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woodstrider
06-07-2006, 02:51 PM
This thread begged to be opened from one that I saw Dave had closed down on the Q&A. So everbody, lets stay on topic

What are some of your most enjoyable reads on the subject of wilderness/adventure/travel/nature writing? Open to fiction and nonfiction.

Here are some of mine-

Touching the Void
The Savage Mountain

Leaves of Grass

sleeping bear
06-07-2006, 03:13 PM
Great Heart (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1568361688/sr=8-1/qid=1149707306/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-2191231-3462408?%5Fencoding=UTF8)
Hands down my favorite book ever! Arguably one of the greatest adventure stories ever. It's really three stories though.

Canoes + Labrador Wilderness 1903 & 1905 + death from starvation + race women v men + more close calls = reading until 4 am when you have to get up at 6 for work.

TDawg
06-07-2006, 04:31 PM
I find myself reading Not Without Peril by Nicholas Howe every year (I don't read much as it is, so that's alot for me :) ).

And theres always Into Thin Air by John Krauker (sp?), but I think the secret is out on that one already.

Into the Wild, also by Jon Krauker is also excellent I thought.

Also there is The Other Side Of Everest by Andy? Dickinson. About the same storm in 1996 as Into Thin Air, but the climbers were going up via the more difficult North Col route.

Anyone read Eiger Dreams by Krauker???? Any good??

4000'er
06-07-2006, 04:36 PM
I also like Not Without Peril by Nicholas Howe.
I know it may not fit here, but I also read The 4000-Footers of the White Mountains by Steven D. Smith and Mike Dickerman quite a bit.

funkyfreddy
06-07-2006, 04:38 PM
"The Monkey Wrench Gang" and many other books/essays by Ed Abbey

"Passing Strange" by Joseph Citro

Books by Rick Bass, Thoreau, many other authors......

Puck
06-07-2006, 04:47 PM
Limit to nature;recent reads
Singing lives of Birds.Donald Krodsma
Mind of the Raven. Bernd Heinrich
I use Manual of Ornithology : Avian Structure and Function by Noble Proctor alot. Also the Sibley's Guides.
The North Woods. Peter Marchand
and many different field guides
Bill Bryson, A Short History of Nearly Everything

I will read an occasional bit of Emerson, Thoreau and Edward Abee.

I have been on a Krakauer kick like the others. Into the Wild and Under the Banner of Heaven.

The Voice of the Dawn: An Autohistory of the Abenaki Nation is on deck for the next read.

pilgrim
06-07-2006, 04:50 PM
Anything by Jonathan Waterman (http://www.jonathanwaterman.com/) . The "other" Waterman.

Roxi
06-07-2006, 04:59 PM
I know it may not fit here, but I also read The 4000-Footers of the White Mountains by Steven D. Smith and Mike Dickerman quite a bit.

I love this book and consult/read it when planning every NH 4K ft'er hike.

poison ivy
06-07-2006, 05:07 PM
Among my favorites are:

"Mawson's Will" by Lennard Bickel -- an incredible South Pole survival story.

"Arctic Dreams" by Barry Lopez is a fascinating look at the animals and people of the arctic region. My husband, however, was glad when I finished this one because I kept telling him endless arctic facts at dinner. :) None of Lopez's other books captured me quite as much as this one.

"West with the Night" by Beryl Markham -- a woman who grew up having all sorts of adventures in Africa and later became a bush pilot in Africa in the 1930's. I've read this book a half dozen times and never get tired of it.

"The Long Walk" By Slavomir Rawicz -- story of an escape from a Russian gulag (questions have been raised whether this was a true story, but it's fascinating nonetheless.)

"Desert Soliatire" by Edward Abbey -- a must-read as far as I'm concerned.

I'll read just about anything John McPhee or John Muir have written as well as any polar adventures.

I read Eiger Dreams but didn't like it as much as Krakauer's other stuff.

- Ivy

Bob
06-07-2006, 05:08 PM
autobiography by David Roberts.

Also 'Losing the Garden' by Laura Waterman- sort of off topic here, deals with her life with Guy Waterman.

jjo
06-07-2006, 05:10 PM
Agree with TDawg and 4000er. I loved not w/o peril and all of S. Smith's books esp "4000ftrs of wh Mts " and "Wanderings in the Wh Mts". I also love an old book (s) by W. Collins O'Kane called "the Cabin" and "Beyond the cabin door". He also wrote an old guide book to the White Mtns which is also out of print and I'm trying to find. Also loved "forest and Crag", "Into the Wild" and recently read "alone in the Wilderness"(cannot remeber the author's name-he spend 20 yrs in the Alaskan wilderness alone in a cabin he built w hand tools-Great book-also A DVD). The AMC wh mtns guide is also good reading when uyou live in the Midwest and pine for those wonderful woods/peaks. I guess I like to read about hiking when I'm not :) :D

poison ivy
06-07-2006, 05:16 PM
recently read "alone in the Wilderness"(cannot remeber the author's name-he spend 20 yrs in the Alaskan wilderness alone in a cabin he built w hand tools-Great book-also A DVD).

That's Dick Proenneke... and I agree both the PBS special and the book are terrific. The book was written from Proenneke's journals by his friend Sam Keith. The book is called "One Man's Wilderness: an Alaskan Odyssey"... I think the DVD is called "Alone in the Wilderness" though.

- Ivy

jjo
06-07-2006, 05:31 PM
Here's the website for Dick Proenneke http://www.dickproenneke.com/

I agree, poisin ivy. Outstanding book AND DVD!!

funkyfreddy
06-07-2006, 05:38 PM
1491 by Charles Mann is another fascinating book I recently read.... it deals with all of the latest historical research into what the North and South American continents looked like so long ago.

coldmountain
06-07-2006, 05:47 PM
Edward Abbey, John Muir, Gary Snyder, H.D. Thoreau, Robert Service, Basho, Han Shan (duh) Robinson Jeffers, Wendell Berry, Edna St. Vincent Millay. Tom Brown. D.T. Suzuki, Aldo Leopold.
Huge Peter Matthiessen fan too.

Strictly local; I like Lucy Crawfords history of the Whites, anything from Dickerman or Smith of course, Daniel Doan.....Nick Howe.
Dont Die On The Mountain is indispensible along with any of the Watermans work. Also Goodmorning Midnight by Chip Brown.(difficult to put down).

Have read all the obligatory Krakauer stuff. (Eiger Dreams is my favorite I guess).
I recently read a book about the search for and discovery of Mallory and Irvine on Everest. Amazing background stuff on Mallory. He was one driven english dude.

Anything I can get my hands on I suppose.

Also a big fan of Pete Hickeys bike/trip reports.

sweeper
06-07-2006, 06:12 PM
Tom Wessels "Reading the Forested Landscape"

David Carroll "Swampwalker's Journal"

Kevin Gardner "The Granite Kiss"

Robert Thorson "Exploring Stone Walls" & "Stone by Stone"

And Thoreau "From the Maine Woods" -Ktaadn & "Walking"

All good New Englnd authors

TMax
06-07-2006, 07:12 PM
Here are two books I read recently that were outstanding;
Minus 148 Degrees by Art Davidson about the first winter ascent of Denali and Desire & Ice by David Brill about a "normal" guys preparation for and climb of Denali. (Can you see the theme here;)...any idea what I'm psychologically prepping for?:D)

Michelle
06-07-2006, 09:05 PM
Recently read "Between a rock and a hard place" by Aaron Ralston (the guy who had to cut his arm off while pinned under a boulder in CO) That was pretty good reading, nice and graphic...with pictures!!

A journey North was pretty good ...adrienne hall
I was addicted to reading books on the AT for a few years, so I thought they were all good....and have quite the library now.

Sheomet
06-07-2006, 09:32 PM
One of my favorites is A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson, and I also like the forementioned The 4000~Footers of the White Mountains

JohnL
06-07-2006, 09:39 PM
Mawson's Will. I thought I was the only one who read that. I read that about 25 years ago (yeh, I'm old) and I was transfixed.

Winter World by Bernd Heinrich. Wonderful book on the intracacies of nature.

On The Beaten Path by Robert Rubin. Another interesting AT story.

Seven Pillars of Wisdom by T.E. Lawrence. The Arabian desert in all its dryness (British and environmental) and outstanding cultural clarity.

Snow In The Kingdom by Ed Webster. The best Everst book I ever read.

In The Ghost Country by Peter Hillary & John Elder. An captivating story of a tortuous crossing of Antarctica with people you don't like.

The Adventures of Theodore Roosevelt by T.R. Exerpts from TR's numerous books about his ranch out west, hunting in Africa, warring with the Rough Riders in Cuba and river exploration in Brazil.

Anything by Joe Simpson.

The Seven Mountain Travel Books by William Tilman and the Six Mountain Travel Books by Eric Shipton. Mountaineering, travel and adventure on a shoestring with typical British understatement. Great reads.

JohnL

dougb
06-07-2006, 10:06 PM
The Earth is Enough by Harry Middleton - not quite hiking, but it gets to the point of what people can get out of nature.

I also like reading guidebooks, even if I never will hike in the areas.

Anything by Berd Heinrich. John McPhee's "Controling Nature."

And of course, "A Walk in the Woods." Little Debbie has never looked the same since.

Woody
06-07-2006, 11:07 PM
As BOB mentioned previously - On The Ridge Between Life and Death by David Roberts is a good read, especially if you are interested in Mountaineering. Another book that I just read is The Last Season by Eric Blehm. It is very well researched and written.

Puck
06-07-2006, 11:18 PM
Aren't threads like this great? It is like grabbing the book review section from the sunday paper...It good to see what everryone is reading now and then. so different then the Dan Brown type lists.

Toe Cozy
06-07-2006, 11:20 PM
Tom Wessels "Reading the Forested Landscape"

For anyone who hikes in New England, I think this is a fantastic book. It has really given me a greater appreciation of the landscape that some of the lower trails cover. I second this as a good New England read.

Artex
06-07-2006, 11:34 PM
"A Year in the Maine Woods" by Bernd Heinrich. Nature observations made from the University of Vermont zoology professor in the woods surrounding his cabin in western Maine.

"One Man's Owl" by Bernd Heinrich. Author chronicles his adventures raising a rescued great horned owl.

"Why We Run: A Natural History" by Bernd Heinrich. A look at the evolution of running in humans and how we compare to other species in nature.

"The Long Walk" By Slavomir Rawicz. Poison Ivy also recommended this book... it is a great tale!

"Ada Blackjack: A True Story of Survival in the Arctic" by Jennifer Nevin. An Inuit woman is hired to help an expedition out on Wrangel Island off the coast of Siberia, and ends up being the sole survivor.

"Into The Thin Air" by John Krakauer. I don't think a synopsis is needed, but it's one of my favorites.

"Into the Wild" by John Krakauer. Haunting tale of an idealistic young man who dies trying to survive in the Alaskan wilderness.

Raymond
06-08-2006, 04:51 AM
I recently read ‘‘Wandering Home’’ by Bill McKibben. It’s earned 4-and-a-half stars on Amazon, but I found it dull, dull, dreadfully dull. It is short, just 160 pages. The Adirondack section was better than the Vermont part.

‘‘Deborah and The Mountain of My Fear,’’ by David Roberts.

How about ‘‘The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency’’ and its (so far) six sequels, by Alexander McCall Smith? They’re not about hiking, but they are set in Botswana, so that counts for something, and they’re wonderful books.

Neil
06-08-2006, 06:30 AM
"Wilderness and the American Mind" - Roderick Nash
An in depth history of the evolution of attitudes towards wilderness. Fascinating . Should be required reading for anyone who steps on (or off) a trail.

sleeping bear
06-08-2006, 08:40 AM
"Wilderness and the American Mind" - Roderick Nash
An in depth history of the evolution of attitudes towards wilderness. Fascinating . Should be required reading for anyone who steps on (or off) a trail.

I'll second this one.

chuck
06-08-2006, 09:28 AM
I second Artex on anything by Bernd Heinrich I really like the way he writes he is obviously very smart and scientifical but brings you along on his discoveries making you feel like you could find the same things out yourself just by spending some time a wood. After reading him I look at my surroundings differently. I think I have figured out some things about tent caterpilers I watched devouring a beech sapling I transplanted that I would not have noticed if I did not read him (he is also a ultra? long distance runner).

Was lucky enough to find a copy of Paul Doherty's "Smoke of a Thousand Campfires" through the library system very interesting about Northern NH life, game wardens, hiking and rescues. Believe its out of print.

King Phillips War the one by Eric Shultz and ???Tougias. part of the book is history and the other part maps out where everything in the book took place you can go and find these mostly forgotten sites mainly in southeastern MA funny to find 3 great great great etc.. grandfathers in the index. More Americans died in this war Per Capita than any other (per capita is the key).
I put it here in hiking as the part of book on the sites caused me to do some local hiking.

1491- by Charles Mann fascinating - if much of what he writes is true then it it will change my thinking of the "Forest Primeval" in this area as being untouched until the Europeans got here. (great title too)

Oak - The Frame work of Civilization by William Bryant - this one is also and eye opener and a bit overwhelming on how important oak is to everything..... but is seems to be part of what I think is a new Genre of books about a Thing like "Cod" or "Olives" etc... and how they changed the world etc.... etc... there are so many of them out there now. But I can't seem to resist them . I think they all need to be taken with a grain of salt.

Lastly, Waterman's "Forest and Crag" This is a important(to Northeast hiking) book I think if they did not make this a lot of the info in it would have been lost forever.

coldfeet
06-08-2006, 10:04 AM
Great thread, I need to read more....

Being an elementary teacher a friend gave me a short 5th grade book (130 pages)...called "Hatchet"...written by Gary Paulsen....it's about a young boy app 13 who survives a plane crash and ends up in the Canadian woods....it's a survival story.....the author wrote a series about this boy wanting to return back to the woods and he does....The author has experienced so many things in the outdoor he includes them into the series, moose, bear, blackflies....

Since i'm new to the great outdoors it kept me very interested and wanting to read more, guess that's what the author hopes for...

Guess it's time for me to pick up a 6th grade level soon :cool:

ps...my daughter likes it when i read it to her, me too!

cp2000
06-08-2006, 10:41 AM
"The Monkey Wrench Gang" and many other books/essays by Ed Abbey
.

I second that. :D

jjo
06-08-2006, 10:42 AM
This is a GREAT thread....

chuck
06-08-2006, 10:59 AM
Forgot to mention "Killing Dragons" The conquest of the Alps by Fergus Fleming its a history of mountaineering in the alps but is also the start of climbing and hiking mountains as a past time.

Jay H
06-08-2006, 11:20 AM
Might as well post some kayaking/sailing related ones:

On Celtic Tides by Chris Duff, about a circunnavigation of Ireland by a kayak

To further the Jon Waterman list (no relationship to Guy), I've read:

Arctic Crossing: A very good book on the northwest passage by kayak

A Most Hostile Mountain: Waterman's book on an attempt at sailing the inner passage and then climbing Mt Elias in Alaska.

Where Mountains are Nameless: About the whole ANWR thing. (not kayak related)


I'm currently reading The Only Kayak by Kim Heacox

This is somewhat kayak related and about Glacier Bay, however, it seems more like Alaska conservation more than about kayaking itself. An interesting read so far, though the writing style is about average.

Amicus
06-08-2006, 11:50 AM
Jon Krakauer's "Into Thin Air" - his account of the tragic May 1996 Everest expeditions that killed 8 - seems to be about the most cited book and that's understandable - I couldn't put it down when it came out. A year or two later, however, someone gave me a copy of "The Climb," based mainly on the notes and journals of that expedition by Anatoli Boukreev, the Russian climber who was a guide for one of the expeditions and features prominently but not very creditably in the Krakauer book.

Boukreev himself died within a few years on a different peak in the Himalayas, and the book is supplemented with remarks from other expedition members that lend some support to "his version." I'm in no position to judge. I'm not a mountaineer and suspect this topic has been much debated by them in their own forums, but after reading "The Climb" my attitude toward "Thin Air" and to Krakauer is not the same (and I see that JBrown made a similar comment on a prior thread). The book is a good read in its own right.

Pat T
06-08-2006, 12:28 PM
An Adirondack Passage: The Cruise of the Canoe Sairy Gamp by Christine Jerome is a beautifully written book--part history and part contemporary. Jerome and her husband retraced the canoe route of "Nessmuk", George Washington Sears, in the late 19th century. Theirs was not a death-defying adventure but it was a thoughtful one and she moves back and forth in the book between describing her trip and recreating for us a picture of what early Adirondack guides experienced. This is a great book to take on a trip to the ADKs this summer.

And I second the recommendation of Minus 148. Read this one if you plan to travel to Alaska.

Pat T

poison ivy
06-08-2006, 12:47 PM
Might as well post some kayaking/sailing related ones

I'll just add one more sailing book to Jay's excellent suggestions: "The Stange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst" by Nicholas Tomalin & Ron Hall -- about a man who participated in the race to be the first person to sail around the world solo and disappeared off his boat. It's a really interesting read.

- Ivy

Hampshire
06-08-2006, 01:57 PM
Coincidentally, I'm rereading "A Voyage for Madmen" by Peter Nichols, which chronicles the race. This is a great book as well.

Pucknuts61
06-08-2006, 02:12 PM
I'm surprised it took until the second page of these posting's to find Bryson's "A Walk in the Woods", and Watermans' "Forest and Crag"

For those that are into the 96 Everest tragedy check out Beck Weathers "Left for Dead" and Brashears "High Exposure". Both good reads with yet another perspective of the tragedy vs Krakuaer and Boukreev's back and forth blame game.

Right now I'm reading "Blessing on the Winds" by Tad Wise....very dry history of prayer flags but includes a cool set of 5 in the cover!

Danielle
06-08-2006, 02:38 PM
I agree with Michelle, I've been obsessed with AT books for the past few years too! I think I mentioned this in another thread, but "Walking on the Happy Side of Misery" by ModelT is a great read. Well written and very funny too :)

My most recent read was "Seven Years in Tibet." Fascinating!

I've read many of the other books mentioned in the above posts, but I've also started a list of books to find in the library! I am always looking for good mountaineering/hiking/adventure books, so thanks for the recommendations everyone!

Gris
06-08-2006, 03:51 PM
Recently read "Between a rock and a hard place" by Aaron Ralston (the guy who had to cut his arm off while pinned under a boulder in CO) That was pretty good reading, nice and graphic...with pictures!! Hey Sherpa, where's my book anyway?!?! Does Michelle got it? :D BTW that was a great read, more so Aaron's other exploits than the amputation hike.

Howevah, If i could only have two outdoors books, they would be:

1 - The Snow Leopard (Matthiesen)
2 - Desert Solitaire (Abbey)

If ya ain't read them thar two, well yer missing out big time... ;)

Halite
06-08-2006, 06:03 PM
Howevah, If i could only have two outdoors books, they would be:

1 - The Snow Leopard (Matthiesen)
2 - Desert Solitaire (Abbey)

If ya ain't read them thar two, well yer missing out big time... ;)


I second both these nominations.

mirabela
04-01-2009, 03:13 PM
I realize this is an ancient thread, but there needs to be a thread like this around.

I'll add a few --

Four Against Everest by Woodrow Wilson Sayre -- out of print but available; details a crazy hairball attempt by three Americans and a Scandinavian at the height of the cold war to sneak overland into occupied Tibet and attempt the then off-limits North Col / Northeast Ridge route on Everest. Incredible what these guys managed to do with just about no resources or support.

Anything by James Ramsey Ullman, novelist & short story writer much of whose fiction is set in the milieu of the mountaineering world in the decades either side of WWII. Like the memoir above, these stories will feed the fourteen year old boy in you.

A Journey on the Crest, Cindy Ross -- classic PCT thru-hiker narrative.

erugs
04-01-2009, 04:40 PM
Do audio books count?

I just listened to "Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why" by Laurence Gonzales and am following that up with one that is a little out of the "nature" category called for here but ties in nicely with the idea of making life-saving decisions: "Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking" by Malcom Gladwells.

Fisher Cat
04-01-2009, 04:43 PM
Smoke From a Thousand Campfires by Paul Doherty, not only a great humorous read, but also a nice person.

Stash
04-01-2009, 06:22 PM
Jack London.

BlackBuffalo
04-01-2009, 07:08 PM
Seven Summits was interesting (first 100 pages), till I gave it to a family member to read.
Geez, even Clint Eastwood knew the guys involved and endorsed the book!!

MikeM
04-01-2009, 07:22 PM
I've read alot of these recommendations. I've liked one so much that I have now read it 3 times. Great Heart, The History of a Labrador Adventure is awesome.

LarryB
04-02-2009, 01:03 PM
Great thread! Here's a couple that I liked that don't seem to be on this list:

Seven Years in Tibet, Heinrich Harrer

This Business of Exploring, Roy Chapman Andrews

adkpooh
04-02-2009, 07:12 PM
Danielle and LarryB both mentioned Seven Years in Tibet by Heinrich Harrier. Don't let the movie keep you from the book. The book is so much different from and better than the movie.

No Place I'd Rather Be - it had some worthy chuckles in it.

JohnL
04-02-2009, 09:18 PM
I’ve read a few adventure books since this thread last appeared. These are some you might enjoy:

Killing Dragons by Fergus Feming. I had never heard of the book but I see chuck had mentioned it earlier in this thread. A very interesting and detailed history of climbing in the Alps.

The Lost Men by Kelly Tyler-Lewis. If you’ve read about Shackleton you probably never read anything about his party that laid food and supply caches from the other end of Antarctica. This is their story. A gripping read about some awful suffering.

Minus 148 by Art Davidson. One of the classics.

Two Years Before The Mast by Richard Henry Dana. A superb read if you’re a sailing buff (and I’m not) and a great read even if you’re not. A 19 yr old Harvard dropout becomes an ordinary deckhand on a brig sailing from Boston, around Cape Horn to California in 1834. One of Nat’l Geo’s 100 best adventure books.

Touch The Top Of The World by Erik Weihenmayer, the blind guy who climbed Everest. You’ll be really impressed by this guy. Not literature but a good story.

Three other Nat’l Geo top 100. All fascinating reads and the prose of de Saint-Exupery is lyrical and you feel the love he had for his work and nature. Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exuprey, Arabian Sands by Wilfred Thesiger and A Short Walk In the Hindu Kush by Eric Newby.

JohnL

Tim Seaver
04-02-2009, 11:54 PM
The Hall of the Mountain King: The True Story of a Tragic Climb (Howard H. Snyder)

Second Ascent: The Story of Hugh Herr (Alison Osius)

No Picnic on Mount Kenya (Felice Benuzzi)

In the Throne Room of the Mountain Gods (Galen Rowell)

Snowflea
04-03-2009, 12:39 AM
The Hall of the Mountain King: The True Story of a Tragic Climb (Howard H. Snyder)

...and the follow ups:

White Winds (Joe Wilcox)

and, much more recently:
Forever on the Mountain : The Truth Behind One of Mountaineering's Most Controversial and Mysterious Disasters (James Tabor). Interesting review by one of the survivors on Amazon, BTW.

Also just read (finally) The Last American Man (Elizabeth Gilbert) which I found rather fascinating.

I really like anything written by Ed Abbey. Still haven't gotten through all his books yet!

Tom & Atticus
04-03-2009, 07:37 AM
The Lure of the Labrador Wild by Dillion Wallace. Fascinating. It was written in 1905 so it is out of print but you may find it in some local libraries if you are lucky.

Plus it starts out with the following segment of Rudyard Kipling's poem "The Explorer". This in itself is wonderful:


"There's no sense in going further - it's the edge of cultivation,"
So they said, and I believed it...
Till a voice, as bad as Conscience, rang interminable changes
On one everlasting Whisper day and night repeated---so:
"Something hidden. Go and find it. Go and look behind the Ranges---
Something lost behind the Ranges. Lost and waiting for you. Go!"

J.Dub
04-03-2009, 08:49 AM
The Lost Men by Kelly Tyler-Lewis. If you’ve read about Shackleton you probably never read anything about his party that laid food and supply caches from the other end of Antarctica. This is their story. A gripping read about some awful suffering.


After seeing a short video presentation about the Endurance voyage at Battleship Cove in Fall River, MA, my 9-year-old son is now obsessed with Ernest Shackleton. He's read everything they had in the youth section of our library (and written a couple book reports thereupon), so I might need to scope this one out for him.


I'm finishing up Susan E.B. Schwartz's Into The Unknown (http://www.amazon.com/Into-Remarkable-Life-Hans-Kraus/dp/0595357520/ref=pd_bbs_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1238762605&sr=8-2), which is a biography of Gunks legend Hans Kraus. It's a compelling read, and presents more of Kraus' life outside his climbing exploits, along with his notable FA's. I never knew he was a pioneering exercise physiologist who was JFK's back doctor during his term in office.

Puck
04-03-2009, 11:28 AM
People mention Bernd Heinrich alot...heads up he has a new book coming ou ina few days. "Summer World"
http://www.amazon.com/Summer-World-Season-Bernd-Heinrich/dp/0060742178/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1238772420&sr=1-4

You heard first at VFTT

gram
08-09-2009, 07:47 PM
Just finished "In the Land of White Death" by Valerian Albanov. Great read, came across it while browsing at my town library.

It's about a ship trapped in ice in the Siberian Arctic in 1914. Couldn't put it down.

redsock
08-10-2009, 10:54 AM
"Roughing It" by Mark Twain.
If I was able to pick someone to spend a night around the campfire with (besides my wife of course ;-)), it would be Mark Twain. I think he would be able to spin some pretty good tales for you!

The Unstrung Harp
08-10-2009, 12:54 PM
Cool thread, glad to share favorites with many of you.

But.

Did I miss it, or has no one mentioned David Quammen? He is probably my most favorite author ever. He writes this incredible short-story-sized pieces on all kinds of nature-y topics. Beautifully, perfectly written. Impeccable balance of zany information, field data, and personal reaction. Please, everyone, go read a few pages of Quammen's "Wild Thoughts From Wild Places", "Song of The Dodo", "Natural Acts", or any of 'em. And fall in love.

blaze
08-10-2009, 01:18 PM
K2: The Savage Mountain by Charles S Houston and Robert H. Bates.

Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage, by Alfred Lansing.

Two great stories of heroism in the face of disaster.

JohnL
08-10-2009, 01:24 PM
I have not read them yet but as I was browsing through an antique store yesterday I was fortunate to find three books from Nat'l Geo's list of 100 Best Adventure Books;
West With The Night by Beryl Markham
South by Ernest Shackleton
The Fearful Void by Geoffrey Moorhouse
I scooped them up and added them to my "To Be Read" pile.

Several weeks ago I finished Walden by HD THoreau. This was my second attempt at reading it and this time I was able to persevere through the awful tedium of his never ending chapter on Economy and into the lovely and detailed descriptions of his observations of the natural world about his time in the cabin on the shores of Walden Pond. A very good read though there are sections of obsessive compulsive dreadful monotony.

JohnL

funkyfreddy
08-10-2009, 01:27 PM
Cool thread, glad to share favorites with many of you.

But.

Did I miss it, or has no one mentioned David Quammen? He is probably my most favorite author ever. He writes this incredible short-story-sized pieces on all kinds of nature-y topics. Beautifully, perfectly written. Impeccable balance of zany information, field data, and personal reaction. Please, everyone, go read a few pages of Quammen's "Wild Thoughts From Wild Places", "Song of The Dodo", "Natural Acts", or any of 'em. And fall in love.

I really like David Quammen as well!

The Unstrung Harp
08-10-2009, 01:48 PM
Goodgoodgood. I totally wub him. I think I get panicky when amazing authors are underloved. :eek::confused::p

LittleBear
08-11-2009, 10:05 AM
North to the Night: A Spiritual Odyssey in the Arctic by Alvah Simon

and

Where the Mountain Casts Its Shadow: The Dark Side of Extreme Adventure by Maria Coffey