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skibones
06-13-2006, 07:37 PM
Does anyone have a favorite kind of water shoe they could recommend. It would need to be light weight to carry in a backpack. Since there are so many water crossings now I thought it might be a good idea to change into them and keep the boots dry for the hike. Looked at kayaks shoes but I'm not sure that's the best option.

Frodo
06-13-2006, 08:55 PM
I like to suffer, so I just go barefoot across streams (I have a picture of Pete Hickey on my wall that I bow to before I leave for work every day) :D

Though a few months ago I crossed a river in Argentina barefoot that I "highly" regretted. The jagged stones were like broken glass and I was just a shell of a man once I reached the other side, rolling around on the ground in agony... :eek:

Tevas work well for what you are inquiring about...

cushetunk
06-13-2006, 09:12 PM
Croc Mocs.

They dry. They're light. They're comfy camp shoes.

And you can be stylish, too.

Dugan
06-13-2006, 10:41 PM
My vote is for a pair of utilitarian ultra-light weight mesh trail runners.

The protect the feet while crossing, yet dry very quickly. Unlike Crocs (which, yes, are very light) mesh trail runners can actually provide enough support to hike in, though I'm not sure I'd want to carry significant weight in them for any great distance.

HuiYeng
06-13-2006, 11:02 PM
I usually bring along my Warmers paddling booties on a spring hike. Although I have never actually need to change into them to cross a stream, but my guess is the booties can keep my feet warmer than clogs, and they fit like socks. But I wouldn't count on them for comfort :( .

They're also inexpensive, light weight, dry quickly and easy to pack.
Something like this. (http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?storeId=8001&catalogId=40000008001&productId=47985057&parent_category_rn=40003786&vcat=OUTLET_SSHP_KAYAKING_CANOEING_LD)

Remix
06-13-2006, 11:38 PM
I got a pair of Salomon Amphibians on clearance. They are basically a mesh sneaker resembling running shoes.

The laces are all nylon, and the lace ends are joined in a plastic drawstring-style friction thing.

Other than the securing the lace ends by friction instead of a knot, there is nothing remarkable about them.

Jay H
06-14-2006, 06:24 AM
One benefit of paddling shoes (or kayak shoes as skibones calls them) is their lack of laces. Many paddling shoes and shoes for kayaking in particular will not have laces cause they can catch on bolts and other odds and end while doing a wet exit from a Sit-in Kayak (aka SinK) which is not good. So one benefit of paddling shoes vrs trail runners is easy of entry/exit. Another big benefit of paddling shoes is a rubber sole that is made to be somewhat sticky on the river/stream/lake bed. Or at least stickier than typical sneakers. Depending on the shoes, a paddling shoe is probably a little more crushable or packable than a trail runner, although since it's ment to be on/off, you might want to simply 'biner it to the outside of your pack anyway, so this might be moot.

One benefit for trail runners is the sole will typically be stiffer than a paddling shoe which is not made for continue walking or hiking, some paddling shoes have a real thin sole which you will feet every pointy rock you hit. A trail runner shoe should be much better in this regard.

You should definitely try on paddling shoes, they are typically made to go sockless so the size you wear with your trail runners or hiking shoes might not be the size you want for paddling shoes.

One benefit of paddling shoes though is that they are typically very cheap, you can find them on STP for $25 for some, although like I said, you kind of should try them on, although if you have the time and patience, STP has a good return policy.

Jay

pilgrim
06-14-2006, 06:29 AM
Keens (http://www.keenfootwear.com/pdp_page.cfm?productID=9)

Good camp shoes, too.

skibones
06-14-2006, 06:49 AM
s
One benefit for trail runners is the sole will typically be stiffer than a paddling shoe which is not made for continue walking or hiking, some paddling shoes have a real thin sole which you will feet every pointy rock you hit. A trail runner shoe should be much better in this regard.

Jay[/QUOTE]
After considering your information I think I may go with the trail runner, but I'm looking for a pair that will be light weight.

marty
06-14-2006, 06:52 AM
If weight outweighs overall functionality, try these:

Neoprene slippers (http://fiddleheadpa.safeshopper.com/14/147.htm?935)

They weigh 2 1/2 to 3 ounces, work ok for stream crossings and if you slip an insole inside them, they function adequately as a camp shoe. The other suggestions provide more functionality, however.

Jay H
06-14-2006, 07:02 AM
After considering your information I think I may go with the trail runner, but I'm looking for a pair that will be light weight.

That really depends on the shoe though. I have two pairs of paddling shoes, one is a Tevas brand and it is very thin and flexible and sole is simply a real thin band of nylon with a rubberized sole for traction on it, it's really flexible to one's feet, kind of like say a ballet shoe. But the other shoe I have is heavier, beefier and has a more serious sole. You can squeeze the heel and toe between your hands and it will resist where as the Tevas I have would practically crush into a ball. You can find some paddling shoes that are beefier though, so keep that in mind.

The one paddling shoe that I do wear for walking is made by Merrill, which also makes the trail runners I have (red slate desert). I live on a lake community and I'm about 3/4 mile from the lake via roads, a trail, and a fireroad. I've used the Merrill paddling shoes and they are comfy to hike in for short distances. You mentioned water crossings, surely you would change off to your hiking boots/shoes after the crossing, right? :)

Jay

Puck
06-14-2006, 08:26 AM
Timely thread.
My son is signed up for a canoe trip with the AMC. A water shoe, could range from an old sneaker to what is being discussed here, is required.

sapblatt
06-14-2006, 08:38 AM
Used to use Teva's, but they are quite heavy...
Recently picked up a pair of pool shoes for $5 at Walmart...very light and quick on and off.

giggy
06-14-2006, 08:55 AM
I got a pair of them keen things last year and wear them for everything - I think they are actually water shoes. love em -

skibones
06-14-2006, 09:10 AM
That really depends on the shoe though. I have two pairs of paddling shoes, one is a Tevas brand and it is very thin and flexible and sole is simply a real thin band of nylon with a rubberized sole for traction on it, it's really flexible to one's feet, kind of like say a ballet shoe. But the other shoe I have is heavier, beefier and has a more serious sole. You can squeeze the heel and toe between your hands and it will resist where as the Tevas I have would practically crush into a ball. You can find some paddling shoes that are beefier though, so keep that in mind.

The one paddling shoe that I do wear for walking is made by Merrill, which also makes the trail runners I have (red slate desert). I live on a lake community and I'm about 3/4 mile from the lake via roads, a trail, and a fireroad. I've used the Merrill paddling shoes and they are comfy to hike in for short distances. You mentioned water crossings, surely you would change off to your hiking boots/shoes after the crossing, right? :)

Jay


I definitely would put my hiking boots back on. I think a must for me is to have a sticky sole in case I lose my balance on a wet slippery rock. Maybe I should practice rock running in the river by my house.

Jay H
06-14-2006, 10:51 AM
Hey Arm, those are the same shoes that I have.. Bought them in Lahouts in Lincoln after last year's traverse so I didn't have to fly home in stinky wet boots!

They do pack down really good but they don't offer much rock protection so really water use only, IMO.

Jay

spaddock
06-14-2006, 10:52 AM
I got a pair of them keen things last year and wear them for everything - I think they are actually water shoes. love em -

I've got a pair too. They could be a bit lighter i think. My feet always sweat on rubber footbeds though :(

What's the deal with the little tag on them that says, "Waterproof"? They are sandals!


-Shayne

Pete_Hickey
06-14-2006, 12:50 PM
Then there is the compromise. It is between going barefoot, and carrying another pair of feet-covers.

Note that this only works with all leather kinds of boots.

Yaske off the boot, remove the sole liner thingy. Remove your sock, put the boot back on and walk across. When opn the other side, dump out the water, put the sole liner thingy (thous things must have a real name) and put back on your dry socks. The all leather boots will absorb very little water, and your feet will be almost dry.

Gris
06-14-2006, 02:20 PM
used to go barefoot - didnt work, too many stubbed toes, cut feet (see Frodo post), etc. Then i started carrying some real lightweight water-type paddling shoes (think Crocs, Keens, etc.) but they didnt seem very surefooted. so... took along a pair of sandals (insert fave brand - Teva, Chaco, et al.) & have never looked back. by far the best all rounder - camp/water, etc. shoe, if you get a good pair. only down side is, like me, you may find yourself hiking further and further in them (ctie - El Bagr...) whilst carrying your "real" hiking shoes/boots on your pack ;) :D ;) :D ;)

KMartman
06-14-2006, 02:51 PM
used to go barefoot - didnt work, too many stubbed toes, cut feet (see Frodo post), etc. Then i started carrying some real lightweight water-type paddling shoes (think Crocs, Keens, etc.) but they didnt seem very surefooted. so... took along a pair of sandals (insert fave brand - Teva, Chaco, et al.) & have never looked back. by far the best all rounder - camp/water, etc. shoe, if you get a good pair. only down side is, like me, you may find yourself hiking further and further in them (ctie - El Bagr...) whilst carrying your "real" hiking shoes/boots on your pack ;) :D ;) :D ;)

I know Chacos are huge with the river rafting set...my buddies been guiding tours for Mad River in WY for the past 5 or more summers...they all swear by them...I find the crocs to be pretty sure footed myself and LIGHT...

M

DougPaul
06-14-2006, 03:20 PM
I know Chacos are huge with the river rafting set...my buddies been guiding tours for Mad River in WY for the past 5 or more summers...they all swear by them...I find the crocs to be pretty sure footed myself and LIGHT...
I have 2 pr of Chacos. If they fit your feet (they have significant arch support), they are very nice, but are a bit heavy. Haven't tried hiking in them (yet?), but I have heard of some who do...

Tried on some Crocs--their sizes go in very large steps. I was mid-way between two sizes and was unable to get a decent fit. (The salesman said that I wasn't the only one...)

Doug

KMartman
06-14-2006, 03:26 PM
Tried on some Crocs--their sizes go in very large steps. I was mid-way between two sizes and was unable to get a decent fit. (The salesman said that I wasn't the only one...)

Doug

I have found this too, but even slightly "big" if you use the strap behind the heel they WILL stay on...plus they are VERY confortable..if im not at work...im in my crocs...

M

sleeping bear
06-14-2006, 03:30 PM
I absolutely LOVE my Chacos (except the are smelly cause I wear em so much :eek: ).

A common problem I found with Tevas was that when they were totally wet, my feet would slip out the front of them if I was going downhill (think sandals strapped around your ankles). Soooo annoying! You can get Chacos with the big toe loop, which prevents that. It feels wierd at first, but you'll get used to it. Because the straps are low profile and sit snugly on the foot, they seem to dry a little faster. And if that isn't enough, I had mine resoled this spring for $35 and had them back in about 10 days (from Colorado). They are a tad on the heavy side- but as mentioned, have really good support. I have hiked in them many times.

I would think though if your going to so far as to carry something just for river corssings, you'd want more foot coverage so you don't stub toes and stuff. But, multi purpose- go with Chacos!

Pete Hickey is right on about removing socks and liners- that's the way to go if you don't want to carry anything extra and want to keep your feet as dry as possible.

Although, I'm starting to like hiking with wet feet. I might just start dousing my boots anyway. :D

TCD
06-14-2006, 03:37 PM
I do some streams barefoot. If I'm not sure about the stream bottom, I carry the cheap ($8) sandals, and clip them on the outside of the pack to drip dry after each use.

Most of my trail runners end up being "mesh" (read "shredded") after a couple years anyway, so I could probably use a pair of those too...

On some approaches (like Walker Brook in the adks) you know you're only going to get wet at the beginning and the end. Wear the sandals and take a towel, cache those in the woods on the other side, and use them again on the way out.

TCD

paul ron
06-14-2006, 03:47 PM
I have been playing with silnylon making just about anything and everything out of the stuff. I had the same problem but instead of having to change my shoes on n off at every crossing I made what I like to call puddle jumpers. I got the idea form these... http://trailquest.net/dlgcgwsocks.html

They are nothing more than long stuff bags made of silnylon, sealed the seams with household GE silicone sealant. They are very light weight. I just slip em on over my boots, right up to my knees held in place by a bungie in the top seam just like waterproof bags, except this is a bit tougher.

I try to rock hop as much as I can so I don't ruin my puddle jumpers, I like to treat them with care since this stuff isn't very thick. I've been using em for 2 years now and only resealed them recently.

skibones
06-14-2006, 05:58 PM
I have been playing with silnylon making just about anything and everything out of the stuff. I had the same problem but instead of having to change my shoes on n off at every crossing I made what I like to call puddle jumpers. I got the idea form these... http://trailquest.net/dlgcgwsocks.html

They are nothing more than long stuff bags made of silnylon, sealed the seams with household GE silicone sealant. They are very light weight. I just slip em on over my boots, right up to my knees held in place by a bungie in the top seam just like waterproof bags, except this is a bit tougher.

I try to rock hop as much as I can so I don't ruin my puddle jumpers, I like to treat them with care since this stuff isn't very thick. I've been using em for 2 years now and only resealed them recently.


It's hard to believe that they weren't slippery on mossy rocks. I tried on a pair of Salomon Amphibians today but didn't buy them because I wasn't sure if they were sticky enough on the soles like the Keen claim they are. Any feedback on these.

paul ron
06-14-2006, 06:27 PM
My puddle jumpers aren't slippery at all. I smeared a thin layer of silicone on teh bottom inside n out so the shoes don't slip around and it gives them a better purchase on rocks. Moss is slippery no matter what you are wearing unless of course you are using the felt bottomed fisherman waders.

Getting water in my boots ends my trip because the foam insulation of the insides gets soaked and become funky by the end of the day. I also hate having prune toes regardless of the socks you use becuase of the increased humidity in the shoes and besides, it actually hurts the second day of sloshing around in wet boots. I'd rather take my chances having dry feet.

blacknblue
06-19-2006, 02:21 PM
Chacos, Chacos, Chacos.

They work perfectly as water crossing footwear, and for donning around the camp at night. I've only hiked in them for short distances (up to about 3-4 miles), but they worked fine for that as well. They will hold up for years (unlike my Tevas), always fit great, have great soles, and Maytag-like customer support.

nartreb
06-19-2006, 02:58 PM
>any feedback on [Salomon Amphibians]?

I've got a pair, I wear them all the time in the summer (when I'm not barefoot or stuck wearing a tie). Better grip on wet rock than any hiking boots I've had; light, comfortable, well-ventilated, quick-drying. I wear these as my regular hiking shoes and just charge through any streams without pausing.

Mike P.
06-20-2006, 12:17 PM
If I'm going multi-day or I know it's going to be over the boots, I'll bring Teva's, (they double as slippers also with fleece socks :D )

If I'm on the way out with a mile or two to go I just walk on through, occasionally like on Memorial day the brook is four or five miles away & I'm passed caring, but my callouses are well formed so I don't worry much about blisters from wet feet anymore.

smitty77
06-21-2006, 08:01 AM
I got a pair of Salomon Amphibians on clearance. They are basically a mesh sneaker resembling running shoes. The laces are all nylon, and the lace ends are joined in a plastic drawstring-style friction thing. Other than the securing the lace ends by friction instead of a knot, there is nothing remarkable about them.
Same here, got them for $28 on clearance at EMS this spring. Mostly bought them for beach trips and hiking but I wore them all day Sunday (because it was so hot) and I found them quite comfortable. They may actually make it into the general summer shoe rotation. Not the lightest, but about the same as my knock-off Tevas from Wally World. I like the soles better, they lace up securely, and your toes are protected so you could actually hike in them between successive stream crossings.

Periwinkle
06-22-2006, 11:19 PM
How do the Chacos compare to a Teva in weight and drying time?

I switched from Tevas to Crocs to shave a little weight. More importantly, the Crocs dry faster. I hated the wet straps on Teva. Wet feet in camp annoy me. Now, I'm finding the Crocs aren't as stable crossing in rushing water and loose gravel and small stones get trapped in the toe.

I might be willing to shell out the big bucks for Chacos if all those straps dry quickly.

DougPaul
06-22-2006, 11:48 PM
How do the Chacos compare to a Teva in weight and drying time?

I switched from Tevas to Crocs to shave a little weight. More importantly, the Crocs dry faster. I hated the wet straps on Teva. Wet feet in camp annoy me. Now, I'm finding the Crocs aren't as stable crossing in rushing water and loose gravel and small stones get trapped in the toe.

I might be willing to shell out the big bucks for Chacos if all those straps dry quickly.
Chacos are 1 lb 6 oz for women's size 8. The straps are polyester and fairly thin so they should dry out fairly quickly. http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&productId=47993241&parent_category_rn=4501265&vcat=REI_SEARCH

Doug

snowbird22
06-24-2006, 07:00 PM
So hiking in sandals like that is ok? Sounds good on the hot days :)

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&productId=47995753&parent_category_rn=0&vcat=REI_SSHP_FOOTWEAR_LD