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Mohamed Ellozy
06-22-2006, 06:21 PM
Today I woke up with severe pain in the front of my knee, and promptly drove to Boston to see my doctor. He diagnosed it as patellar tendinitis (http://www.mgh.harvard.edu/ORTHO/PatellaTendinitis.htm), and told me that there is no real treatment; just rest, ice and analgesics until nature takes its course.

His estimate is that it will be about four weeks before I am able to hike again :( At my age four weeks of inactivity translates into a huge loss of fitness, but I know enough to realize that using an unhealed knee will almost certainly prolong the period of disability. Very frustrating, to say the least.

Does anyone here have any experience with this condition?

dug
06-22-2006, 06:25 PM
Yes, and it sucks. Rest and stretching is all you can do. Head the doctor's warnings, however. Two friends each blew out their patellar tendons eventually because they never stayed off the soccer pitch and rested similar ailments. Unfortunately, hiking is about the worst thing for this type of injury. That downhill pounding can certainly add up.

arghman
06-22-2006, 06:41 PM
no experience but sympathy :(
(having had several musculo-skeletal problems in the past 10 years)
hope you have a speedy recovery & in the meantime can get exercise in other joints/muscles.

audrey
06-22-2006, 07:32 PM
How frustrating! I've had tendinitis in several other places but not the knee, and patience is the key (not that I ever had enough of it). Heal quickly!

trailbiscuit
06-22-2006, 08:13 PM
I've had a touch of that. I was told to focus on stretching my quads. Oh yeah, and rest. (I hate resting.)

One of these might help:
https://secure.cho-pat.com/products/product.php?product_type=26

Good luck.

timmus
06-22-2006, 08:31 PM
I had exactly that once, after a fifteen hours hike. It was all swollen and it was hurting. The doctor said four weeks, I was OK in three. I did some stretching, but that's about it. I believe rest is very important.

Good luck

DougPaul
06-22-2006, 09:14 PM
No experience with patellar tendonitis, but I do have extensive experience with achilles tendonitis. Do what you have to do to get it under control. If you keep annoying tendonits, you can keep "enjoying" it for years...

Given the choice of tendonitis or a broken bone, choose the bone. It will heal in 6-8 weeks--no such guarantees with tendonits.

Light usage, light stretching, and inflammation control are the general methods for promoting healing. (Don't "splint" the joint--light usage is better than no usage.)

One technique that I have found useful for assessing its current state is palpation. Press the affected tendon against the underlying bone with your finger tip[s]--this will enable you to feel inflamation even when it otherwise feels ok.

Good luck,

Doug

Paradox
06-22-2006, 09:17 PM
I am very sorry to hear of your condition. I have very much enjoyed and used your website. This is a link to amazon.com and Tim Nokes: The Lore of Running, 4th edition. His whole focus is to get you back running safely and quickly as possible. His chapter on running injuries is encyclopedic. Pateller tendenitis is a very common runners condition.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0873229592/qid=1151025093/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-3244132-2796902?s=books&v=glance&n=283155

amstony
06-22-2006, 09:17 PM
Mohammed-

Lots of experience with it this year :o . Starting in February I was off it for 63+ days until a few weeks ago. However, I am sitting here tonight typing this having cancelled my 3rd workout in a row due to the pain in the knee. The sports physician did the whole gamut, x-rays, MRI's, etc. They did not want to cut and do arthoscopy because it is not a permanent fix; and nixed a knee replacement (they felt I am too young for that). They had me on pain killers which the docs eventually took me off a few weeks ago.

Ask the doctor about taking Glucoasime (over the counter) which various studies indicate helps (maybe) the muscle grow stronger and he also gave me a set of exercises to do. The best thing to do is stay off it, for me it's helped but it has not eliminated the pain. I can PDF you the exercises if you want, send me a PM if you want them. I also found a knee brace very useful and wear it while hiking and on easy jogs.

Another exercise you can do is swimming, but stay off your feet. Buy a vest or something similiar that enables you to float and then you can exercise the legs without them touching bottom and injuring the knee- but you need access to a pool of course.

I was able to begin workouts again on a slow basis....run a 1/4 mile, hike the Lincoln Trail for an 1/2 hour or so- exciting things like that. I'm in the same boat as you, I work out for fun, stress release from work, and to maintain a high level of fitness. I ran a marathon late last year, and regularly did 12-20+ mile runs for workouts and did lots of hiking.

So sitting around rehabilitating was absolutely horrible, miserable and I was personally depressed. I'm surprised the family is still here!

BorealChickadee
06-22-2006, 10:56 PM
Yes, I've had patellar tendonitis along with two others (ITBS and I can't remember the other) at the same time in the same knee.

Here's my advice: physical therapy, physical therapy, physical therapy

Yes, the pain will go away on its own, eventually... but you want to keep your range of motion. A PT will make sure that you heal with range of motion intact.

Grumpy
06-23-2006, 08:00 AM
Can’t recall exactly what the doc called it, but what you describe as patellar tendonitis hit me the first time several years ago. Woke up about four o’clock on Labor Day morning with my knee throbbing, and badly inflamed. Pain centered front and just below the kneecap. There was no “proximate cause” – I hadn’t done anything outrageously strenuous in the prior day or two, or put undue strain on my legs, or suffered a bump. But there it was.

The pain became so intense I went to the local hospital emergency room. The ER physician on duty that day poked my knee a bit, enough to nearly have me on the ceiling. He theorized that, given my age at the time (mid 50s) it was a calcium deposit particle “floating” around and causing the irritation. X-rays showed nothing of the sort, and in fact gave me a clean bill on arthritic condition. My knees were in very good condition for my age, weight, etc., the doc said. He seemed disappointed about that, fixed me up with a leg brace, prescribed some painkilling dope, wrote a referral to the local orthopedic surgeon, and sent me on my way.

A few days later the orthopedic surgeon did more X-rays, pronounced my knees to be generally in superior condition (all considered, blah, blah, blah), and theorized some kind of tendonitis. He blasted the sore spot with an injection of steroids led by a shot of powerful local anesthetic – I got instant relief. I walked out of doc’s office without the leg brace. The next day I hiked eight miles on flat, easy terrain, without a lick of pain or trouble.

Note well: A few years later I was told that steroid treatment is not highly recommended for this kind of thing.

While hiking on Mt. Mansfield two years ago I had another severe knee episode of similar sort. Same knee. Same place. It gave me minor difficulty both going up and coming down, related, I thought, to some irritation that had developed in the kneecap while I was kneeling on it, loading our van for Mrs. Grumpy’s and my annual vacation extravaganza. Nothing a tough brute like me couldn’t handle, though.

Back at the van after our hike, I did the usual stretches, drank a bottle of beer and snacked on some cheese and crackers, and all was OK. We headed back to camp, and after having been on the road a half hour or so decided to stop and pick up a bottle of wine to drink with evening’s din-din. Straightening my leg as I stepped down from the van, the pain in my knee was absolutely excruciating. I spent a perfectly miserable night in the Vermont state park leanto where we were camped, and the next day zipped down to Hanover, NH to the hospital emergency room.

At Hanover, I was treated by a physician’s assistant, who was familiar with the type of injury I had suffered. He sure knew exactly where to poke and make me jump and yelp! Tendonitis, he said. He fixed me up with an ice pack, prescribed some high powered Motrin, told me to rest and elevate my leg until the pain subsided, and sent Mrs. G and me on our way.

That was on Sunday.

Monday, we headed over to New York for a scheduled stay in the Adirondack High Peaks. I got to ride in the back seat of the van, leg iced, elevated and straightened out, like a prince. By Tuesday the leg was feeling a bit better, and I could walk in reasonable comfort, but with great care. Wednesday was much better: according to my journal, “a lot of the flexibility and range of motion without pain has returned, and I can walk more normally. Even tried walking up and down stairs like a usual person would, and got away with it.”

Thursday, I went on a short hike from Elk Lake to Slide Brook leanto and back, with no problems. Friday I did some more hiking – longer distance, but no real climbing.

Have had no knee “episodes” since. Thank goodness. My only “therapy” has been regular walking and hiking. I would not wish the pain I experienced in those two tendonitis episodes on anybody.

G.

Paradox
06-23-2006, 08:18 AM
I am wondering if the use of poles would reduce the incidence of knee problems. I don't like to have them in my hands, but I have made the observation that my knees feel much better after a long hike when I have used the poles.

Grumpy
06-23-2006, 08:41 AM
I am wondering if the use of poles would reduce the incidence of knee problems. I don't like to have them in my hands, but I have made the observation that my knees feel much better after a long hike when I have use the poles.

I have used a trekking pole or poles for many years, and they really do help take some stress off the knees, especially, it seems, while descending. These days I a Leki "Wanderfreund," which has a grip that makes it look (appropriately in my case) like an old geezer's cane. I find it easier on my wrist and hand. The stick also helps a great deal with balance and stability issues -- helping to offset the unfortunate effects of bifocal eyeglasses.

G.

kmorgan
06-23-2006, 09:02 AM
Today I woke up with severe pain in the front of my knee, and promptly drove to Boston to see my doctor. He diagnosed it as patellar tendinitis (http://www.mgh.harvard.edu/ORTHO/PatellaTendinitis.htm), and told me that there is no real treatment; just rest, ice and analgesics until nature takes its course.

His estimate is that it will be about four weeks before I am able to hike again :( At my age four weeks of inactivity translates into a huge loss of fitness, but I know enough to realize that using an unhealed knee will almost certainly prolong the period of disability. Very frustrating, to say the least.

Does anyone here have any experience with this condition?

I've been hiking with this for over a month now. I initially injured it while on a downhill section when I jammed my knee joint (locked it while stepping down hard). Since then it's been getting worse. Going downhill with poles helps.

It's definitely worse if I sleep with my knees bent. Lately I wake up in the middle of the night with the front of my knee burning. Straightening my leg makes the pain go away.

Guess I have to take some advice and rest it... :(

giggy
06-23-2006, 09:26 AM
due to running/hiking/climbing - I have bouts of achilles tendonitis - I have had this on and off for about 18 months now - I seem to finally got it under control over the last few months with ice - 15 to 20 minutes on nights I run. so ice ice and more ice I would say.

It felt pretty good after a 23 miles hike this past weekend - so I hope its getting better. Due to my family life - i typically have to take at least 2 weekends off in between hikes, so this helps too.

jfb
06-23-2006, 10:17 AM
Does anyone here have any experience with this condition?

I occasionally get similar pain. Rather than describe the whole story, I'll skip to the ending. I feel like my pain is caused by occasional minor misalignment of all that "stuff" that goes in and around the kneecap. When I get the pain, I kneel on a soft surface (carpet works well) with my weight on that kneecap and gently rock back and forth several times through the full range of motion of the joint. The motion realigns all that "stuff." Works great for me.

blacknblue
06-23-2006, 12:28 PM
Yes, I have painful experience with it. There really is no way to speed the recovery; you just have to give it time. The hardest part is just keeping yourself under control and not re-aggravating it (which I did a number of times). I probably took me about 6-8 months to fully recover to the point where I could go for long hikes again without pain. Obviously, it was gradual - building up distance and stamina with shorter recovery rest periods in between.

I recommend getting on a bike or in a pool/lake to stay in reasonable shape while you recover. Just remember to listen closely to your body and stop at the first hint of returning pain.

DougPaul
06-23-2006, 01:06 PM
Just remember to listen closely to your body and stop at the first hint of returning pain.
In my experience with achilles tendonitis, the pain is often delayed by a day or so. Makes it very hard to keep one's activity within bounds just by listening for pain.

This is what made my assessment by palpation (described in my earlier post) so useful--it enabled me to evaluate the swelling before using the tendon rather than after using (and possibly overusing) it. My experience was also that the tendon would become asympotmatic well before it was fully healed--without the paplation test, the only way to evaluate it was to blindly try something and find out the next day if it was too much. You only have to reinjure occasionally to keep tendonitis going for a long time.

Doug

peakn
06-23-2006, 09:29 PM
You only have to reinjure occasionally to keep tendonitis going for a long time.
Doug
Mohamed,
Have been dealing with this exact situation for over a year. Sorry to hear about it.
Mine started as prolonged soreness after hikes (more than a few days). Is especially bad if I jam it on the way down. It got worse after Adams last Fall. My Bad- I haven't stopped hiking or skiing- just toned it down a little and rested longer between hikes. As others have said, it doesn't get better without rest.
I finally gave in and saw an orthopedic surgeon a few weeks ago. I was imagining all kinds of bad news. Diagnosis was PT. He didn't want to be aggresive with treatment. He recommended the usual rest, elevation, ice and compression, exercises, stretching, Ibu, and a knee support during hiking. Also to be proactive after hikes with icing, elevation and stretching.
For exercise he said to build up the quads and hamstrings for a few weeks first with leg presses and squats starting with light weight (and not to use the quad extension machines). Then to begin with short hikes and if it feels OK to do something like a Welch-Dickey. Then move on from there, being the judge of how far to push it based on how it feels.
I also use Glucosamine daily, and a protein/carb muscle recovery drink after hikes and workouts. Feeling pretty good right now and am back up to 10 miles with only mild discomfort after.
Wish you the best and a speedy recovery. I know what you mean about "at my age...." as I am up there with you. I can't stand sitting around. I start to tick off what percentage of my remaining good hiking months I'm wasting.

Harry

Mohamed Ellozy
06-24-2006, 07:44 AM
Many thanks to all for the good wishes and helpful info :) Alas, from your combined experience it appears it may well last longer than the four weeks I was thinking of :(

The good news is that ice and large doses of Ibupofen (physician prescribed!) are doing their magic. Pain is down to the level of merely annoying, and I get some exercise by walking a mile at a time several times a day. Not very aerobic, but it burns some calories and gets me out of the house!

DougPaul
06-24-2006, 11:20 AM
The good news is that ice and large doses of Ibupofen (physician prescribed!) are doing their magic. Pain is down to the level of merely annoying, and I get some exercise by walking a mile at a time several times a day. Not very aerobic, but it burns some calories and gets me out of the house!
In my experience, getting the pain to go away is easy in the short term. Just don't use the injured tendon and apply a bit of inflammation control. The hard part is getting back to full function without reinjury. Exercise builds the tendons and muscles, but too much can cause reinjury and the feedback (pain the next day) comes too late to avoid reinjury. This was a very difficult balance for me. (The palpation method of evaluation was a big help to me in threading my way through this minefield.)

Once you start hiking again, It may also help to scale back your hiking difficulty and/or allow a rest day or two between hikes for a while.

Good luck.

Doug

skibones
06-27-2006, 08:20 PM
I think that finding a physical therapist that is used to treating athletes and not just old patients is important for a quick recovery. My daughter had surgery on each knee for torn ACLs. The recovery the first time around was quick due to the fact that the PT was extremely aggressive and pushed her based on the fact that she was a recovering athlete. Second time around, she got patella tendonitis. The physical therapy the second time around was more conservative and more "cook book". First time around the physical therapist had her jogging after three weeks and doing drills and exercises that were related to her sports. Besides Advil and ice and rest getting someone with the right training to help with the treatment is important to get back hiking as soon as possible.

Stan
06-27-2006, 09:33 PM
Sorry to hear about that knee injury. I have a different injury and the only thing we're certain of is that it is not arthritis and I'm getting an MRI tomorrow. Friends are betting it's a torn miniscus; I'm praying its just a stubborn sprain.

Whatever, here's my take on the exercise. I refuse to let it incapacitate me but I don't push my luck, it'll delay the healing and could make it worse. I too hate to lose conditioning, it is easier to maintain fitness than to get it back. However, with hikers' knees, it is easier to damage them further than it is to heal them. It is a mistake to let the physical comfort that pain killers provide lull us into the false sense of security that we're not doing harm if we don't hurt.

bubba
06-27-2006, 10:31 PM
Mo, sorry to hear. I read the link to the injury and found it all too familiar!! So that's what keeps bothering me! Luckily any of my pain in not acute. My knees have "bothered" me on hiking 'downs' for a few years and I bought one Ace brace and it helps so much, I figured why only have one on... so now I'm double poled and double braced. It helps.

My current job sees me at a desk way too much, and it doesn't seem to do the knees any help!! That's been a surprise. All in all I think you (and me also) have found some good advise in the above posts. PT is probably a smart option. Daxs told me I should be on Glucosamine a while ago. I bought some, but you have to take it three times a day!! I can't maintain that schedule... or haven't chosen to step up to the challange.

So, hope it heals quickly. Generally, I think biking is a good form of non-impact training and it doesn't seem to aggravate my knees too badly (although I believe I am in some slight pain most of the time). A doctor recommended a pillow between my knees while sleeping for a minor back irritation -- I find it helpful with the knees, also.

Lastly, I can't imagine that Stan posted and didn't recommend Tequila!?!? For years he's been harping the positive tonic attributes of the drink. :confused:

Stan
06-29-2006, 05:49 PM
Lastly, I can't imagine that Stan posted and didn't recommend Tequila!?!? For years he's been harping the positive tonic attributes of the drink. :confused:
I didn't want to be redundundant.

My MRI last night was hilarious. I almost ruined the thing by shaking with laughter. Here I am comfortably bound in this amazing contraption and admiring the marvels of technology and then the thing comes on and the horrendous noises drown out the elevator music they plugged in my ears. I am having visions of the original version of Frankenstein and wondering who I would be when they let me out. The din was one thing but in the background there was this unceasing rhythmic background sort like a bad rap soundtrack. Halfway through this adventure the technician asks me if I'd like her to change the station, the one plugged into my ears ... somehow with a straight faced I manged to tell her I couldn't hear it anyway.

It felt so good when it was over that I forgot all about the knee pain.

I highly recommend an MRI for knee pain.

But I prefer tequila. :)

skibones
06-29-2006, 06:16 PM
Sorry to hear about that knee injury. I have a different injury and the only thing we're certain of is that it is not arthritis and I'm getting an MRI tomorrow. Friends are betting it's a torn miniscus; I'm praying its just a stubborn sprain.

Whatever, here's my take on the exercise. I refuse to let it incapacitate me but I don't push my luck, it'll delay the healing and could make it worse. I too hate to lose conditioning, it is easier to maintain fitness than to get it back. However, with hikers' knees, it is easier to damage them further than it is to heal them. It is a mistake to let the physical comfort that pain killers provide lull us into the false sense of security that we're not doing harm if we don't hurt.
I have torn miniscus in both knees. If I keep my legs in shape the floating miniscus stays where it doesn't hurt. If I don't, the pain gets so severe that I have literally fallen to the ground before I knew what happened. So it's important for me to keep up any activity that uses my legs-hiking biking skiiing. That's more fun than going in for an operation. Hopefully your MRI will tell your Dr what's going on.

audrey
06-29-2006, 08:46 PM
[QUOTE=bubba]Daxs told me I should be on Glucosamine a while ago. I bought some, but you have to take it three times a day!! I can't maintain that schedule... or haven't chosen to step up to the challange.

Bubba, you don't have to take it 3 times a day - I used to pop 1 double strength in the morning and 2 at night. It worked within 3 weeks. It took Pat about 6 weeks to feel it. After about 6 months, I decreased the dose to 1 pill for maintenance but it wasn't enough. I thought the the stuff had lost its effectiveness, but now I'm happy on 2 a day. Even my doctor told me not to stop, and she's not really into alternative medicine. Anyway, I buy Walgreen's brand, super size bottles that are almost always BOGO. It's probably the easiest safest thing you could try.

bubba
06-29-2006, 09:33 PM
Audrey, there you go again... giving good advise. :) Thanks, I'll get with the progam.

Mo, what's the update?? Things better??

Mohamed Ellozy
06-30-2006, 08:07 AM
Mo, what's the update?? Things better??Bubba,

Thanks for asking! The condition improved as suudenly as it started. On Thursday (6/22) I was in severe pain which improved a bit with the Ibupofen. By Saturday (6/24) I was able to walk (slowly) a mile at a time, still taking large doses of Ibupofen. By Monday I was walking normal distances (4-8 miles on Rt 175) at normal speed, and stopped the Ibupofen.

I do not want to push things, but may start going up Tripoli Road today or tomorrow. The reason is that I have never learned to walk fast on the flat, so I cannot get a decent workout (fastest I seem to do is a mile in 17, sometimes 16, minutes). Tripoli Road will give me a decent cardiovascular workout, and I hope that it will be gentle on my knees.


I refuse to let it incapacitate me but I don't push my luck, it'll delay the healing and could make it worse. I too hate to lose conditioning, it is easier to maintain fitness than to get it back. However, with hikers' knees, it is easier to damage them further than it is to heal them. It is a mistake to let the physical comfort that pain killers provide lull us into the false sense of security that we're not doing harm if we don't hurt.Stan,

That exactly echos my feelings, and my dilemma. Younger folks simply cannot understand how fast fitness is lost as the years accumulate, and how hard it is to get it back. But premature resumption of activity may lead to an even longer period of forced rest, and even more fitness loss.

LivesToHike
06-30-2006, 01:09 PM
Bubba,
Stan,

That exactly echos my feelings, and my dilemma. Younger folks simply cannot understand how fast fitness is lost as the years accumulate, and how hard it is to get it back. But premature resumption of activity may lead to an even longer period of forced rest, and even more fitness loss.

Mohamed & Stan:
I fully agree. I'm in my late 40's. I partially ripped a gastrocnemius muscle in my left leg hiking down a local mountain about 4 years ago in June that year. I didn't require surgery, but I was still out of commission for the whole summer, but my fitness took me months after that to recover. It's far easier and faster to recover fitness when one is 23 than 43 or 53...

Mohamed: Good luck with your injury recovery. Glad to hear that matters are improving.


--LTH

DougPaul
06-30-2006, 03:39 PM
Mohamed & Stan:
I fully agree. I'm in my late 40's. I partially ripped a gastrocnemius muscle in my left leg hiking down a local mountain about 4 years ago in June that year. I didn't require surgery, but I was still out of commission for the whole summer, but my fitness took me months after that to recover. It's far easier and faster to recover fitness when one is 23 than 43 or 53...
True, but fitness can be recovered--its just a matter of time and some work. If I have to let myself get out of shape to recover from an injury, then I will. Been there, done that.

Doug
mid-50s.

Mohamed Ellozy
07-03-2006, 04:30 PM
On Friday morning I wrote:
By Saturday (6/24) I was able to walk (slowly) a mile at a time, still taking large doses of Ibupofen. By Monday I was walking normal distances (4-8 miles on Rt 175) at normal speed, and stopped the Ibupofen.

I do not want to push things, but may start going up Tripoli Road today or tomorrow. ... Tripoli Road will give me a decent cardiovascular workout, and I hope that it will be gentle on my knees.Shortly after posting I walked up to Russel Pond (four miles each way with about 1,000 feet of elevation gain), and on Saturday I went all the way to the Osceola trailhead (6.2 miles each way with about 1,200 feet of elevation gain). I had no pain in the knee, but decided to take Sunday off. Today I went up the Osseo Trail to the Flume (5.6 miles each way and 3,150 feet of elevation gain). No pain, did it in a respectable (for me :() time: 2:55, so my two weeks of no hiking did not cause me too much loss of fitness.

No pain, but I am taking tomorrow off. If everything is OK on Wednesday I will hike again, and if there is again no pain after the hike I will officially declare the episode closed (I hope that my knee agrees!).

kmorgan
08-31-2006, 08:45 PM
Well, it's been a long summer of no hiking. When I first encountered this thread back in June I had been hiking with my injured knee for over 10 weeks. After reading the thread I diagnosed myself with patellar tendonitis and stopped hiking to let it recover. After a month and a half it was still sore going down stairs so I went to see an orthopedic surgeon. The X-rays looked good, but the MRI showed a tear of the patella tendon.

I've been in physical therapy now for 3 weeks and it's starting to get better. Still no hiking :-( but I can at least see the light at the end of the tunnel. I just wish I had gone to the doctor right from the start. My recovery would have been much quicker.

So don't ignore those injuries!

Kevin

sierra
09-03-2006, 04:19 PM
after 24 yrs on peaks yr rd Ill give you my advice. I had it in both knees real bad. You can listen to all these people if you want but they are normal and do whatever thier normal doctors tell them. I tried that and was worse off, heres my advice. do not get sucked into phiscal therapy, that will make it worse and ring up the doctors bills to no end its a joke. Resting it for more then 2 weeks is also a joke. follow these steps.
1. neoprene knee braces on all hikes from now on.
2. Always use poles.
3. for one month take 3 to 4 advil every 4 hrs everyday.
4. try to get a doctor to inject cotizone into your knee asap.
5. rest it for 2 weeks max, then hike as much as you can whenever you can, treat your body like it must heal and it will, teach it to be soft and it will be,.
This is not cenventional I know but believe me IM back to running descents and I have never had a a problem since.
If your set on working with a doctor you need a sports doctor, not your everyday doctor, who will always give you the same advice, rst and keep on PT so he will keep you on the spit and your money coming in.

Sugarloafer
09-03-2006, 09:58 PM
I don't know if I'm breaking any interent forum etiquette, but here's a link to a ski forum discussion on this topic :

http://www.telemarktalk.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=23906&highlight=patellar+tendonitis

Mohamed Ellozy
09-04-2006, 09:47 AM
Much of the discussion here has dealt with the need for real rest, and the reluctance of many of us to do it. Just read an article in the Washington Post on recovering from a torn hamstring: Hamstrung -- or a Humbling Lesson in Healing (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/28/AR2006082800815.html).

While I'm at it, let me add a plug for the Moving Crew (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/linkset/2005/03/25/LI2005032500785.html) section of that paper. While much of the material is pretty obvious, there are still many interesting insights.