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chuck
07-07-2006, 11:42 AM
http://outdoors.mainetoday.com/trailhead/006335.html (http://)

chuck
07-07-2006, 11:45 AM
No sure what I did wrong here with the link - but not working. sorry.

Sheomet
07-07-2006, 11:57 AM
here you go
http://outdoors.mainetoday.com/trailhead/006335.html

trailbiscuit
07-07-2006, 02:40 PM
I'm not sure what was funnier Mr. Kish's blog or Mr. Smith's original article. :rolleyes:

It is interesting the responses backpackers get from the "real world." They're always at opposite ends of the spectrum: "You are a homeless vagrant; go away." VS. "You rock. How can I help? What do you need? Have a great trip!"

Personally, I like being a homeless vagrant. :cool:

sleeping bear
07-07-2006, 07:24 PM
If an area needs income, catering to homeless vagrants (ie backpackers and other "eco-tourists") is much more appealing and sustainable than some sort of industy that will do unsightly things to the land and environment. Unfortunately, at first glance this does not appear to be a profitable venture. But... I know I always wind up spending way more money than I intend to on any sort of trip, especially recently, on gas! :eek:

Woody
07-08-2006, 10:33 PM
Like Sleeping Bear, I think that I spend way too much money being an "eco-tourist" I know that I have done my part to support the economies of the North Conway NH area and the rest of NH. I am sure that I'll more than my share later this summer on our trip to Maine as well.

Woody

pedxing
07-09-2006, 03:51 PM
Mr. Smith is the head of "Sportsman's Alliance of Maine" which proudly displays a quote characterizing the group as "“Perhaps the single most powerful special interest group in Maine.” They claim to represent hunters, anglers, and trappers - although it seems some of these people reject Smith's claim to speak for them. (Policy issues aside, I assume that some might feel excluded by the gender specification in the group's title).

Stan
07-10-2006, 09:58 AM
Mr. Smith is the head of "Sportsman's Alliance of Maine" ...(Policy issues aside, I assume that some might feel excluded by the gender specification in the group's title).

May be easy for me to say but no one should feel excluded by semantics... the first Registered Maine Guide was a woman, Cornelia "Flyrod" Crosby. It's another reinforcement of my experience that suggests that people whose opinions should be valued most are not blinded by semantics.

marty
07-10-2006, 10:23 AM
George Smith's rant on backpackers may be aimed at the Great North Woods National Park debate. George and the SAM folks are very much against public ownership of such areas, as it may impact hunting and fishing opportunities.

Paradox
07-10-2006, 02:47 PM
Another great thing about backpackers and other eco-tourism is we put next to no pressure on police and fire and very little on other emergency response groups. Compare eco-tourists to biker week or what a snowmobile sunk in a lake does to a water supply. A penny saved is a penny earned.

bubba
07-10-2006, 09:20 PM
Another great thing about backpackers and other eco-tourism is we put next to no pressure on police and fire and very little on other emergency response groups. Compare eco-tourists to biker week or what a snowmobile sunk in a lake does to a water supply. A penny saved is a penny earned.

Provided we find out way out of the woods!! :rolleyes:

Periwinkle
07-12-2006, 12:11 AM
Compare eco-tourists to biker week....

Just a different POV:

I own a small business in NH. And LOVE bikers. They spend huge amounts of money. Makes putting up with the noise worthwhile -- thought I have been known to run to the hills and stay there by the end of the week! They are very high on the tourist-income food chain.

Hikers, on the other hand, don't spend that kind of money. Most (including me) head out with supplies previously purchased from home base, simply to ensure that they have what they want/need. Most are camping, not stocking a rental with huge amounts of purchased food.

That having been said, I also LOVE hikers. They come in and eat humongous amounts of food! And I know most of 'em -- or chat them up.

I think the point of the article (other than those previously mentioned) was that hikers just don't spend as much as your average rental, eating out, shopping, attraction attracted tourist.

Just my .02

Paradox
07-13-2006, 07:19 PM
I too benefit from biker week. I have treated many visiting bikers with tooth problems over the past eight years, and never had a single problem with any one of them. My gestalt is my relationship with the many police officers I have as patients who universally say that biker week is the most stressful and violent time of the year for them. Two have had front teeth broken in fights during biker week over the past eight years. I benefit financially from this too, but I would be happier with no money and an uninjured patient. All of my patient cops are good people too and pay their bills. My patients that are EMT's generally don't like the week either. Biker week does not make cops into happy campers (I just had to throw that in).

A US forestry service ranger spoke to our Rotary club about a year ago. and he said (if my memory serves me right) that Snowmobiling brought roughly 1.2 B into NH the previous year. Hunting/fishing and alpine skiing each roughly half that. Biker week a quarter. He never did mention the hiker/camper figures. Last I heard nine bikers died this year during the week of biker week, add in the other biker accidents with just injuries that don't make it onto the front page and you get a pretty costly week.

TheChez
07-14-2006, 06:20 AM
Like Sleeping Bear, I think that I spend way too much money being an "eco-tourist" I know that I have done my part to support the economies of the North Conway NH area and the rest of NH. I am sure that I'll more than my share later this summer on our trip to Maine as well.

Woody

And the citizens of Maine thank you.

Compared to New Hampshire's White Mountains, Maine seems sparsely visited by hikers. More trails might bring more hikers, and with the trend moving away from backpacking and toward dayhiking, this could give some areas of the State a little economic shot in the arm.

From what I've observed, a lot of hikers these days are "big spenders". We just have to get them to spend more at L. L. Bean and at the local granola spas.