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View Full Version : Do you Eat Funny/Different Food on the Trail Only? Like SPAM!



skiguy
06-23-2006, 02:13 PM
I guess we all know just how good food taste before,during and especially after hiking. For me the box or package the food comes in could even taste good after hiking. But I was wondering does anyone have any kind of food they rationalize they can eat only when they go hiking or any special recipe that is strictly Camping/Trail food. What edibles are taboo for every day living and Outdoor Munchies for you only. I've got some great SPAM recipes but only rationalize (and taste good) after a few Peaks under my belt for the day.

Lizzy
06-23-2006, 02:47 PM
those nasty-ish beef jerky sticks with the even nastier processed cheese sticks.......never would touch them just sitting around the house, but I eat them all the time when I am hiking. I guess i do it for the sodium and the longer lasting energy that fat provides over simple sugars. And Combos....man i do love me some Combos when I am hiking.

giggy
06-23-2006, 03:05 PM
ohhh yea

at one time or another
1)bologna
2)imitation crab meat
3)beef jerky
4)chunks of odd german susauge
5)canned osyters

KMartman
06-23-2006, 03:08 PM
ohhh yea

at one time or another
1)bologna
2)imitation crab meat
3)beef jerky
4)chunks of odd german susauge
5)canned osyters


You dont eat #'s 1 and 3 any other time than on the trail?

M

Tom Rankin
06-23-2006, 03:09 PM
I guess we all know just how good food taste before,during and especially after hiking. For me the box or package the food comes in could even taste good after hiking. But I was wondering does anyone have any kind of food they rationalize they can eat only when they go hiking or any special recipe that is strictly Camping/Trail food. What edibles are taboo for every day living and Outdoor Munchies for you only. I've got some great SPAM recipes but only rationalize (and taste good) after a few Peaks under my belt for the day.The only time I eat power bars, pepperoni, Gatordade or ready-to-eat salmon in little bags is on the trail. My diet is almost completely different on the trail...

sapblatt
06-23-2006, 03:14 PM
I try to avoid junky sugars almost all of the time (alright - I do eat ice cream occasionally, but only for the calcium :D ), but on the trail I will eat chocolate in winter, peanut M & M's all year and drink Gatorade. I do not do these things otherwise.

Also have only had Wasabi peas on the trail...never anywhere else.

Roxi
06-23-2006, 03:17 PM
Peanut butter and Fluff sandwiches on Matthew's 9 grain and nut bread. They pack well, taste great, and give me the energy I want, yet I only crave them when hiking. Yum! :)

pilgrim
06-23-2006, 03:34 PM
Big fat summer sausages and dry salami. Can't even look at them anywhere else but on the trail.

kmac
06-23-2006, 04:07 PM
whoopi pies :D

jade
06-23-2006, 04:26 PM
Hey, I ate a whoopie pie on the presi traverse!....I eat so much GORP (the good kind with almonds, dark chocalate, craisins, and the rest..) on the trail, I shy away from it at home....I eat healthy on and off the trail but with a higher concentration of fats, potassium, salt and protien....and bugs...

My old boyfriend and I still chuckle about the time--in 1972--he ate a whole can of SPAM in one sitting while out on the trail...let's just say it came back up shortly afterwards in the very same dimensions...Specially Processed American Meat, is that really what SPAM means??

I could go for one of those jelly donuts right about now skiguy!

...jade

cbcbd
06-23-2006, 04:42 PM
Ah yes, SPAM... the stuff is great for getting something nice and heavy in your stomach.

An all time favorite is also Vienna Sausages... YUM!!

skibones
06-23-2006, 04:53 PM
I like to bring pb sandwiches, which i never eat at home. I didn't think they still sold SPAM - I haven't eaten that in years and I don't remember it being something I'd eat again--on or off trails. I also like to bring some kind of trail mix and a power bar that I nibble on the way up for energy-rarely eat these at home. I don't bring Cytomax anymore because the sugar was not satisisffying my thirst, but I may try that again just to get in the electrolytes.

cp2000
06-23-2006, 04:54 PM
raisins(good source of iron but high on the GI) M&M's and hard candies

Chip
06-23-2006, 05:19 PM
I like to bring pb sandwiches, which i never eat at home. I didn't think they still sold SPAM - I haven't eaten that in years and I don't remember it being something I'd eat again--on or off trails. I also like to bring some kind of trail mix and a power bar that I nibble on the way up for energy-rarely eat these at home. I don't bring Cytomax anymore because the sugar was not satisisffying my thirst, but I may try that again just to get in the electrolytes.
you can make a very respectable trail jambalaya with cut up spam and various pouched seafoods.

To the question:
Tins of sardines, MRE's, Tang, SPAM !, gorp & gin :o

the starchild
06-23-2006, 05:41 PM
tuna fish in other stuff besides a grinder roll with BBQ sauce (which is normal to me)

tuna with mac'n'cheese!

tuna with ramin!

tuna with pasta!

tuna on a bagel with pepperoni and monterry pepper jack cheese.

the salmon in a bag in mac'n'cheese is amazing too, but never made it at home.

Paradox
06-23-2006, 05:53 PM
Nothing I hate more than Powerbars, but I do eat them on the trail.

sleeping bear
06-23-2006, 07:30 PM
I tried pasta with clams that came from a foil bag (chicken of the sea I think). Never again. Nasty! Even after being in the woods for a few days, so ya know they're bad.

I've got a small, but decent, collection of things I make while camping (I'm not a big fan of the bagged "add water" stuff). I never make any of it at home, ever.

Head
06-23-2006, 10:16 PM
An all time favorite is also Vienna Sausages... YUM!!
Those things are absolutely disgusting!! (Cept on the trail where for some odd reason they are a delicacy! :))oh....and don't forget Energy gels!

trailbiscuit
06-23-2006, 10:38 PM
Sweet Sue foil pack chicken...Sue is indeed a sweet lass, but only on the trail.

As far as things I ate while on the AT...I'd rather not get into it. Not pretty at all.

Pete_Hickey
06-23-2006, 10:40 PM
I've been told that I was eating catfood on the summit of.....<forget name>... a few weeks ago.

One thing I like to do, is to go to the local Chinese supermarket, and buy things that look like they might be good to take on a hike. I usually don'T know what I'm getting, because most of them don't have any english, or if they do, the english is so bad, that it is impossible to tell what it is.

Sometimes it is OK, sometimes it is good, and sometimes it is downright bad. The most 'interesting' was this STUFF that I tried with several others to help me. We could not come to a concensus as to whether it was fish or a fruit.

Of course, one of my favorites is my chicken flavored peanuts. According to the ingreedients, it is made with powdered chicken and peanuts.

Another good one is the 'black food'. Not only does it provide nourishment while hiking, but it cures baldness, improves memory and sexual performence. What more could one want????!!!!! And to think that I've hiked with people who were afraid to try some, just because it was called, "black food".

peakbagger
06-24-2006, 07:06 AM
Oatmeal, fruit by the foot and peanut butter and nutella on burrito shells. None of them appeal to me execpt when I am backpacking.

skiguy
06-24-2006, 01:08 PM
Ah yes, SPAM... the stuff is great for getting something nice and heavy in your stomach.

An all time favorite is also Vienna Sausages... YUM!!

I always get a good laugh at the grocery store when I see Spam Lite and Vienna Sausage Lite on the shelf.....YEA RIGHT! :rolleyes:

TDawg
06-24-2006, 02:34 PM
Sardines and Beef Jerky...wont touch either unless Im starving.

marty
06-24-2006, 02:45 PM
Dr. Steiner Bagel Energy Bars rock as a trail food. They can be found at Costco, but I haven't seen them anywhere else. They are much tastier than your standard energy bar. Buy a big bag and freeze some. Highly recommended.

Maddy
06-24-2006, 06:27 PM
Where do you get "chicken flavored peanuts"?

Gris
06-24-2006, 07:24 PM
Wild blueberries... I crave citrus but usually forget to take any. Dried fruit is good too. Chocolate icing in a can goes good with Guinness after you make camp. :D

skiguy
06-24-2006, 07:28 PM
Where do you get "chicken flavored peanuts"?

I was wondering about that too :D So far it looks like we have been talking about "Eat on the Go" food. What about that special meal that has to be heated.I find myself on multiday trips looking forward to that "HOT Thing" that will keep me going. Wether it be at the end of the day or a pick me up to get me out of my bag in the AM. Preperation is always a consideration..Stove,cookware, cleaning the pan, and of course carrying along whatever food it might be in the first place. Have you ever gotten in to that ambiance of perpetual eating while being out there, knowing what creation might be next based upon what you've got left in your pack, and been proud of your resourcefullness of your creation? I guess I am driving towards "COOKED FOODS" and any recipees you all might want to share.

gaiagirl
06-24-2006, 07:38 PM
I can hardly muster the energy for cooking off the trail, nevermind on the trail when I'm hiking/backpacking :D !! The bagged backpacking meals that are so alluringly packaged at EMS are a joke, too .... Not a lot of calories or food given how much is needed over the course of a long day on the trail and way too much $$$. I go the easy route every time .... Bars, nuts, hummus and whole grain crackers, etc. I occassionally eat the sugary stuff (candy, fluff, etc.) while hiking and I rarely touch any of that stuff at all otherwise.

Gris
06-24-2006, 07:42 PM
Well why didnt you say so? That's a horse of a different color! Boil 2 cups water, add 1/2 cup quick (not instant, you damn yankees!) grits and 1 teaspoon salt, bring back to boil for 3 minutes, cover and simmer 10 minutes stirring often. 1 minute before done stir in 1 packet Old El Paso Taco Seasoning. If you got some cheese (cheddar best) to put on top all the better. Goes great with anything that corn goes with, meat, veggies, etc. There you have it: "Gris' Mexicali Grits." Guaranteed to stick to yer ribs and warm yer gut. :D

skiguy
06-24-2006, 08:23 PM
Well why didnt you say so? That's a horse of a different color! Boil 2 cups water, add 1/2 cup quick (not instant, you damn yankees!) grits and 1 teaspoon salt, bring back to boil for 3 minutes, cover and simmer 10 minutes stirring often. 1 minute before done stir in 1 packet Old El Paso Taco Seasoning. If you got some cheese (cheddar best) to put on top all the better. Goes great with anything that corn goes with, meat, veggies, etc. There you have it: "Gris' Mexicali Grits." Guaranteed to stick to yer ribs and warm yer gut. :D

NOW THAT'S WHAT WE"RE TALKING ABOUT! RecipeeeeeesANYONE?

jade
06-25-2006, 09:08 AM
I remember reading somewhere about the 'self heating' bags o' coffee. You rip off the top of the packet and some chemical reaction causes heat (DougPaul, have you an explanation?)....wonder why these are not available as trail food?

Cous-cous can be softened to an edible degree by adding cold water...good source of carbs--just add olive oil, tamari (soy) and dried tomatos for a good source of carbs, sodium and potassium....yummm!

...Jade

DougPaul
06-25-2006, 10:21 AM
I remember reading somewhere about the 'self heating' bags o' coffee. You rip off the top of the packet and some chemical reaction causes heat (DougPaul, have you an explanation?)
I presume it is an exothermic (heat producing) chemical reation between something in the packet and oxygen or moisture in the air. Just a guess--I'm not a chemist.

Doug

giggy
06-25-2006, 11:26 AM
I remember reading somewhere about the 'self heating' bags o' coffee. You rip off the top of the packet and some chemical reaction causes heat (DougPaul, have you an explanation?)....wonder why these are not available as trail food?

Cous-cous can be softened to an edible degree by adding cold water...good source of carbs--just add olive oil, tamari (soy) and dried tomatos for a good source of carbs, sodium and potassium....yummm!

...Jade


I think what your talking about is the army MRE's, I was in during the early 90's and recall then starting around then to be included in the mre's. I thought then and still do - they are a waste of space :eek: better off with a small stove and boiling water

jmegillon149
06-25-2006, 01:00 PM
Foods I only eat on the trail:

1. Chicken jerky
2. Chocolate covered pretzels
3. Peanut butter and jelly bagel sandwiches
4. dried fruit
5. banana chips
6. Dehydrated backpacking meals (could you imagine having one of these sitting around the house)

And what is with the power bar bashing - I LOVE those things!!

Reading others' posts brings me to a weird realization. Why do people who engage healthy activities like hiking, tend to eat so unhealthy, especially on the trail? Lets face it spam, pepperoni, beef (jerky or otherwise) chocolate bars and stuff like that are not exactly good for you.

I guess one could make the argument that exercise makes it ok to not eat as good.

skiguy
06-25-2006, 02:53 PM
And what is with the power bar bashing - I LOVE those things!!

Reading others' posts brings me to a weird realization. Why do people who engage healthy activities like hiking, tend to eat so unhealthy, especially on the trail? Lets face it spam, pepperoni, beef (jerky or otherwise) chocolate bars and stuff like that are not exactly good for you.

I guess one could make the argument that exercise makes it ok to not eat as good.

First I have to agree with the Power Bar Bashers. Those things taste like sugar coated cardboard (even during and/or hiking), not to metion you could rip a filling out chewing on one. Sorry jmegillon149 but there are Soooooooooo many other energy bars out there that I like way better.
Secoundly I think we eat alot of the above mentioned foods because we do rationalize but more so because they taste good. More so though I think alot of it comes down to convience and ease of preperation. If you put your mind to it you can eat healthy on the trail and have it taste good too. Longer trips nutrition becomes more of an issue as we all know that eating lousey has its drawbacks.Here (http://www.powells.com/cgi-bin/biblio?inkey=65-0762706708-2) is a link to a great book for those Trail Chef's out there.

sleeping bear
06-25-2006, 04:16 PM
6. Dehydrated backpacking meals (could you imagine having one of these sitting around the house)

I know I said I don't usually eat that stuff, but I have had the Mountain House Lasagna, and it was good enough, I could consider eating it at home. :D

As far as eating healthy- eating healthy usually requires eating fresh stuff, not pre-packaged, which is far more convenient (and safe? think meat), at least for trips longer than one day.
Just try to carry green peppers with you for more than a day or two in a pack, go ahead, I dare you... :cool: :D Trying to get rotten pepper stink out of your gear while in the woods is no fun! :eek:

Pete_Hickey
06-25-2006, 10:27 PM
Talk about waste in packaging...

http://www.chem.soton.ac.uk/index.htm?http://www.chem.soton.ac.uk/news/stories/coffee.htm

No, they are NOT MRE's.

Pete_Hickey
06-26-2006, 11:20 AM
Where do you get "chicken flavored peanuts"?

I was wondering about that too :D I find them at a local Chinese supermarket, a great place to find all kinds of things that are great for hiking. Ever chew on squid jerkey?

For those who may not beleive that chicken flavored peanuts exist:

http://newmud.comm.uottawa.ca/~pete/tmp/peanuts.jpg

BTW, the thing next to it is not hiking food. It is a prop. I frequently speak at networking conferences. At the beginning of my talk, I put that can up on the podium. For some reason, it gets a laugh.

skiguy
06-26-2006, 11:33 AM
BTW, the thing next to it is not hiking food. It is a prop. I frequently speak at networking conferences. At the beginning of my talk, I put that can up on the podium. For some reason, it gets a laugh.

I beg to differ and I bet I can change your mind and/or your stomach. You must try my recipee called "Spam de la ronge". First take spam and slice into medium size pieces.Lightly sizzel then add one cup of premixed Tang juice and simmer till Tang Juice is cooked off. :p :rolleyes:

4000'er
06-26-2006, 11:42 AM
Specially Processed American Meat, is that really what SPAM means??
...jade
What does SPAM stand for?
One of the world's most asked and most incorrectly answered questions. The truth is, SPAM doesn't really stand for anything. When SPAM first came out, it was marketed as Hormel Spiced Ham (see The SPAM Story (http://www.cusd.claremont.edu/~mrosenbl/spamstory.html)), and it soon had many competitors. In order to get the lion's share of the market, Hormel decided their Spiced Ham needed a catchier name. A prize of $100 was offered for a new, memorable name. The prize was won by Kenneth Daig neau, brother of a Hormel executive, when at a New Year's Eve party he suggested the name "SPAM". The rest is history. If the truth isn't what you hoped for, why not check out some of the theories (http://www.cusd.claremont.edu/~mrosenbl/spamtheory.html) people have come up with over the years?

jmegillon149
06-26-2006, 12:30 PM
I know I said I don't usually eat that stuff, but I have had the Mountain House Lasagna, and it was good enough, I could consider eating it at home. :D

As far as eating healthy- eating healthy usually requires eating fresh stuff, not pre-packaged, which is far more convenient (and safe? think meat), at least for trips longer than one day.
Just try to carry green peppers with you for more than a day or two in a pack, go ahead, I dare you... :cool: :D Trying to get rotten pepper stink out of your gear while in the woods is no fun! :eek:


I guess when I say "healthy" I don't really equate that with "fresh", I tend to think of healthy as low fat, low salt, high protein, high in complex carbs; most of stuff I eat on the trail, such as dehydrated meals, dried fruits, chicken jerky, energy bars etc., fits all those except the low salt. I guess its the high frequency of people answering with things like pepperoni, vienna sausages and that kind of stuff that seems odd to be eating while doing something physical; of course I am a former wrestler, avid weightlifter, and former obese person(post college wrestling career->blew up, so glad I got into hiking!); so the idea of eating beef, pork, candy in any setting seems to go against my lifestyle, while hiking fits it extremely well.

With that said, these two things that seem to go together in my mind, yet are often not combined in the minds of others seems a little odd to me. But I guess we each do this kind of stuff for our own reasons, not to mention that we all have our own physical goals, ambitions, capabilities, metabolsims, etc; for example, my natural metabolism requires constant dieting, working out, etc., and any slippage in these habits would not permit me the physical ability to go hiking (at least not the pace, distance, and duration that I desire)

JohnL
06-26-2006, 02:08 PM
Egad! If I would not eat something at home, what makes me think I would entertain eating it on the trail where digestive stresses are greater? I donít take anything with me on a hike that does not come from my normal pantry. I once ate freeze dried foods for 36 consecutive days and this was long before they became something resembling palatable. It was not pretty. However, at the time there was no other choice but now I have choices. My motto is that if itís not table food, then itís not trail food.

JohnL

WhiteMTHike
06-26-2006, 02:28 PM
I used to have some MRE's left from my Army days, I saved some upon retiring. Those things aren't bad but only taste good on a trail. Now that I'm out of them I'll probably pick up some more at an Army/Navy surplus store since I'm not out of trails to hike.

pedxing
06-26-2006, 02:34 PM
I always eat a higher fat diet on the trail,
If I'm not sharing food with anyone else, I won't cook inthe summer. I'll eat dry salami (and other sausages) and cheeses that don't require refrigeration. I'll also take tons of nuts and dried fruit and some trail hardy bread. I tend to get obsessed with the calorie/weight ration of all the food I take if I'm going to be out for more than 2 -3 nights.

jfb
06-26-2006, 03:19 PM
Foods that I eat on the trail that I don't eat at home include instant oatmeal, instant coffee and "just add water" pancake mixes. Otherwise for a typical one or two night trip, I usually eat food that I would also eat at home (but not as much variety).

skiguy
06-26-2006, 04:10 PM
Egad! If I would not eat something at home, what makes me think I would entertain eating it on the trail where digestive stresses are greater? I donít take anything with me on a hike that does not come from my normal pantry. I once ate freeze dried foods for 36 consecutive days and this was long before they became something resembling palatable. It was not pretty. However, at the time there was no other choice but now I have choices. My motto is that if itís not table food, then itís not trail food.
JohnL
Agreed John...The Whole SPAM thing goes back to old Summer Camp Rituals. Kind of like what Pete Hickey was saying about using it at confrences for effect.This is really more of my mentality.


First I have to agree with the Power Bar Bashers. Those things taste like sugar coated cardboard (even during and/or hiking), not to metion you could rip a filling out chewing on one. Sorry jmegillon149 but there are Soooooooooo many other energy bars out there that I like way better.
Secoundly I think we eat alot of the above mentioned foods because we do rationalize but more so because they taste good. More so though I think alot of it comes down to convience and ease of preperation. If you put your mind to it you can eat healthy on the trail and have it taste good too. Longer trips nutrition becomes more of an issue as we all know that eating lousey has its drawbacks.HERE (http://www.powells.com/cgi-bin/biblio?inkey=65-0762706708-2) is a link to a great book for those Trail Chef's out there.
Lots of talk about how bad store bought dried food is.So has anyone dried their own food. I have used Food Dryers (http://www.harvestessentials.com/fooddeh.html) and Vac Packers (http://www.profmarket.com/VacuFresh.htm) before and had some great results.

KMartman
06-26-2006, 04:24 PM
I have the Exaclibur 2400 4 tray model..works great..the jerky comes out terrific provided you use a marniade that you enjoy..

M

trailbiscuit
06-27-2006, 11:14 AM
Ever chew on squid jerkey?

Squid jerky is pretty tasty.

As far as recipes go, just add taco seasoning to anything on the trail and it tastes good, such as Lipton Sides Spicy Alfredo, Lipton Sides Spicy Teriyaki, Lipton Sides Spicy Stroganoff, Lipton Sides Spicy Chicken. (But, never eat the Liption Sides Nacho Pasta...it's gross. Trust me, it's nacho pasta.)

Pete_Hickey
06-27-2006, 12:19 PM
Ever chew on squid jerkey?
Squid jerky is pretty tasty.Maybe, but there's something about the piece with the eyes. I have a thing about eating something that's looking at my as it travels to my mouth.

Mike P.
06-27-2006, 12:43 PM
Definitely different

On trail Bon-e-bel Cheese wheels, last longer, single serve Vs. bringing a block of cheese which I try not to eat since an 8 oz block equals one serving to me (it wasn't by accident I got to almost 230 last year)

Sliced peperoni, try to get Turkey as it's lower in fat & calories,

Cliff Bars (other bars too in summer)

I try & keep the same trail food, summer & winter so it's important that it'd edible at 80 or -20. That's not a concern at home, Pizza & pasta don't pack well.

trailbiscuit
06-27-2006, 02:55 PM
Maybe, but there's something about the piece with the eyes. I have a thing about eating something that's looking at my as it travels to my mouth.

Yah, skip that piece. As a rule, I always pass on food that ;) at me.

bubba
06-27-2006, 11:52 PM
Definitely Cliff Bars Ė only on the trail. Daxs packed some Vegan jerky that was very tasty on the top of Eisenhower, but Iíd have pass on closer to sea level. I donít mind Jerky on the trail but have no interest off trail. For me, the jury is still out with regard to GorpÖ not sure how it likes me on the trail and Iíd not eat it off trail. On a couple of recent trips hiking partners have had small packaged salami that seemed excellent later in the hike. I am also not a gum chewer, but I really like it while hiking. (I can actually get myself in trouble by chewing too long Ė jaws hurt!!)

PowerBars gag me no matter where. Add power gels to the trail only list. Iím only out for overnights (two at most) so not having heated food doesnít bother me. My mother actually served SPAM occasionally at home (baked with whole cloves in a brown sugar glaze) and I didnít mind it. In college I learned that it is made of pigs aóholes, so one would have to wonder how many calories are in holes?? However, Skiguyís recipe sounds excellent!!

As far as ďhealthyĒ I donít know if this is relative to the goal of obtaining energy. Hiking burns calories and the attempt is to replace them quickly on the trail and to build up for the next day. And, for the record, I could live on PB&J both on the trail and off!!

Pete_Hickey
06-28-2006, 07:18 AM
Now that I'm back from Philly, I loked into my stash and found some more stuff. I have this 'Black Cheese'. Some kind of powder, to which hot water is added, and it turns into cheese. At least that's what it says on the bag. It also has tis warning:

"Not stir oppositely, otherwise the cheese will not coagulated"

I take that as a serious warning. It also goes on to say,

"It has been proved for thousands years in China that black food is nutritious, and nowadays, the black food has become more and more popular in the world. With high quality black bean and sessame the sessame and black bean chese is finely produced"

I mean, when you read a label like that, you HAVE to get some to take on a hike. Why not make the 'eating' part just as adventurous as the rest of the hike. Why take a chalanging hike, but take plain boring food, that offers no challenge to keep down?

Go EXTREME all the way!

skiguy
06-28-2006, 08:40 AM
My mother actually served SPAM occasionally at home (baked with whole cloves in a brown sugar glaze) and I didnít mind it. In college I learned that it is made of pigs aóholes, so one would have to wonder how many calories are in holes?? However, Skiguyís recipe sounds excellent!!


If you liked the sound of the other recipe bubba here's another one to try; kind of a variation on your Mom's recipe. I call it "Spam al la Hawaiian", it goes like this. Once again slice SPAM to medium slices, and then sizzle lightly. On the side mix brown sugar and maple syrup together to create Glaze. Spoon over lightly sizzled SPAM and continue to cook over medium heat. Again on the side drain a small can of Pineapple chunks of their juice. Toss the Pineapple chunks into the pan along with a few tablespoons of their juice and cook until SPAM and PineApple are slighlty browned. :p :rolleyes: :eek: