I'm in.

Let's say, July 2008.

As for Everest ? No. Simply because I am waaayyy too lazy to do the training.

Roxi
05-26-2006, 08:13 PM
Nothing about it sounds remotely fun...and if I'm out there I want to have fun.

Exactly! I'm with you Carole! :) There is nothing FUN about climbing Everest, ask anyone who's done it. Challenging yes. Fun no. I hike because it's fun and when it stops being fun, I'll do something else.

truepatriot09
05-26-2006, 08:22 PM
I'm 30, married with a baby. And you're right, Beck Weathers suffered more than he should have. He was a victim of poor decision making by his guides. Had both groups led by Rob Hall and Scott Fischer turned back at the designated turnaround time in '96, the tragedy would likely have been avoided. But ego's and poor judgement came into play and what happened, happened.

I hate to keep bringing him up but when you look at a climber such as Ed Viesturs, who has a wife and three children, and has turned back 300 feet from the summit of Everest as well as abandoning climbs due to poor conditions, or simply because they weren't fun anymore; it proves to me that it's possible to climb responsibly, to make the endeavor fun and to still be a family person who indeed cares about their loved ones.

You are 100% right, people shouldn't take crazy risks when they have others who depend on them. But just because one person thinks an activity is a crazy risk doesn't mean that to another it's just for fun. I know people who think that I hike and climb in winter is a crazy risk...whereas 99.9% of those on this board would never think that. I hope that anyone who engages in outdoor pursuits comes home unscathed; but I also hope that people do take risks, and feel the invigoration of fear once in a while...life wouldn't be much without testing your limits from time to time.

I guess the reason I said what I did is that you touched a nerve by judging folks who choose to climb high and mooshing them together into a self-centered lump. I just don't believe that's true.

Gris
05-26-2006, 08:33 PM
No, i did not say everyone one who climbs period is crazy. i just said most of the people who climb Everest are, yet i even recognized an exception there for guides/pros-types. your view actually sounds very, very much like mine. we both even keep coming back to Beck W as our example. maybe neither of us is grim or misguided... ;)

sapblatt
05-26-2006, 08:37 PM
It is simple for me...I am a hiker - not a mountaineer! Love reading about the stuff, but it is not for me - and I do like winter hiking...

sleeping bear
05-26-2006, 08:41 PM
That's the fun of this thread- if you didn't have loved ones to worry about, and could afford the time and money was no issue... For most of us, it's pure fantasty. Being married I would never go, besides the fact that I could never affrord it. Interstingly enough, I posed this question to my husband and he said he'd go too...

Anyway, just because someone has a family and has the cash, doesn't mean they can't make the choice to go. I don't think it's a matter of thinking that you can beat the mountain and make it out alive, or believing that you will make all of the right decisions, "it won't happen to me". That might border on delusional, since it's proven fact that bad things can and do happen to anyone up there. Accepting the risk, knowing that something bad might happen, and being prepared to deal with the consiquences, even if it means dying doesn't make you delusional, stupid maybe. Maybe it is self centered or selfish, which is why in the first post it was stated that there would be no family issues. It's about overcoming challenge, risk and completing goals, which I guess is ultimately a very personal and self-centered thing.

sierra
05-26-2006, 10:39 PM
Gris I see where your coming from and your points are both articulate and well taken. I have structured my life such that mountainerring is my top priority. Im single and other then my dog Im on my own. My immediate family knows who i am, a mountain climber. Quite frankly if I wasnt off tromping in some hills then they would worry.
The beck weathers incident is amoung the saddest and bravist tales in mountaineering, also Robb hall and his dying phone call brings to light the responsibity of having others to be resposible for and thats an augument I see being made.
Also I think its very important to note that while I might be willing to "stick my neck out" it isnt without much thought and evalution. Many climbers become "blinded" by the summit and pay the ultimate price that list is both long and illustrious.

Davehiker
05-27-2006, 08:17 AM
Not my cup of tea...I'm just too much of a woos! :D

NumNum
05-27-2006, 08:55 AM
Not my cup of tea...I'm just too much of a woos! :D

LOL, your not the only one!!!

C.Tracy
05-27-2006, 04:35 PM
I say NO WAY....I take enough risks at work, and when I "play" to do something like that, and for what? "hey, thats the guy that climbed Mt Everest" :rolleyes: "What else has he done?" I would much rather find a cure for a disease, that would be satisfying :cool:

Seeker
05-27-2006, 10:04 PM
i think it's also important to point out that not just anyone can climb Everest. I guess I am not convinced that just any random hiker who trains like h@ll can make it. You have to have a unique combination of athletic superiority, intense perceverence (sp), and a bit of insanity to make it.

Woody
05-27-2006, 10:42 PM
If I had the opportunity and the cash to pay for the trip I would definately give it a shot. Realizing that there is risk in everything we do, I would try to be as safe as possible. I do want to see my kids have kids. (hopefully not too soon :rolleyes: ) I remember coming down Rainier and asking myself what I was doing up there. As soon as I got down to Camp Muir I was planning my next grand adventure! I figure I take a risk driving down the interstate to work every day. As long as I understand the risks and try to keep them to a minimum I would love to try to climb an 8000 meter peak. Since I am not independently wealthy and have trouble getting two consecutive weeks off of work, I don't think I'll get the chance. (I think I'll go out and buy a Powerball or Megabucks ticket!) I think I have to settle for 14'ers when I can get the time and money to go out west.

Rick
05-27-2006, 11:01 PM
Absolutely no desire. I am afraid I would die of sheer boredom, hanging around in a tent for so long, although I wouldn't mind trekkig into base camp for an overnight. I guess I am an outdoor generalist. I enjoy a bit of everything but am no longer fixated with or obsessed on anything in particular.

Whiteman
05-28-2006, 08:47 AM
The NY Times had another story today: "Dead" Climber's Survival Impugns Mount Everest Ethics (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/28/world/asia/28everest.html) .

As for climbing Everest, with all of those assumptions about being fit and having the cash, I'm up for the assault. I like to think that my 51 years on the planet have given me (at least sometime in the last few years) the sense of knowing when to turn back. I even did it once, on the massive peak in Vermont known as Mansfield (winter, climbed lee side of the mountain, turn-around time reached). I assume the stats for the people who do the "normal" route are a little better than the total grim picture of 10% death rate.

Now, back to breakfast . . .

Gris
05-28-2006, 11:17 AM
I'll stir the pot yet again. I think a HUGE part of the problem is that unlike say Mt. Washington or someplace stateside, the typical climber gets to Everest knowing they will NEVER have another chance. And, with that, there goes all sense of judgment, even to the point of deceiving their guides if they can; true "summit fever" if you will. All for what? Some imagined sense of glory/accomplishment. The whole notion reminds me of my days in youth as a competetive surfer. Had a young friend thought he was fit and savy enough to take on Sunset Beach north shore of Hawaii on a 15+ day. It was his "one shot." Thirty minutes after paddling out he was being revived by the lifeguards on the beach, a way close call, "summit fever" as well if you please... :D

Rols
05-28-2006, 11:59 AM
I am a no vote. Those of you who have hiked with me know I am a hiking conservative (although under the right weather conditions, I do solo in Winter). Probably the biggest reason I would not do it is that I am content hiking the Whites....I get out of them all the joy and satisfaction I need.

I am still laughing to myself that Tuco initiated this thread. On every Winter hike I've accompanied him on he has had long passionate discussions with his snowshoes and crampons (and none of them are complementary). While we hike he can often be heard chanting..."Make Winter go away....make Winter go away".

Tuco
05-28-2006, 02:54 PM
I am still laughing to myself that Tuco initiated this thread. On every Winter hike I've accompanied him on he has had long passionate discussions with his snowshoes and crampons (and none of them are complementary). While we hike he can often be heard chanting..."Make Winter go away....make Winter go away".

Thanks to Paul, I have been found out :D I guess I should also say assuming you also don't hate the winter ;) But I did enjoy all my winter hikes. And you should have heard what my crampons and snowhsoes have been saying about me....

I am interested in the responses about knowing when to turn back, etc. One of my fears would be that decision making, even for those who are level headed could be thrown off by the conditions. I don't know if thats true but thought that it could be so..

Paradox
05-30-2006, 06:06 PM
There are to many interesting things to do in this world to give up such a large part of it to one endeavor. The moment of victory might last 2 minutes, much of that spent looking through a camera lens documenting it. In the Whites I can spend an hour or more on top of a mountain taking in the view, eating lunch, scratching my dogs ears,... scratching other stuff that needs scratching.

Nah, the death rate is too high and the guys that survive often have perfectly good body parts turn black and fall off. The Northeast is wicked good in my book.

LenDawg
05-31-2006, 12:06 AM
I answered could be talked into it. I think Giggy said it best with the superbowl reference. But I also think of it this way: Some mornings, I feel like I can climb Everest. By evening, I have troubles climbing the stairs. And like the Superbowl where I can only imagine myself throwing touchdown passes, so can I only imagine myself climbing Everest.