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Puck
02-28-2008, 01:08 PM
...wont it be a great spring for blackflies??? :(

Just looking ahead.

forestgnome
02-28-2008, 08:03 PM
I will kiss my first black fly.

Puck, you mentioned winter ticks in another thread. What are the implications of a heavy snow winter for black flies and winter ticks on moose? I'm always looking for a silver lining ;)

happy trails :)

Puck
02-29-2008, 07:56 AM
I will kiss my first black fly.

Puck, you mentioned winter ticks in another thread. What are the implications of a heavy snow winter for black flies and winter ticks on moose? I'm always looking for a silver lining ;)

happy trails :)

There was a thread that coverd this issue in great detail. IICR there is a stage in the tick's development when they attach thmeselves to bushes. When a moose or deer walks by they brush onto thier new host. With ample snow cover these thick can fall to the ground and die off keeping numbers low. I believe the citation was from a NH source.
Here it is posted by Waumbek
http://www.vftt.org/forums/showthread.php?t=6955&highlight=moose+ticks

Mad Townie
02-29-2008, 08:29 AM
. . . and black flies breed in clean, fast running streams. Something tells me we might have a few of those around this spring. :rolleyes:

Jason Berard
02-29-2008, 08:35 AM
I imagine the vernal pools will be around a while longer than usual as well, giving amphibians (and mosquitoes) ample opportunity for increasing their numbers.

forestgnome
02-29-2008, 06:25 PM
There was a thread that coverd this issue in great detail. IICR there is a stage in the tick's development when they attach thmeselves to bushes. When a moose or deer walks by they brush onto thier new host. With ample snow cover these thick can fall to the ground and die off keeping numbers low. I believe the citation was from a NH source.
Here it is posted by Waumbek
http://www.vftt.org/forums/showthread.php?t=6955&highlight=moose+ticks

I must have missed that thread. Thanks to Waumbek for the link from F@G. Well, there's my silver lining to this long, nasty winter! Death to the ticks!!!


happy trails :)

grouseking
02-29-2008, 09:59 PM
Its going to be one heck of a melt...

Hopefully its a slow and controlled one.

Cath
03-01-2008, 09:04 AM
Ever seen the top of North Twin look like a field with little sprigs sticking up through the snow?

Ever seen a wall of snow 10 feet tall entering the summit clearing on Carter Dome?

Ever witnessed snow covering every direction from the summit of Washington to the surrounding Gulfs & Ravines, so that one can ski absolutely any where they want above treeline in Late May?

Ever seen fantastic views of the Presi's from the summit of Waumbek, not just from the Starr King fireplace clearing?

Ticks meeting an untimely death is a fantastic bonus!

Time for the celebratory SNOWDANCE !

hikrgrl
03-01-2008, 09:19 PM
...wont it be a great spring for blackflies??? :(

Just looking ahead.

Is it true that blackflies pollinate blueberries, too?
Which would be good, 'cause otherwise I'd have a REALLY tough time finding anything to like about them...

Klutz
03-02-2008, 07:02 AM
Is it true that blackflies pollinate blueberries, too?
Which would be good, 'cause otherwise I'd have a REALLY tough time finding anything to like about them...

Yep, I hear ya there! I hate those damm things! Then come the mosquitoes, my favorite. NOT! :eek:

rocket21
03-02-2008, 07:18 AM
Is it true that blackflies pollinate blueberries, too?

Quite honestly, that's the first I've ever heard of that. I worked on a wild low bush blueberry farm for a decade.

jrichard
03-02-2008, 08:49 AM
I must have missed that thread. Thanks to Waumbek for the link from F@G. Well, there's my silver lining to this long, nasty winter! Death to the ticks!!!


Is it just me, or did this article only say that only winter ticks are affected? I've never been bit by a winter tick, as far as I know.

I'd love to hear that wood (dog) ticks and deer tick populations will be decimated!

Edit: from what I've found googling, snow insulates tick eggs during the winter so more eggs will be viable in spring.

DougPaul
03-02-2008, 09:45 AM
Is it just me, or did this article only say that only winter ticks are affected? I've never been bit by a winter tick, as far as I know.

The article was talking about moose ticks.

I have no idea if the same applies to other species of ticks, although IIRC very dry summers are hard on the kinds of ticks that affect humans (they dessicate). Don't know about the coming summer, but I rather suspect the spring will be rather damp...

Doug

bikehikeskifish
03-02-2008, 11:23 AM
Empirically speaking, in a wet spring I will find more ticks on myself and the kids after being out in the yard, than I will in a dry spring.

On one hand, the snow may insulate the little bugger, but on the other hand could it be many extra weeks before they are out? Or better still - will they miss a window of opportunity?

Tim

Kevin Rooney
03-02-2008, 11:34 AM
I'd never seen a moose tick until one late April hike up Garfield. It was a totally miserable day - still snow on the trail, blowing rain, just cruddy. The 3 of us (4 with Brutus) just needed to hike, so ... Garfield it was.

About 1/2 up, where you cross into the white birches just before the crest of the ridge, we saw some moose tracks, and then I saw something fall off Brutus into the snow. It was a tick - a huge one, and as we looked we saw many others there. One of my friends knew what they were, and said they didn't pose any threat to us or dogs and probably fell off the moose. But, I still checked him over carefully, and again when we got home.

Ticks and leaches have a huge yuck factor. Mosquitoes, knats, black flies - those I can deal with, but ticks and leaches give me the creeps.

bikehikeskifish
03-02-2008, 11:58 AM
Ticks and leaches have a huge yuck factor. Mosquitoes, knats, black flies - those I can deal with, but ticks and leaches give me the creeps.

Yes but mosquitoes can give you EEE :( :( I'll take 1000 icks over an often fatal brain infection.

(Not that ticks aren't without their own disease problems of course)

Tim

Kevin Rooney
03-02-2008, 12:28 PM
Yeah, I hear yah, Tim, but am talking visceral reactions here, not rational ones!

DougPaul
03-02-2008, 12:31 PM
(Not that ticks aren't without their own disease problems of course)

Rocky Mountain Spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, relapsing fever (tick fever), tularemia, lyme disease, Colorado tick fever, to name a few...

Doug

Cath
03-02-2008, 01:54 PM
Similiar story to yours Kevin............

My hike was to Carrigain, for the month of April. I was about 1/4 mile from the opening on Signal Ridge. I was solo and making fresh tracks in the snowpack. From the south, a Moose had entered the trail and proceed up to head toward the open ridge too. What I noticed first was blood droplets in the snow. Then, I saw a HUGE grey pellet........ an enormous Tick sack :eek:

All the way up to the open ridge, and then about half way up to the summit tower, the trail was littered with Tick sacks............ it was wicked gross.
This poor Moose had been covered with these blood suckers. F & G has said that some Moose make it through the Winter, only to die in the Spring from having the life blood literally drained out of them.

hikrgrl
03-02-2008, 02:06 PM
Quite honestly, that's the first I've ever heard of that. I worked on a wild low bush blueberry farm for a decade.

I don't know if it's true or not...but it was reported on NPR....

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5439362

Kevin Rooney
03-02-2008, 02:07 PM
I had forgotten about the drops of blood, Cath, but now that you mention it - those are what caught our eye and then we saw the ticks themselves. At first I thought maybe Brutus had cut a paw or something, but then realized it must have come from the moose.

DougPaul
03-02-2008, 02:34 PM
Black fly Q&A. Question about pollinating blueberries about half-way down.
http://www.mainenature.org/blackfly/blackflyinfo.html

Also:
Shattering the folklore: black flies do not pollinate sweet lowbush blueberry
http://rparticle.web-p.cisti.nrc.ca/rparticle/AbstractTemplateServlet?journal=cjz&volume=78&year=&issue=&msno=z00-133&calyLang=fra

Doug

bikehikeskifish
03-02-2008, 05:46 PM
What exactly is a tick sack? Is that just a swollen blood-storing part of a large tick? Even Google appears not to know :eek:

Tim

DougPaul
03-02-2008, 07:06 PM
What exactly is a tick sack? Is that just a swollen blood-storing part of a large tick?
I presume Cath is referring to the blood-swollen abdomen of a well-fed tick.

Doug

Paradox
03-02-2008, 07:13 PM
Kill the ticks! Kill the ticks! Kill the ticks! Kill the ticks! Kill the ticks! Kill the ticks! Kill the ticks! Kill the ticks! Kill the ticks!

KILL THE TICKS!!!!!!

Mattl
03-02-2008, 08:32 PM
The best thing that can happen is a cool wet spring, that makes a less tick infested year. Last year was that way, and I never saw one tick. The year before was a very dry spring and was the worst tick year ever..-Mattl

MonadnockVol
03-03-2008, 07:14 AM
Years ago I was studying Blue Monkeys in the Kibale Forest of Western Uganda. After a long day of following a blue monkey troop through the rain forest it was not uncommon to find a dozen ticks on me. One type seemed to specialize in going up into the nose. Prior to that time finding even one tick on me would give me the "heebie-jeebies" and I'd feel imaginary "ticks" for hours afterwards. But Kibale desensitized me: I just do a check at the end of the day and remove any freeloaders.

By the way, only the females bite...

- Monadnock Volunteer (aka Steve)

jrichard
03-03-2008, 06:39 PM
One type seemed to specialize in going up into the nose.


Now that's just gross! I can't imagine trying to fish those nasties out.



But Kibale desensitized me: I just do a check at the end of the day and remove any freeloaders.


It's not the bite that bugs me so much, it's the disease it might transmit.

UNH says 50 to 70% of NH ticks have lyme disease (http://extension.unh.edu/news/LymeDNH.htm), and I know folks who have gotten it apparently from their back yards. I think that compares with a much smaller percentage of disease-ridden mosquitos.