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WalksWithBlackflies
01-12-2004, 08:22 AM
Humans may be the smartest thing on the planet, but chimps are catching up really fast:

I went XC skiing this past weekend at a state park in central New York. I was coasting downhill at a pretty good speed, when all of a sudden, I was flying like superman. Crashed into the ground elbow and shoulder-first (still hurts). As I was shaking off the cobwebs, two gentlemen walked over to me. They said they saw me crash, and were sorry that they placed the softball-sized rock in the trail so they could find their way out :confused: By the time I got back on my skis, another skiier had come by to restrain me from committing about a dozen crimes.

This got me thinking... who were the stupidest people you've run across?

dug
01-12-2004, 09:12 AM
The guy who went flying by me on skis and hit the rock I put in the trail....



Just kidding!!!

JohnL
01-12-2004, 09:25 AM
A friend and I hiked up Cannon years ago and when we got to the Rim Trail, several people came down from the Tram and were talking to us. A guy asked "Did you hike up here?" and we said "Yes". A woman looked aghast and asked "All the way?"

On that same hike and just a few minutes later a young boy was throwing rocks down the hill and his father told him "Stop that. There might be hikers down there." To which the little boy made a snowball and asked "Is it okay to throw snowballs?" Dad answered "Yes."

JohnL

SherpaKroto
01-12-2004, 09:36 AM
Must be something about Cannon. When I climbed Cannon a few winters ago, a couple came up to me and asked if we had climbed. Ther next question was did I know there were lifts? (seriously)

Jaytrek57
01-12-2004, 10:18 AM
Stupid.

Tricky subject. If one doesn't know something...I would consider it ignorance. Still in most cases…no excuse.
In Yellowstone you are bombarded with literature to “Stay away from the animals”. Hand outs at the entrances, on the roads, etc.. Yet every time I am there, sure enough, there will be a person who wanders up to an elk or bison to get that “perfect” shot with the camera. It simply amazes me.

Anyone who bet against the Patriots this past week-end. That was ignorant and stupid.
:D
Stupidtrek57

max
01-12-2004, 11:12 AM
While building a cairn above treeline on the Red Spot trail on Mt. Monadnock, I had a woman approach me and ask if I was building a barbecue.

And once from the Monadnock summit I had a gentleman ask me if it were possible to see Everest from here. I replied "Not today, it's a bit too hazy."

Stan
01-12-2004, 01:37 PM
Jaytrek, if you bet against the Patriots this week you'd have won ... they didn't meet the spread ... but who cares?

max, that bar-b-que idea sounds like a good one. Heck, what's wrong with a little cookout here or there ... pack your own charcoal, of course, in and out. As for Everest, that's ridiculous ... but I have claimed to see the Eiffel Tower on a really clear day.

audrey
01-12-2004, 01:59 PM
I think I met Rico's stupid people once: I was flying downhill on a oneway trail at a XC area and as I rounded a bend there were 3 people standing by the side of the narrow trail waving their arms and yelling to slow down. I went up in the air and came down on my tailbone, breaking it. When the fog cleared from my brain, I said, "What was it?" They said, "We thought you were going too fast!" I said a couple of choice things and spent the next two hours hobbling back to the car.

mommabear
01-12-2004, 02:24 PM
A friend of mine was skiing a few years ago and another skier who was skiing too fast and recklessly ran right into her and knocked her down. She was in the hospital for days and spent months being cautious about everything she did while she had to let her pelvic bone heal.

Jaytrek57
01-12-2004, 03:59 PM
Stan--

The Patriots met the spread if you "teased" it down. Won't get into it here but...let's just say with the "under" I had a pretty prosperous night.

Back on Topic:

Stupid Part II:
All those "rocket scientists" out there who take a #2 in the winter time, on snow, WITH toilet paper and don't at the very least, pack out the toilet paper. They will just dig a hole in the snow and forget about it. Do they think the TP magically disappears with the melting snow?

It is a shame to go into established sites May/June and see the evils of their ways strewn about.

Bettheundertrek57

ADK3356
01-12-2004, 04:02 PM
I was stopped by three exhausted people on the Lake Arnold trail (they had climbed Marcy up Van Hoevenberg trail and were returning.) They asked if I could tell them where they were, and I said sure, let me show you on your map, and they pulled out the state highway map.

miehoff
01-12-2004, 04:27 PM
I got one for ya'll!

The other day I was...wait...uhhh...that was me that was stupid. Forget it.

Raymond
01-13-2004, 01:16 AM
Navigating by road map rings a bell with me, too... I think someone was trying to get up or down Algonquin, maybe, or through Avalanche Pass.

It seems to me that Edward Abbey had a lot of stupid/ignorant/funny questions that he was asked by tourists when he worked as a ranger. When I was on Hurricane Ridge in Washington State back in ’84, I overheard a guy ask a ranger why was there snow on these mountains (the Olympics) when they were only such-and-such an elevation and you had to go to such-and-such higher an elevation to see snow in Colorado. The ranger just looked at him for a few seconds then replied, "Well, we're a lot further north here."

Survival Boy
01-13-2004, 03:12 AM
I spent a night at the Beaver Brook shelter on Moosilauke a few years ago and ran into a couple from the Bronx who were section hiking the AT. I was eating dinner with friends when a man came walking up (followed by a dog and his wife) who sat down by our fire and took his boots off before pointing to them and announcing "I've been hiking in these." After this, he tried to dry his boots by putting them directly on a flaming log. The evening became more and more bizarre when the couple refused to let their dog drink stream water for fear of giardia.

At one point, the woman asked me if I knew anything about edible mushrooms and I mentioned that one of my friends knew quite a bit about them. At this she said "Oh, I don't mean the hallucinogenic kind." Not to be outdone, the man began asking about the possibility of a taxi picking him, his wife, and dog up at the USFS road below the Beaver Brook shelter area. He was surprised upon being told that there were no taxis in the area.

These were the highlights of a chance meeting with outdoor ignorance at its finest.

ADK3356
01-13-2004, 06:53 AM
I was staying at the Perch leanto overnight. We were sharing it with two strangers. One of them mentioned that his friend snored, but that he would take care of it. That night every time his friend snored, this guy took two pots and banged them loudly together!!
Not a very good nights sleep.

jfb
01-13-2004, 08:13 AM
Not directly related to camping, but a former roommate once used some of my Coleman fuel to start a wood fire. Problem was the wood was in a fireplace insert and when he threw the match in, it blew the insert halfway across the living room.

Mike Gilhooly
01-13-2004, 09:06 AM
When the fishing gets slow on the Sacandaga, the wife and I go over to the boat launch. We anchor off, get out our lunch and watch. Between the backing up of the rig and forgetting the drain plug, the yelling just tops it off. Great entertainment!

Mike G.

MD Cuse
01-13-2004, 09:54 AM
Alpine makes a very good point about stupid people and the entertainment value they provide.

A couple summers ago we were staying at John's Brook Lodge. Around 9:00 PM a woman enters the main room and starts asking around if they have any rooms (they didn't). Ten minutes later her 11 or 12 year old boy comes in. He had fallen into John's Brook and was soaking wet. Then another ten minutes her daughter enters. None of them had any packs, they were all wearing aqua socks, and they obviously had separated as they were hiking in from the Garden.

A half hour later the father arrives, with about 100 pounds of gear on his back. They all then left, presumably to setup camp somewhere. Never saw them again.

carole
01-13-2004, 10:21 AM
After successfully negotiating numerous iced over stream crossings on Sat. (I counted about 21) I come home and two days later slip on a crossing that I make often. Because it had fresh snow cover the rock I thought I was stepping to was actually a solid ice flow that sent me down in a flash. My wrist is none to happy. Good thing no one was watching or it would have been quite entertaining.

Paul_Bear
01-13-2004, 10:32 AM
About half way up Mt Rainier, we ran into a guy that was climbing solo. He asked if he could buy a pair of crampons from us. We declined the offer as we were using ours at the time. Thankfully, he then descended rather than following us up onto an even more crevassed glacier than the one he had already crossed.

Some years later, we must have met his relative on Mt. Washington. We were descending the summit cone in late spring with a few inches of snow on the ground, temps in the mid 30's and a heavy condensing fog making our shell gear pretty wet. We meet a guy dressed in a soaking wet cotton sweatshirt heading up, complaining about being cold, and who then offers to buy a pair of gloves from us. Again we passed, since we were using the gear at the time and were enjoying being warm. We had no luck convincing the fellow that he'd be warmer if he descended.

Who knew there was so much money to be made selling gear on the trail! :D

KZKlimber
01-13-2004, 08:39 PM
While heading out for a short afternoon hike at a nature preserve not far from our home we encountered a very muddy trail with lots of exposed roots. Not unusual conditions but we were quite surprised to find a woman in bedroom slippers pushing a baby carriage. She had the good sense to turn around before the trail got steep.

jbrown
01-14-2004, 08:18 AM
On the way back to Flowed Lands from doing Redfield, I and 2 friends ran into a girls basketball team with coaches from Quebec. They were lost, no map, improperly clothed, hardly any gear/food/water, getting on toward dusk, had hiked Marcy from the Loj that day, and were supposed to be heading back on Lake Arnold trail. They had passed the trail and were midway down to Lake Colden.

We led them the remainder of the way to Lake Colden, pointed them in the direction of Avalanche pass, made sure they had a few flashlights and bid them adieu. The coach's excuse for continuing on when he discovered back at Marcy Dam that he had left his map in the car? (In bad french accent) "I have done this twice!"

(This statement became a mantra for my friends and I. "I do not need to treat my water, I have drank this twice!" and such like...)

adkleaddog
01-15-2004, 09:23 AM
The "road map" jarred the cobwebs....

I remember a bunch of years ago, we were driving down the dirt road towards Wilcox Lake to do some fishing, bouncing around in the truck when we came to a halt to see about 15 "kids" and what appeared to be a group leader walking up the road...they had the look of despair and exhaustion on their collective faces.
No packs, improperly dressed, no food, and a couple were carrying old soda bottles filled with water they no doubt found and filled from streams...we knew something was wrong.


Seeing that they were "inner-city" kids we just had to stop and ask where they were heading. The "group leader" said they were heading towards Hadley Mtn to climb it. That was the day before! After spending the night somewhere in the woods, they thought they would try to get to Hadley.....

I asked to see the map, and yes they produced one...a road map!
:rolleyes:

I just had to ask where they thought they were, and which way they were heading....(they had no compass either). The leader then pointed to a spot on the map that was about 10 miles away, in the opposite direction.

I pointed out where in fact they were on the "map", by the look on the faces of the kids, a mutiny, or worse, was about to occur. I gave them an old topo that I had, and asked if they would like a ride out..to Stony Creek to get some help.

Fifteen people, and 12 miles later in the back of the truck, they looked like a pile of puppies sleeping on a cold day. We let them out in Stony Creek, asked if we could contact someone, Mr. Leader then declared that they indeed were going to walk back towards Hadley on the county roads and "resume" their climb.....

They were from the "City"we were told, troubled kids getting out for adventure and "getting in touch" with themselves, and nature.

I still wonder to this day, if they made it to Hadley, or if the leader ever made it back to the big city!!!!
:D

sardog1
01-15-2004, 09:49 AM
Originally posted by Raymond
When I was on Hurricane Ridge in Washington State back in ’84, I overheard a guy ask a ranger why was there snow on these mountains (the Olympics) when they were only such-and-such an elevation and you had to go to such-and-such higher an elevation to see snow in Colorado. The ranger just looked at him for a few seconds then replied, "Well, we're a lot further north here."

And a little farther north, on the Alaska State Ferry as we cruised past tidewater glaciers and snowfields in October. Tourist looks agog at the scene and asks a crew member, "Just how high above sea level are we?" After a judicious examination of the facts, the laconic answer:"About seven feet."

And back to WA: We were hauling out the remains of an unfortunate near Rainier. He had bushwhacked with tennis shoes and fallen at a place where falling was inexorably fatal. We didn't have a regular body bag, so he was tightly wrapped him in a plastic tarp that left just the soles of his feet protruding and then hauled out on a wheeled litter basket. I followed the litter team with several SAR dogs in tow. As we proceded down the trail, a tourist going the other way stopped me and asked, "Was he hurt badly?"

Finally, one from a Maine ecotourism operator that I heard interviewed on the radio. The camp specializes in moose watching excursions. Their favorite question from a guest? "Just how old does a deer have to get before it turns into a moose?"

Grumpy
01-15-2004, 10:04 AM
An extended self-congratulatory moment after reading through this thread a bit ago segued into reflection on how I got to be so perfectly brilliant.

In the end, it dawned on me that my state of perfection was achieved, mostly, through having done an uncountable number of stupid things and having asked an untold number of stupid questions, or having made whole lot of stupid observations because I just didn’t know any better at the time. So my brilliance is not the result of native genius and superior instinct, after all. Drat!

Anybody else ever come to such a moment of revelation?

G.

lumberzac
01-15-2004, 10:21 AM
Anybody else ever come to such a moment of revelation?

I have done many stupid things in the past. I’ll probable do many more in the future. But I have learned from all of my mistakes, and that is what is important.

sardog1
01-15-2004, 11:32 AM
Originally posted by Grumpy
An extended self-congratulatory moment after reading through this thread a bit ago segued into reflection on how I got to be so perfectly brilliant.

In the end, it dawned on me that my state of perfection was achieved, mostly, through having done an uncountable number of stupid things and having asked an untold number of stupid questions, or having made whole lot of stupid observations because I just didn’t know any better at the time. So my brilliance is not the result of native genius and superior instinct, after all. Drat!

Anybody else ever come to such a moment of revelation?

G.

"rev-e-la-tion n.: 1. a revealing, or disclosing, of something. 2. something disclosed; disclosure; esp., a striking disclosure, as of something not previously known or realized. E.g., sardog1's postings on another board, here (http://appalachia.outdoors.org/bbs/messageview.cfm?catid=4&threadid=2454&highlight_key=y), and here (http://appalachia.outdoors.org/bbs/messageview.cfm?catid=2&threadid=4519&highlight_key=y), and here. (http://appalachia.outdoors.org/bbs/messageview.cfm?catid=3&threadid=3475&highlight_key=y) Be sure to scroll down the thread as needed to find the revelations. Many self-deprecating examples from others may be found also on VFTT."

Jaytrek57
01-15-2004, 11:35 AM
My mistakes (continuing) have been "learning experiences" and never "stupid". Perhaps funny, frustrating, time consuming and on occasion...injury prone/bordering on death....but NEVER stupid. ;)

Mad Townie
01-15-2004, 05:26 PM
Jaytrek, that's like never being lost, just occasionally being "turned around."

I thought about posting on this thread earlier, until I realized that the stupidest mistakes I could write about were all mine!:eek:

So, Grumpy, I enjoyed and appreciated your post. Luckily my stupid moves only threatened my comfort, never my safety.

Nonlegit
01-15-2004, 06:34 PM
ive qualified just recently. I just got back from powder mountain utah, and when i was up there i was shredding some really steep moguls when i missed a turn. I glanced downhill and saw some crud (or "chowder", churned up powder for the uninformed) and decided that i would slow down down there (i was going fast because i just start blazing straight down through the moguls). Then i saw a green run cut into the side of the bowl, and a MASSIVE lip on the far end. I hit the paralell green run going breakneck speed, got aproxamatle 55 feet of air, and rolled 300 (yes that was from ski patrol) feet farther down the mountain. Fortunately i didnt break my back, as i landed rump first. I really didnt even get hurt, but i literally thought i was going to die.

Also, just about every hike ive ever done has qualified as stupid to everyone but a select few that hears about it ("MOUNTAINS!!! IN THE WINTER!!!...seek therapy...")

Some guy jumped out of the chair on a lift ride up over this awesome chute that was real hard to get to, and then fell through the chute. I was 2 chairs back, and then caught up with him at the bottom of the mountain. He broke his femur.

Mad Townie
01-16-2004, 12:14 AM
Nonlegit, that reminds me of the famous famous last words:

Dude, watch this! :D

That line, or its equivalent, probably results in more stupid moves than anything else.

BenW
01-16-2004, 08:38 AM
Speaking of stupid people met while building a cairn, trail work in general is a good place to watch stupid people.

While building bog bridges on the Cascade Brook Trail this summer with an AMC vol crew we were inundated with several groups of them (a.k.a. goofers).

We had extracted the rotted remnants of an ancient bog bridge from a mud pit about 20 feet long and about 2 feet deep on average. The five of us were covered solidly to the knees at least as well as beyond our elbows etc... One of these groups of goofers (this one about 40 middle school kids, sneaker clad etc. undoubtedly headed for Lonesone Lake) comes along. One of them asks us, "Is it deep?" "Not really." We're only covered beyond our knees. Farther down the line, one of them proceeds to walk along one of the stringers we have laid (precariously balanced - not for walking obviously) on the side of the trail, waiting until we need it. "Whoa---" flop. Then near the end of the line, one of them decides that this mud pit looks like solid ground...

Another day we met a group of khaki and polo shirt-clad high school boys huffing and puffing their way up the trail. We were all strung out along the trail carrying stringers (no pun intended) for the bridges. [man those are heavy and awkward] They asked me if I was carrying that board...

Goofers... :rolleyes:

Later we started setting "Goofer traps." :eek:


Ben

mink319
01-16-2004, 02:19 PM
Last year while XC skiing at Onteora Lake in the Catskills, there were some people ice fishing so I stopped to talk to them and the next day I decided to go ice fishing there.

When I first got there I was bringing my stuff out to the ice when I heard a car that sounded like it was stuck. The road to the lake was plowed, but the parking lot wasnt and had over 2 ft of snow. These people attempted to drive into the parking lot and park in 2 ft of snow, and to get out they ended shoveling almost half of the parking lot. Finally almost an hour later they got out, all that and they just left.
Later on while I was waiting for some fish to bite I was skiing around the lake when a family from the city on skis came up to me and asked me what I was doing. It was clear I was fishing because there was holes drilled in the ice with fishing poles and tip-ups over them, and one of them thought I was taking water test, so I just said oh yea, I do every weekend.
Later on after I left and was driving down the main road through town I saw them attempting to ski on the snowbanks on the side of the road because they didnt realize that this trail came out to a road and ended, and didnt think to turn back.
I get a kick out of stupid people as long as they dont get hurt or lost.

Head
01-17-2004, 05:15 PM
Stupid people I can handle, I consider them to be Live Entertainment. AlpineSummit

Now thats FUNNY!
_________________

BirdHead Studios (http://www.birdheadstudios.com)

jrb
01-17-2004, 11:21 PM
http://www.freep.com/news/mich/sunk17_20040117.htm

mushroomman
01-18-2004, 10:52 AM
I get a kick out the snowmobilers who spend 4 to 10 grand on a sled and take them out on the lakes to see how much open water they can cross. In Ma. when your sled or car goes in your responsible for getting it out, and the price can be huge plus fines. Gotta admit, it is fun to watch, but just seems really stupid to risk that much money!
Steveo

TomEske
01-18-2004, 12:47 PM
I just learned that the title of stupid people does not only apply to "civilians". This morning while hiking I saw the familiar sign that reads "NO CAMPING WITHIN 150 FEET OF THE TRAIL". Posted immediately above it (on the same tree) was another sign which read "PLEASE STAY ON THE TRAIL". Maybe it was just my humor at the moment, but I stopped and took a photo.
Tom

Trail Orphan
01-18-2004, 07:28 PM
While hiking up Treadway Mountain in NY a few summers ago, we came around a bend only to find a young woman naked from the waist down doing her "business" right in the middle of the trail!

newcomb family
01-18-2004, 09:55 PM
The first time I was hiking Gothics and Armstrong was October of '93. My friends and I were somewhat new to hiking and didn't have the gear for the hike. Regardless, we came asross some folks at the junction of the trails near the summit of both peaks to find them drinking booze from a bottle labled "wiskey", yes this is how it was spelled in black marker, on the side of their little red jug. They offered to share, but we gracefully declined.

MonadnockVol
01-19-2004, 12:56 AM
I am another hiker who attained his current dazzlingly high level of proficiency in the mountains by first making every mistake in the book. Fortunately I have survived (so far).

Here are three examples that come to mind:

1963 (8 years old): Mark and I take our first ever backpack along the AT in CT.

For food we bring canned veggies and a 5 lb. canned ham. We forgot to bring a can opener so the veggies were out. The ham had one of those little keys that you use to peel off a strip of metal all the way around the can, so that we could open. We ate about 2 pounds of the ham the first night and then realized we had no way to carry the rest. The ham was covered in a gelatinous goo and the edge of the can was razor sharp. A three day backpack turned into an overnighter.

1972 (17 years old): Our high school teacher, Mr. Riemer, took a bunch of us on a hike up Mt. Washington in November. There were several feet of snow on the trails and the legs of the cotton jeans we were wearing started to get wet. We made it to the alpine garden above the headway when a blizzard hit and we were in a whiteout. Mr. Riemer decided we should head for the autoroad and we started across the garden. A pair of college-aged hikers (who were properly equiped and knew what they were doing) were hiking about 30 yards below us and called up to us:

"Do you see any cairns up there?"

And my friend Chris called down, "Carrots? No, there aren't any carrots up here."

The two hikers looked at each other and called up, "Wait there!" They hiked up, looked us over and said, "You'd better come with us" and they took us down and out the Lion's Head Trail.

Chris went on to become an excellent rock climber and a member of an expedition to Annapurna (where they don't have any carrots either).

1975 (20 years old):

It's spring break and Jim, Deborah, & I are going on a backpack on the AT from Fontana Dam to Climgman's Dome. I've got my hiking stuff all laid out on my bed. Jim gets out of his last class and he's eager to go. He bursts into my room, shouts "Let's go, let's go" and starts grabbing my loose stuff and running out to the car with it, and throwing it in the trunk. The three of us get in the car and drive from RI to NC. We get out and I sort out the mess of my stuff that Jim threw in the trunk. That's when I discover that my sleeping bag was all ready to go and sitting on my bed in my dorm room back in Rhode Island. I hiked ten days in April with no bag.

It's amazing that I still have all my fingers and toes and most of my hair!

WalksWithBlackflies
01-19-2004, 12:43 PM
Grumpy -

The operative words from your post are "because I just didn’t know any better at the time."

I agree that everyone makes mistakes due to inexperience, ignorance, etc. But when 50-year old men place a rock in a ski trail at the bottom of hill... well, stupid is as stupid does.

dave.m
01-19-2004, 02:42 PM
There was this one guy who hiked into Taft Lodge on Mt. Mansfield in January with a cotton turtleneck. Of course, it got soaked with sweat and turned into a frozen 2x4 before dinner was cooked.

Oh wait... that was ME.

Man, I've been stupid so many times, it's a wonder I'm alive and haven't killed anybody.

stevec
01-19-2004, 03:11 PM
Reading the posts so far has been a treat. Maybe someone can create a book of this stuff so I can take it with me on the trail ?

CaNoE_MaN
01-20-2004, 12:57 PM
I have been lurking here for a while I do not mean to sound rude but how is this an on topic post for questions specific to the North East? Just curious because I have seen numerous post deleted that were as off topic as this. Darren why can this thread stay and others are deleted?

MadRiver
01-20-2004, 02:43 PM
During my first trip up Washington in 1983 I was dressed in my finest tennis attire when the weather took a turn for the worst. I arrived on the summit cold, wet, and without any money with which to purchase nourishment. I wondered around the summit in a daze while mumbling, ”Mommy” hoping some generous benefactor would take pity on me and buy me a cup of coffee. After losing all hope that I would survive this ordeal, my then fiancée emerged from the haze and lead me by the hand to the awaiting train. I sat quietly blowing spit bubbles while holding her hand as we descended the mountain.

sli74
01-20-2004, 02:45 PM
Oh MadRiver, that story had me almost peeing my pants :D :D :D

sli74

MadRiver
01-20-2004, 02:54 PM
Thanks Seema. As you know, I no longer hike in tennis whites.:D

MonadnockVol
05-02-2008, 07:52 AM
I just referenced this thread in another post, (reckless conduct (http://www.vftt.org/forums/showthread.php?t=22155)) but I had so much fun re-reading the entries that I decided to update it. Here are some additions:

When I was in high school I was standing in Tuckerman's Ravine at the base of the headwall when I man tapped me on the shoulder and asked me the way to the summit. I looked to see that he was in street clothes and had a little girl (8? 9?) with him who was dressed in (and I swear this is true) a party dress and black patent leather shoes. I just pointed at the trail down and told them it was the quickest way to the summit. :cool:

Ed Stark, a ranger at Mt. Monadnock, told me that when he's standing at 3/4 ledge on the White Dot trail, he is frequently asked if it is the summit, even though the summit is clearly visible behind him. :D

Cairns are a special target. I once stopped a group of boy on Monadnock from disassembling a cairn to get rocks to throw over a cliff. :eek:

Another time I stopped a couple from taking a cairn apart "because they wanted to see what was stored inside." :rolleyes:

skiguy
05-02-2008, 09:05 AM
While waiting to take the Mount Washington Tour Boat from Weir's Beach out on to Lake Winnie the couple in line behind me asked how long it took to get to the Summit! :eek: ......

dug
05-02-2008, 10:16 AM
While waiting to take the Mount Washington Tour Boat from Weir's Beach out on to Lake Winnie the couple in line behind me asked how long it took to get to the Summit! :eek: ......

And, ladies and gentlemen, we have a winner!!!

woodstrider
05-02-2008, 10:59 AM
Interesting thread. We all have our stories to tell...too many sometimes to be able to pull out just a few, but...

Yeah- Yellowstone..People are just Crazy Stupid there. Everytime that I've been there, the sight of cars pulled over willy-nilly on the side of the road has been like an animal sighting alert, so I pull over, too....wait, I guess that makes me pretty stupid too! :D Of course, I did get to see the Agate Creek wolf pack that way. :cool: :)
But I am not as stupid as to walk up to a Bull Elk in September (or anytime, though I hear that they are rather prickly just around rut time) just to snap off a few pix, as I saw one gent do. For that one I did stop to see if there would be any Elk on man violence ;) , but unfortunately nothing happened :( . I guess that guy got to live and pass on his genius genes- so much for Darwin. :p

This next story is a doozy- and if you've heard it already my apologies...once I was on a Backpack and agreed to share my large tent with a "beginner" who did not have alot of equipment.
The first night, as we were setting down to sleep, my tentmate pulls out a large hunting knife :eek: (OK, it was an average sized folding knife, but dosen't "large hunting knife", or better yet, a Bowie Knife, sound so much more dramatic?) and lays it on the floor between our sleeping bags. A little alarmed, I asked what was up with the knife. I was told that it was for protection, from bears and other sundry wild and murderous animals.
I picked up the knife and folded it up and handed it back to this person and said that the only animal that you might need protection would be from an angry tent owner (that would be me) with a hole in their tent or body. :mad:
Oh no...I think that this is me, again :confused: . Being stupid, again :( . Did I mention that I enjoy solo trips? :D

But seriously, all joking aside (...well, most joking aside), Once I was backpacking and a man hiking solo stopped and asked me a pretty stupid question- I thought he was joshing me, so I gave him a curt answer and moved on. Later it worried me that maybe the guy was out of it and I should have engaged him in conversation to evaluate his need for help.

Usually, though, I have quite a bit of patience for the hiker that I meet on the trail that asks a "stupid question", after all, I was once a novice and asked some pretty dumb things and I have even been accused of stupididty that I will own.
For stupid behavior I don't know what to say...I have seen things done by people that I would not do, and I am sure that I have done things that others would not do.
I just know that with any endeavor there is a learning curve that we all must go through...no speeding it up. Of course, if you've got experience, then there is no excuse and I have read of and been told of some real scary behavior and by really experience people.
Case in point... some years ago in an issue of the 46er magazine, a number of people submitted stories of past "adventures" that they'd had in the Adirondacks. One story, in a nut shell went something like this....

As a very experienced 46er, I took two novices on a winter ascent of Blake and Colvin. We got to the summit of Colvin and ran out of daylight, so I thought that it would be better to bushwhack in the dark back down to the Ausable Road. We got hung up on the cliffs that surrounds Lower Ausable Lake, but luckily we were able to find a rocky niche where we spent the night huddled before a fire (no equipment, of course, this was a day hike). We all survived, Cool!

Did I mention that I hike solo?

The guy who discovered the South Pole had some very interesting things to say about "adventures" . He tried to avoid them at all costs.

cbcbd
05-02-2008, 11:05 AM
While waiting to take the Mount Washington Tour Boat from Weir's Beach out on to Lake Winnie the couple in line behind me asked how long it took to get to the Summit! :eek: ......
I heard it takes longer going up because you are fighting the current upstream... but the way down is like a log floom ride.

DougPaul
05-02-2008, 11:13 AM
Yeah- Yellowstone..People are just Crazy Stupid there.
One guy put honey on his kid's face so he could take a picture of a bear cub licking it off...


The guy who discovered the South Pole had some very interesting things to say about "adventures" . He tried to avoid them at all costs.
Adventures are often the result of something going vary wrong.

A well known quote:
The superb pilot is best defined as the pilot who uses
his superb decisions to avoid situations in which
he has to use his superb skills. --Dick Rutan

Of course, there is the minor problem of how one learns those superb skills.

Doug

Solitary
05-02-2008, 01:15 PM
One guy put honey on his kid's face so he could take a picture of a bear cub licking it off...
Doug

I heard that one too, but Snopes.com lists it as an urban legend:

Kodiak Moment (http://www.snopes.com/critters/malice/bearmaul.asp)

Maybe it should be called a "sylvian legend" ...

Solitary
05-02-2008, 01:40 PM
The following collection of "stupid hiker tricks" has been floating around the internet for some time. I don't know if it is true or not. It is listed as having been published in the San Francisco Examiner. I searched the Examiner site and couldn't pull up this article, but I don't know how far back their archives go. I did find the author, however, who is indeed a well-known Bay Area outdoors writer. So for what it's worth:

WOODSY WHACKOS
Park Visitors Get A Little Squirrelly In Great Outdoors

BY TOM STIENSTRA, SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER
Reprinted in Salt Lake Tribune, Monday, July 8, 1996

A female vacationer, disturbed and in tears, entered the visitor
center for California's Redwood National Park, then searched out a
ranger.

Choked by sobs, she explained she had seen "dozens of Irish setters
lying along the highway," apparently dead or injured, and nobody
was doing anything to help them.

The rangers responded by immediately driving off and surveying the
highway, then returned and explained to the woman that the Irish
setters "were pieces of redwood bark that had fallen off logging
trucks."

At the Grand Canyon, after a one-hour interpretive group hike, the
ranger asked the group if there were any questions. "Is this
man-made?" came one.

At Yosemite National Park, a vacationer walked into the information
station in the valley, sought out a ranger, then asked, "What
happened to the other half of Half Dome?" Another asked, "Do you
turn the waterfalls off at night?"

Yes, people say and do the darnedest things, especially on their
summer vacations to national parks. Many of the accounts were
compiled on the Internet by Steven Willoughby, who runs a humor net
page, and Debra Shore, a contributor to Outside magazine.

Half Dome Half-Wits: Many of the zaniest stories are from Yosemite,
which gets 4 million visitors each year. Last summer, a group of
horrified European tourists entered the Wawona Ranger Station and
said their car had been "blown up by terrorists" and that "powder
residue from the explosive" was all over the back seat.

Inspecting rangers found that the "powder residue from the
explosive" was actually flour from a box of pancake mix, and that
bear paw prints were everywhere amid the powder.

A woman from the San Francisco Bay Area was hiking to the top of El
Capitan on Yosemite's popular North Rim Trail, a seven-mile hike,
when she became lost, saw clouds forming, and called 911 on her
cellular phone and asked to be rescued. A helicopter rescue team
found her. When the helicopter lifted off with her -- and she saw
how close she was to the top -- she asked the crew to land and let
her back out. When the crew declined, she threatened to sue for
kidnapping.

Another woman hiker in Yosemite also called 911 with her cellular
phone, this time from the top of Half Dome.

"Well, I'm at the top and I'm really tired," she told the 911
dispatcher.

"Do you feel sick?" she was asked.

"No, I'm just really tired and I want my friends to drive to the
base and pick me up."

"You'll have to hike back down the trail for that," she was told by
the dispatcher."

"But you don't understand. I'm really tired."

Then, according to a ranger, "her phone battery luckily died."

An Unbearable Way to Wake Up: A backpacker was disappointed that he
never saw any bears, because he kept sleeping right through their
covert nightly visits. So this time, after rigging a bear-proof
food bag to hang from a tree limb, he put his sleeping bag directly
under it, figuring he would wake up for sure when the bears came
prowling. Nope. The camper went into deep sleep, that is, until
he woke up with a shock -- when a bear tried to reach for the
hanging food bag, and stepped right on his chest.

Here's a selection of some of the craziest things ever said and
done at national parks, provided by Shore:

-- Yellowstone National Park: Does Old Faithful erupt at night?
How do you turn it on? When does the guy who turns it on get to
sleep? We had no trouble finding the park entrance, but where are
the exits?

-- Mesa Verde National Park: Why did they build the ruins so close
to the road? Why did the Indians decide to live in Colorado?

-- Denali National Park: What time do you feed the bears? Where
does Bigfoot live? How often do you mow the tundra? What time do
they let the animals out in the park?

Kevin, Judy and Emma
05-02-2008, 03:05 PM
While volunteering at the Mount Washington Observatory an intern told me this story:

Nin, (the former summit cat) had escaped the confines of the Sherman Adams Building and was out for a supervised walk around the summit. An elderly woman peered over the railing of the building's deck and saw Nin below on the rocks.

"Is that a mountain goat?!" she gasped at the intern beside her.

"No, it's a mountain lion," the intern teased.

The woman gasped again, "I guess I need new glasses," she said. :)

KDT

DougPaul
05-02-2008, 04:11 PM
One guy put honey on his kid's face so he could take a picture of a bear cub licking it off...
I believe I heard it while in Yellowstone, possibly from a ranger, most likely in the 1960s.


I heard that one too, but Snopes.com lists it as an urban legend:

Kodiak Moment (http://www.snopes.com/critters/malice/bearmaul.asp)

I recall nothing about an injury to the child.


Here is a story that snopes cannot dispute because I saw it myself. We (my family) watched a guy back a bear cub up against a tree while trying to take its picture. Mama was panhandling a short distance away and came running. The guy backed off and returned to his car. (This was again back in the ~1960s.)

Doug

grouseking
05-03-2008, 12:44 AM
Oh man, these are great. More ignorance than anything else, but it makes for the best stories.

Now for some of my own:

1) At Champney Falls trailhead, getting ready for my first hike ever... people got out of a car, and one person said, "is this the top?" I was 7 at the time, and couldn't believe what I just heard. To this day, I wonder if I was daydreaming.

2)The countless folks on the summit of Washington, who either drive up, or took the cog up, asking me why I could ever hike up when there is a perfectly good road to drive.

3)The guy who asked me if I was going to summit Washington, while on the Pemi East Side Trail. I said yes.

4.) A lady on Monadnock asked me if we could see New York City from the summit. I said no, but LA is in clear view.

5.) Drunk people at Sawyer Pond shelter...this is prob the dumbest thing I have seen. Oct 2005, two families were there, during the flooding we had that year. Mattl and I were out to check the water levels and check out the pond, and one of the guys told us that he got so drunk the previous day that he got lost and couldn't find his way back to the shelter. The two wives just kind of sat there, drinking Wild Turkey with the husbands, while the kids were bundled up in the back, playing gameboy. When Matt and I returned to the trailhead, the stream levels were double what they had been when we came in. The little bridge that we crossed looked like it was ready to float away. I wonder if they made it out ok...I felt bad for the kids. But man....that whole situation just made me shake my head. It was cold, raining, 40-45 degrees, flooding, and they were out camping for the weekend.

6) Oh and how can I forget...maybe this was dumber. The morons who were skiing down the hiking trail of Mt Tecumseh, when you can see the darn ski trail thru the trees. I was nearly hit several times. One person hit a tree, and I almost wanted to say, "serves you right." I was ok with it when it was just kids coming down...I mean it made me mad, but I figured they didn't know any better. But then when their parents followed suit behind them, I almost lost it. Share the trails? Fine. But don't be stupid about things. That still gets to me.

On the contrary I do dumb things all the time. Like just last week...I hiked 12 miles in bad sneakers. My thought..."well 4 of the 12 miles are on pavement, and I don't want my feet to be screaming at me during the walk back." Instead, my arches have been screaming at me this entire week. Duh... Lesson learned, and will prob be making a trip to the doctors at some point soon.

Many more, just cant think of them right off the bat.

grouseking

Whiteman
05-03-2008, 07:23 AM
I also heard the story about the kid with honey put on his/her face, back in 1975. The story was told to us by an off-duty ranger, who was kind enough to pick up a couple of straggley hitch-hiking hippies and give us a tour on his day off. He also had the tale of the fellow who pulled the tail of the bison to get it to stand up for a picture (yep, another bad idea).

He had a bunch of other stories along the same lines, but these were the most dramatic.

ctsparrow
05-03-2008, 07:47 AM
I'm going to pick on myself on this one. B. H. (Before hiking), i was riding the cog on M.W. Above treeline I noticed rocks piled up here and there....I wondered aloud to my now husband....are dead people buried under those?

While i didn't quite get why they were there, as we approached the top, i realized there were far too many to be grave markers!!! :)

ctsparrow

1ADAM12
05-03-2008, 08:09 AM
It was October of 2000 in Yellowstone. I was at the North Entrace of the park where all the parks officials offices are. Well there was a herd of Elk there grazing on the grass (also it was rut time) When a group of asians that did not speak any english were trying to get their pictures taken next to a Bull Elk. They got within two feet of him a guy on each side and their wives snapped the pictures. I thought for sure they were going to get trampled! A ranger came out and wrote them a ticket which I thought was very funny! The other funny part was the Asians were pretending not to speak English or maybe they really did not understand.

At the same Entrance a car next to me was feeding a Raven nuts right from her window. The funny part of this was there was a sign next to her car that said do not approach or feed the animals. A Ranger came out and warned the girls in the car not to feed the animals and pointed to the sign next to their car. When the Ranger was out of site or the girls thought...they fed the Raven again.....big mistake. The Ranger came back and wrote them a ticket as well :D

I never laughed so hard in my life!!!!!!!

Marcy Dam sometime in the early 90's a group of guys maybe 5 or so were hiking in a beer ball. Later the next day while the guys were on their day hike a bear came in and drank the rest of the beer that was left :D

Marcy Damn sometime in the 90's about 10pm. MY friend and I are in one of the lean-to's trying to get some sleep when all of a sudden a man yells out from across the Dam "May I have your attention please" We are like oh great something is wrong! In his next breath he yells out "The NY State Jackpot is now 10 million dollars" I have to admit that was quite funny. We laughed about that one the whole next day while we were hiking.

-Adam

Solitary
05-03-2008, 08:30 AM
Marcy Dam sometime in the early 90's a group of guys maybe 5 or so were hiking in a beer ball. Later the next day while the guys were on their day hike a bear came in and drank the rest of the beer that was left :D


I have to admit this made me laugh out loud ... and then shudder. I know that when it comes to Homo sapiens there are happy drunks, sloppy drunks and mean drunks. I wonder what a mean drunk Ursus americanus would be like? :eek:

1ADAM12
05-03-2008, 08:34 AM
I have to admit this made me laugh out loud ... and then shudder. I know that when it comes to Homo sapiens there are happy drunks, sloppy drunks and mean drunks. I wonder what a mean drunk Ursus americanus would be like? :eek:

MY buddy and I actually saw the bear! It was sitting on his rump holding the beer in his paws. I am guessing he capped it with his teeth. Then he tipped his head back and drank. We took some pictures but of course that was before digital times and I was very bad about putting my pictures in an album :(

skiguy
05-03-2008, 10:44 AM
I have to admit this made me laugh out loud ... and then shudder. I know that when it comes to Homo sapiens there are happy drunks, sloppy drunks and mean drunks. I wonder what a mean drunk Ursus americanus would be like? :eek:

Even scarier if it was a Matts Beer Ball :eek: .....only something someone who went to college in NY State would understand :D

woodstrider
05-03-2008, 10:45 AM
Here is a story, all too true about a bear and honey...I read it on a book on bear attacks in the US. It proved to have some good information on how not to get bite, killed or eaten by a bear, though sometimes it is out of your hands(totally no pun intended)

A parent(s) wanted to get a picture of a bear and their child so they put honey on the kid's hand, thinking that the bear would lick the honey off and they'd get a great picture and a long lasting memory. The bear came over and bit the kid's hand off.

--M.
05-03-2008, 11:03 AM
This is very irresponsible blogging, and I wish it would stop. In the past five minutes, I've read multiple stories about bears, honey and children. If you don't stop writing these anecdotes, eventually the miscreants will stop teaching each other how to open food-vaults and will discover what you're talking about! Bears are dangerous enough as it is without us tipping our hands to them, so please, knock it off! I mean it!

Now, where do you get that commuter boat from Hingham to Weir's beach?

dug
05-03-2008, 12:04 PM
There's a difference between stupid vs. uneducated/unexposed to new & different things. I am quite sure I've been called stupid once I get to the big city and can't figure my way around a subway system, and I've never considered myself stupid.

charlos
05-03-2008, 12:51 PM
i was bouldering in central park in the middle of a problem when a passerby repeatedly asked me the time!

forestgnome
05-04-2008, 06:39 AM
I understand when people describe being close to a bull elk, moose or bear as really stupid, but I do it anyway, every chance I get. I'm just really facinated with all wildlife that lives in the forest, particularly moose. The more I observe them and hang out with them, the more I learn about them. Yesterday I was hanging out with a mama and her yearling bull calf for over an hour. She became comfortable with my presence after a while. At one point I was between them, about 15' from mama. In my opinion, she did not mind my presence.

I'm quite sure that this would be labelled as stupid by many inexperienced people who have read about how dangerous mama moose can be. That's ok. I accept this, and I like it that way if it keeps others from getting close to moose.

Many of us enter into dangerous situations on our own free will. In fact, many drive hours just to do so. I quit viewing someone dangling from ropes off a cliff as stupid because of my own wildlife observing activities. I think most of us view dangerous activities as stupid if they do not interest us. I see no joy in dangling from ropes, but an ice climber or river kayaker might say "that forestgnome is stupid for being so close to a moose". We will do dangerous things if we get joy from them, while viewing dangerous acts that don't interest us as stupid.

Ok, stoke that flame-thrower :rolleyes:

roadtripper
05-04-2008, 12:09 PM
In the fall of 2005, two friends and I started hiking up the Nineteen Mile Brook trail just as the sun was setting on on a Saturday afternoon. We had reservations at the hut and hoped to reach it at around 8pm.

With each of us sporting headlamps, we ran into three kids (probably about 18 years old) standing on the trail approximately 1 mile from the hut. They had only one cheap flashlight between the three of them and they had no backpacks (aka, no food, no water). They hiked with their sleeping bags wrapped around their necks and, sitting beside them, were two full (and quite heavy) coolers full of beer that they had hauled 2 1/2 miles up the trail.

We asked them if they were alright, and they said they were sort of lost. They had heard that there was a hut on this trail and had assumed it would be fine to arrive without a reservation and party the night away. They had no idea how far along the trail the hut was. Finally, they said that due to the weight of the coolers and the dying batteries of their only flashlight, they had to turn around.

They asked how much further the hut was and were disappointed to find out they had to have been within 1/2 mile of it at one point. They were also shocked when we told them that you needed reservations for the huts.

Since they had about 2 1/2 miles to hike down, I'm guessing their flashlight died and they probably spent an unexpected night out in the woods. Probably just another "when i was young and stupid" type story they can tell in the future.

I wouldn't call these fellas "stupid" myself, but rather grossly unprepared.

halia and flammeus
05-04-2008, 08:53 PM
The mishaps make for the best stories! I am so glad to have stumbled upon this thread - laughter is the next best thing to hiking... although, the way Flammeus and I hike, sometimes the two are indistinguishable.

Famous last words:
"I don't usually fall." Kaboom. North side of Balsam (Catskills) (notorious for steep slippery ascent/descent).

"This must be the right way - its heading down." Bushwacking off Halcott. Needless to say... 5 miles of unintended road walking ensued.

"At least there are no bugs." Hiking up Plateau (from the west) in a thunderstorm/downpour. It was basically like hiking under a showerhead.

"Finding cannisters is easy." Well, yes, when the guidebook has detailed (and accurate) directions.

Spoken to us: "You will not make it to the top." Those were some serious fighting words. Of course, no crampons in April on the north side of Katerskill High Peak... we didn't make it to the top. But damn, did we verbally eviscerate our challenger throughout the rest of the hike. (OK, Flammeus didn't. I did.)

These moments are only truly funny because no one got hurt, and we learned from them. I try hard to balance being an idiot and being safe...

;)

MonadnockVol
05-05-2008, 06:32 AM
Since they had about 2 1/2 miles to hike down, I'm guessing their flashlight died and they probably spent an unexpected night out in the woods. Probably just another "when i was young and stupid" type story they can tell in the future.

I wouldn't call these fellas "stupid" myself, but rather grossly unprepared.

YOU WOULD NOT BELIEVE ... well, actually, after reading all of the above, maybe you would ... the number of hikers who go up Monadnock, watch the sunset and then are surprised to discover that it gets DARK after sunset. Some enterprising few have used their cell phones as lights to get down, more often they use them to call 911.

- Monadnock Volunteer (aka Steve)

BobC
05-05-2008, 07:58 AM
YOU WOULD NOT BELIEVE ... well, actually, after reading all of the above, maybe you would ... the number of hikers who go up Monadnock, watch the sunset and then are surprised to discover that it gets DARK after sunset. Some enterprising few have used their cell phones as lights to get down, more often they use them to call 911.

- Monadnock Volunteer (aka Steve)

I was one of those idiots about 20 years ago, when I was young and stupid (or should I say more stupid than I am now). Hiked up Monadnock with my girlfriend, and even refused a ranger's offer of a flashlight at the summit when it was clearly getting late. I remember feeling surprised at just how dark the darkness really was, when you're on a mountain and away from any kind of street lights. Colossal stupidity. But that lesson stayed with me, and now I never go out without at least one headlamp, no matter what time of the day I think I'll be hiking down.

MonadnockVol
05-05-2008, 08:47 AM
But that lesson stayed with me, and now I never go out without at least one headlamp, no matter what time of the day I think I'll be hiking down.

And there's the key thing: you learned from your mistakes. We all make 'em (and if you scroll up a few pages you can read where I tell on some of the many stupid things I've done) and with a little luck we survive and then - we hope - we learn.

Ridgewalker
05-05-2008, 09:16 AM
One time when my scout troop was hiking in Acadia we were introduced to the cairns and their purpose to which one of the scouts asked if people were buried. Having an intellectual moment I answered, "yes dead people are sometimes buried under them, but not on hiking trails."

When I appointed hiking leader for our rainy day assault to Carter Dome I thought the river that divides the Nineteen Mile Brook trail went straight instead of going left where the cairn was(!) Our scout leader did not say anything and kept checking his bearings as we stumbled uphill. Finally he pulled us aside and made a lesson of it and we defined what a scout hiker was and the importance of looking for the white AT blazes.


The last story relating to dumb stupidity was that I came close to walking my entire troop off the Caps Ridge trail. At the time I was oblivious (sp) to seeing yet again painted markers. The same scout leader from the last story informed me that my energy was down and needed to eat gorp.

Lessons learned- Work on your powers of observation. Lucky for us we did not end up on the Accident reports in Appalachia.

roadtripper
05-05-2008, 10:18 AM
YOU WOULD NOT BELIEVE ... well, actually, after reading all of the above, maybe you would ... the number of hikers who go up Monadnock, watch the sunset and then are surprised to discover that it gets DARK after sunset. Some enterprising few have used their cell phones as lights to get down, more often they use them to call 911.

- Monadnock Volunteer (aka Steve)

I was that guy once too. I was 18 and hiked up a small mountain outside Little Rock, AK (Pinnacle Mountain for those familiar) with my girlfriend at the time. Round-trip the hike is about 2 1/2 miles, and we wanted to watch the sunset, so we started up 30 minutes before the sun went down.

The idea that it got dark after the sun sets didn't even connect with us. This trail is VERY scrambly and we got lost several times on the way down. Luckily, it was close to a full moon and we could at least see a foot in front of us. In the end, I think we hiked an hour in the dark without a flashlight/headlamp with a couple of minor falls each. First and only time I'll do that!

SherpaKroto
05-05-2008, 12:56 PM
Just heard this on in Jaunary from the Ranger at Cumberland Island, GA. A few months prior a group were on the Island and one know-it-all kept saying he was a "Horse Whisperer" and could get close to the wild horses there. He proceeded to get down on all fours and slowly move toward a stallion and some mares. When the stallion approached him, he snorted. The stallion bit him on the head, ripping his skull clean. The Ranger told us it took something like 36 stitches in the back of his head to sew his scalp back on.

MadRiver
05-05-2008, 01:09 PM
Just heard this on in Jaunary from the Ranger at Cumberland Island, GA. A few months prior a group were on the Island and one know-it-all kept saying he was a "Horse Whisperer" and could get close to the wild horses there. He proceeded to get down on all fours and slowly move toward a stallion and some mares. When the stallion approached him, he snorted. The stallion bit him on the head, ripping his skull clean. The Ranger told us it took something like 36 stitches in the back of his head to sew his scalp back on.
I hope the horse wasn't injured.

Sugarloafer
05-06-2008, 10:36 AM
I didn't know whether to post this in the Smart People thread or this one. It's about smart people doing stupid things. Anyways, what is it about some outdoor activities that turns the brains of otherwise intelligent and cautious people into mush ? In particular, I notice it in skiing and I'm sure it must apply to hiking too, although I've never encountered it first hand. I've seen highly educated people that you couldn't pay to jay walk in Boston, do incredible things on a pair of skis. Mostly it involves taking excessive risks, relative to their abilities, skiing on terrain that's way over their heads. One of my ski patrol buddies was telling me about a doctor he hauled down to the clinic in a sled. The guy was an intermediate skier in his mid 40's, who thought it would be fun to try some of the tricks that kids were doing in the terrain park....he went off a kicker, crashed and broke his wrist. What the hell was he thinking about ?? :confused: These people must be some kind of closet thrill seekers.

skiguy
05-06-2008, 12:19 PM
I didn't know whether to post this in the Smart People thread or this one. It's about smart people doing stupid things. Anyways, what is it about some outdoor activities that turns the brains of otherwise intelligent and cautious people into mush ? In particular, I notice it in skiing and I'm sure it must apply to hiking too, although I've never encountered it first hand. I've seen highly educated people that you couldn't pay to jay walk in Boston, do incredible things on a pair of skis. Mostly it involves taking excessive risks, relative to their abilities, skiing on terrain that's way over their heads. One of my ski patrol buddies was telling me about a doctor he hauled down to the clinic in a sled. The guy was an intermediate skier in his mid 40's, who thought it would be fun to try some of the tricks that kids were doing in the terrain park....he went off a kicker, crashed and broke his wrist. What the hell was he thinking about ?? :confused: These people must be some kind of closet thrill seekers.


Potential Fame and Glory but most of the time these folks are Adrenaline Junkies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrenaline_junkie) :eek:

BlackBuffalo
05-06-2008, 01:52 PM
4/27 Smokies, NC

A girl standing on the edge of a field said her boyfriend followed a bear and two cubs off across the field into woods. The girl says she's concerned cause he's been gone a while. She yells to her mom in the truck, "Mama, do you have a cell phone signal? I'm kind of worried, I think I should call him."

sierra
05-07-2008, 03:24 PM
One day I was hiking up the tucks trail to climb some gully's and about at the boott spur trail, a woman in a group of 5 woman ask me if she was almost at the ravine, now I try to be helpfull and even can ignore a fair amount of ignorance, BUT this woman was 10 minutes from the car!!!!!!! I simply replied that if she had to ask at that point on the trail she should turn back immedietly, she did not seem to happy with me.