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BIGEarl
02-14-2008, 09:57 AM
Recently, a friend of mine came into possession of a topographic map collection which includes a full set covering New Hampshire and Maine. Significant portions of Massachusetts, Vermont, and Connecticut are also part of the collection. The newest map I found is a couple years short of sixty years old. Some date back to the late 1800ís. This is really an interesting collection in terrific condition. The maps were packaged between two large pieces of masonite for protection. Iíll have the collection for another week but will return it at that time.

Iíve been doing some kitchen-table exploring and came across a number of points that interest me. One is a name change. Iím looking for some help in a little history.

Can anybody tell me when the name of Mount Hight was established? Is there a story behind the change from the previous name, which was North Carter Dome? The topographic map edition I reviewed with this previous name is September 1893.

Thanks

Papa Bear
02-14-2008, 10:26 AM
Recently, a friend of mine came into possession of a topographic map collection which includes a full set covering New Hampshire and Maine. Significant portions of Massachusetts, Vermont, and Connecticut are also part of the collection. The newest map I found is a couple years short of sixty years old. Some date back to the late 1800ís. This is really an interesting collection in terrific condition. The maps were packaged between two large pieces of masonite for protection. Iíll have the collection for another week but will return it at that time.

Iíve been doing some kitchen-table exploring and came across a number of points that interest me. One is a name change. Iím looking for some help in a little history.

Can anybody tell me when the name of Mount Hight was established? Is there a story behind the change from the previous name, which was North Carter Dome? The topographic map edition I reviewed with this previous name is September 1893.

ThanksInteresting.

The 1893 map in the Univ. of NH collection has "Mt. Hight" in the appropriate spot. The map says "Edition of Sept. 1893, reprinted Feb. 1915" and "Surveyed in 1891". I wonder if it was changed when it was reprinted.

Here's the link: http://docs.unh.edu/NH/grhm93sw.jpg

This is also the edition that has Middle Carter and South Carter reversed.

Fisher Cat
02-14-2008, 11:12 AM
This is from "The White Mountains:Names,Places & Legends" by John T.B. Mudge, 1995, p.91 "The exact source of the name of this mountain located between Carter Dome and South Carter in the Carter Range, is not certain. In 1797 there was a farmer named John Hight in the town of Jefferson. Sweetser's guide includes what is described as a legend about two hunters named Carter and Hight who were once trapping together in the region. When they became seperated, they climbed to the peaks above them. Reportedly, Carter climbed to the summit of what is now Carter Dome and Hight climbed to the peak of what is now Wildcat Mountain. For a period of time that mountain was known as Mt. Hight.When the name was changed to "Wild-Cat Mountain" by Professor Arnold Guyot of Princeton, some people wanted to preserve the Hight name. Thus, Sweetser concludes the peak to the north of Carter Dome was renamed Mt. Hight."

BIGEarl
02-14-2008, 02:47 PM
Interesting.

The 1893 map in the Univ. of NH collection has "Mt. Hight" in the appropriate spot. The map says "Edition of Sept. 1893, reprinted Feb. 1915" and "Surveyed in 1891". I wonder if it was changed when it was reprinted.

....



.....

For a period of time that mountain was known as Mt. Hight.When the name was changed to "Wild-Cat Mountain" by Professor Arnold Guyot of Princeton, some people wanted to preserve the Hight name. Thus, Sweetser concludes the peak to the north of Carter Dome was renamed Mt. Hight."


I guess the assumption would be that it changed sometime between September 1893 and the reprint date of February 1915.

Does anybody know if there is a process that captures these events in public record? It seems odd that a few people decided they wanted to preserve a name and simply moved it from one peak to another. Where are the names of peaks registered? Is this a USGS function?

Papa Bear
02-14-2008, 03:16 PM
It's not clear what "reprinted" means. The most obvious meaning would be the map was reprinted from the same copper plates that were engraved for the original. Since the technology of the time would not allow "touching up", it seems hard to understand how a name could be changed or moved on such a map.

The name on the map on the internet (http://docs.unh.edu/NH/grhm93sw.jpg) seems at one with the map in placement, color, font, etc. etc. therefore it would seem that it was not altered. One would guess only the overprinting in the margin was changed.

The only other theory I can come up with is that the place names (in black) were overprinted on the topography (in red) and that that plate was reengraved. But if they went to the trouble change that, you would think they would notice the obvious blunder with Middle and South Carter.

Earl: when you get home tonight, perhaps you could get your 1893 map out and compare to the one digitized by the Univ. of NH. That map simply doesn't look altered.

You might check for example if your map has Middle and South Carter reversed like the UN NH one does.

Chip
02-14-2008, 03:25 PM
I Does anybody know if there is a process that captures these events in public record? It seems odd that a few people decided they wanted to preserve a name and simply moved it from one peak to another. Where are the names of peaks registered? Is this a USGS function?
Cool Question ! This article is about naming Afton Mountain. (http://www.nbc29.com/Global/story.asp?S=5391704&nav=menu496_6_2) It would appear that in 1890 after the Board on Geographic Names was established, the USGS adopted accepted names and left others unnamed. The process appears now to come down to a decision by the town the mountain is located in and then the State and the Board on Geographic Names are informed. But this is only based on what I surmissed by reading a couple articles. There is also an effort, by petition, to name a mountain in VT "Brokeback". I guess the plan is to bring the petition to the town involved and ask for a vote.

This is an article on the naming of western mountains. (http://www.inst.at/berge/perspektiven/daviau.htm)

BIGEarl
02-14-2008, 04:40 PM
It's not clear what "reprinted" means. The most obvious meaning would be the map was reprinted from the same copper plates that were engraved for the original. Since the technology of the time would not allow "touching up", it seems hard to understand how a name could be changed or moved on such a map.

The name on the map on the internet (http://docs.unh.edu/NH/grhm93sw.jpg) seems at one with the map in placement, color, font, etc. etc. therefore it would seem that it was not altered. One would guess only the overprinting in the margin was changed.

The only other theory I can come up with is that the place names (in black) were overprinted on the topography (in red) and that that plate was reengraved. But if they went to the trouble change that, you would think they would notice the obvious blunder with Middle and South Carter.

Earl: when you get home tonight, perhaps you could get your 1893 map out and compare to the one digitized by the Univ. of NH. That map simply doesn't look altered.

You might check for example if your map has Middle and South Carter reversed like the UN NH one does.


I've taken another look at the map and find a couple interesting details.

1. On the map I have there is a scale along the right side of the sheet extending along nearly the full edge of the map. The digitized copy on-line does not have this scale but it also appears that a small portion of that map was clipped. Note, if you look at the bottom-right of this section you'll notice part of the hand written number is gone and Fryeburg is clipped.

http://docs.unh.edu/NH/grhm93se.jpg

2. The names of the mountains were evidently re-done. I say this because the names are in the proper sequence and the names are (s-n):
Carter Dome
North Carter Dome
South Carter Mtn.
Middle Carter Mtn.
North Carter Mt.

Note: South & Middle Carter end with Mtn., North ends with Mt.


It seems likely to me that this is a matter of an update to the printing plates. Perhaps multiple updates were done over time and in the process some errors were fixed and others reintroduced.


3. There is an additional note on the map I have which is printed to the right of the scale at the bottom.

"This area surveyed by reconnaissance
methods. Maps of adjacent areas
surveyed by modern methods may not
join this sheet exactly."


This note is missing from the digitally scanned on-line copies.


This is turning into an interesting exercise.

RoySwkr
02-20-2008, 03:28 PM
Iíll have the collection for another week but will return it at that time.

It would be really great if somebody could compare the maps in your friend's collection with those at docs.unh.edu and see if he has any they don't. They (or Maptech?) will digitize and return any added ones.

If your friend would allow this it would be wonderful.

Dr. Dasypodidae
02-20-2008, 08:40 PM
Hey, great stuff and comments, all of you!

BigEarl, I think that your friend should take out an insurance policy on these maps!

For what it is worth, my 1907 first edition of the A.M.C. White Mountain trail guide, titled "Guide to the Paths and Camps in the White Mountains, Part 1" also still refers to S. and M. Carter in reverse from today, describes Mt. Hight and Carter Dome being severely burned over in 1903, but does not include a map. There are only two maps of the northern and southern Presi's in a pocket, and one small map of the "Carrigain area" (Redrock Brook to Crawford Notch) bound into the volume as page 148.

In my 1916 second edition, titled "Guide to Paths in the White Moutains and Adjacent Regions," many additional maps include a two-page bound-in "Carter Sheet," which retains the reversed S. and M. Carter, as do all subsequent A.M.C. White Mountain trail guides until the 1960 16th edition when they are changed to what we know today.

I am still looking for a copy of the 1917 3rd edition, if anyone knows where I might find one. :)

Dr. D.

BIGEarl
02-20-2008, 09:03 PM
It would be really great if somebody could compare the maps in your friend's collection with those at docs.unh.edu and see if he has any they don't. They (or Maptech?) will digitize and return any added ones.

If your friend would allow this it would be wonderful.

Yesterday I returned the collection. I'm sure it will be possible to gain additional access to it.

I'll see about getting the collection back for a period to compare it to the maps at the UNH site as you suggest. At the very least it would be an interesting exercise.

Earl

BIGEarl
02-20-2008, 09:24 PM
.......

BigEarl, I think that your friend should take out an insurance policy on these maps!

........

Dr. D.


Message delivered! Thanks for the suggestion.

Earl

Raymond
02-21-2008, 03:26 AM
So there used to be a trail up Little Wildcat, eh?

BIGEarl
03-25-2008, 04:50 PM
It would be really great if somebody could compare the maps in your friend's collection with those at docs.unh.edu and see if he has any they don't. They (or Maptech?) will digitize and return any added ones.

If your friend would allow this it would be wonderful.


Sorry for the delay. First I needed to get the collection back and then I needed to make the comparison.

I just finished comparing the maps in the collection to those included in the UNH library of Historic USGS Maps.

Here are the raw numbers....

The number of maps included in the New Hampshire index is 49 but there are five missing from the collection leaving a total of 44 maps. Of these 44 maps there are some that have a different edition date, reprint date, or both when compared to the ones in the UNH on-line collection, twenty-two maps to be exact.

Perhaps the University of New Hampshire would be interested in scanning these maps to include images of them as part of their on-line collection. I have passed the information back to my friend and will be happy to help facilitate any additional steps that are appropriate.

Does anybody happen to know the best person at UNH to target with this information?

It was an interesting exercise. ;)

RoySwkr
03-26-2008, 09:02 AM
Does anybody happen to know the best person at UNH to target with this information?


Apparently it's Meredith Ricker

Depending on where you live, you might also want to read this:
http://historical.maptech.com/about.cfm

erugs
03-26-2008, 09:07 AM
I would suggest contacting someone at the UNH Dimond Library, 862-1534. http://www.library.unh.edu/

BIGEarl
03-28-2008, 07:13 AM
Ellen & Roy,

Thanks for the contact information.

With 22 of the 44 NH maps not currently part of their on-line library I think there would be interest in having digital scans to expand their collection.

I have been given the go-ahead on this. My first contact will be the folks at UNH responsible for maintaining the on-line library of USGS historic maps. I may end up with the folks at Maptech but plan to start with the UNH contacts.

More later, I hope.