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bigmoose
06-28-2004, 08:39 PM
A fellow climber was insisting the New England Hundred Highest was more of a challenge than the Adirondack Hundred Highest, citing higher vertical gain, tough hiking in Maine's logged areas, etc. I disagreed, pointing out that the AMC's Gene Daniell provides extensive notes and maps to guide climbers on the several challenging bushwhacks...while Adirondack hundred highest bushwhackers are pretty much on their own. And there may be as many as twenty Adirondack bushwhacks, vs. a half dozen in New England. Am I correct? Or is there written information on the bushwhacks in the Adirondack hundred highest?

Peakbagr
06-28-2004, 09:50 PM
Part of the NE 100 is logistics. Long drives, etc. As mentioned, there is also a longer history of climbing the NE100 with a bunch of route descriptions.

Many of the ADK100 are bushwacks with lots of blowdown, nasty stuff and no herdpaths or established routes.
The ADK100 have only had a relative handful of ascents, route info is sketchy, often conflicting, with much word of mouth. There is no record of who has done what and lots of the chatter occurs in private email or on Pete's 46er listserv.

Beyond that, while there are some very helpful climbers who share route info, there is also a group of folks have stubbornly resisted the ADK100 being further organized as a means to keeping these small peaks "undiscovered".
Complicating the matter is that a good number of these mountains are on private land or land leased from timber companies by sportsman's clubs who discourage climbers from getting at the mountains. Obtaining permission or finding legal ways in is a challenge of research all in etself.

Puma concolor
06-29-2004, 01:07 PM
I posted a thread the other day on the Northeast 111 versus the New England Highest Hundred but then decided to pull it, thinking it might get too devisive. But I have no problem comparing those two list as well as the NEHH versus the ADK Highest Hundred. For starters, I am a Northeast 111er and am working once again on the NEHH after a two year layoff (87/100). I think these two lists are comparable ... the 111/115 are more of a physical challenge and the NEHH are more of a challenge in routefinding. That said, at this time, I have no interest in the ADK 100 ... nasty, just nasty is the only thing that comes to mind. Many are long hikes in followed by tough bushwhacks. Unfortunately, the ADK 100 will never enjoy the prestige of the NEHH largely because it is TOO DIFFICULT of a list and will never attract a lot of folks. A lot of folks seem to be talking about it right now though ... it is definitely the new kid on the block. In a way, it reminds me of the White Mtn. Trailwrights list, which seemed to be gaining in popularity just a few years ago and now hardly gets a mention on these boards.

Heading for the Maine coast in a few hours for the yearly family vacation so won't be around to see other responses. Might climb Bigelow the Horns while I'm up there. :)

Peakbagr
06-29-2004, 05:17 PM
Mark,

I had no interest in posing a reply that would be devisive. I agree with your assessment that the NEHH will always be more popular.
As to the ADK100 being so difficult and nasty, thats one of the attractions for me.

PB

mavs00
06-29-2004, 05:30 PM
Difficult Peakbagr????

Are you kidding, I'm still trying to locate half of them on the map. This is my next list, I know it already. NH and the NE is too far for me.

I'll admit, It's pretty daunting looking from the outside in. But the bottom line, Harder/easier, does it really matter. It's about the journey and impact that these peaks have on you. The geographic location matters not one whit.

Be it Marcy, Washington, or some peak thats only identified by a friggin UTM number, they are all special places in their own way.

bigmoose
06-29-2004, 07:01 PM
I think Post'r Boy needs to get whackin' in the 'Dacks...so we can get the real skinny....

peak_bgr
06-29-2004, 08:30 PM
The only thing I have to say is. Well... I hurt after I get done with some of the ADK 100 hghest. Being scratched up, poked, cut, slapped, scrapped, bruised, bitten, stung, sprained, strained, twisted... Do you get that on the NEHH. Over here you get to experience oit all. Sometimes, on just one mountain.

Peakbagr
06-29-2004, 08:44 PM
After a number of trips with peak_bgr and Bushwacker, its hard for me to affirm whether what Spence says is true. He's usually enough ahead of me up the hill that I can't bear witness !

We can say that Tim or anyone else interested in doing these little "gems" is welcome to join us.

PB

John H Swanson
06-30-2004, 07:09 AM
Having done both of them, it is my opinion that the ADK100 are substantially more difficult than the NE100. No question about it. When thinking about it, the question came to mind whether the ADK100 were harder than the NH100. Again, I think so, but this is a more close comparison as you start to get into the more trail-less peaks considering the NH100. The dacks however are by far more remote. Things get interesting if you throw in a 200 ft col requirement to standardize the list qualification protocol. Then for instance the 5 Sawtooths become 11! That'll raise the bar a notch or two.

Peakbagr
06-30-2004, 08:36 AM
Interesting observations from John, one of the most experienced and respected hikers and peakbaggers around here.

John, a few of us were wondering, do you have a rough estimate of how many ADK100 finishers there might be?
And do you know when the ADK100 started getting people climbing them? Was it when they appeared in the ADK guidebook?

Thanks

PB

John H Swanson
06-30-2004, 10:26 AM
... At least 10 years ago, I remember reading a sad article in an ATC trail maintainer's newsletter written by Lee Barry about how his hiking partner Jim Boomer had drowned while fording a creek down south with a full pack. In the author notes it mentioned that Jim and Lee had climbed all 179 Adk 3000 footers. I wrote-up a letter to Lee and actually was able to get it to him by sending it to Grace and having it forwarded to Lee's address on record. Shortly after I got a letter from Lee's wife explaining that Lee could not respond because he was thru hiking the AT. Lee was then in his 70s. Later that year I had a long conversation with Lee and he said that he and Jim had completed the Adk100 in the 1970s and went on to found the Rochchester Winter Mountaineering Society. He and Jim then turned their attention to the 3000 footers (using the same 300 foot col requirement) and completed them. I believe they were probably among the first completers of the ADK100, though I did not ask him. Lee later moved down to the south and his climbing accomlishments there bettered his Adk record.

When Dennis, Sue, Sonny and I were doing them, in the 1990s, there was very little (almost no) evidence of previous climbers. There was one trailless peak with an old (circa 1970s) , steel, canister with an engraved lid that was place by Bill Koozel and Bob? Conrandt. (from memory). I hope it is still there. We did not see other evidence of their travels on other peaks. I heard later that one of these guys had died while solo hiking in CO and his remains were found 6 months later. A scary story to someone that has solo bushwhacked.

There were several others at it during my time including DB Cooper, Bill Cranker, Cat Eich. I had heard that a few old time adkers were at it as well, anonomously. Also, it would surprize me to learn that they were not climbed by a Goodwin or someone else of equal presence in the Adk hiking world. So by 2000, there must be at least 10-20 but probably many more completers.

The adk100 have gained popularity lately, especially in winter. By now, I guess the number is in the 50s.

JHS

mavs00
06-30-2004, 10:35 AM
Originally posted by Peakbagr

We can say that Tim or anyone else interested in doing these little "gems" is welcome to join us.

PB

I'll certainly be taking you up on that. I'm hoping to be done with the first 46 by labor day. That'll put at just over 50. This will be a tough list for me, living 275 miles away and all.

You don't mind if I walk behind you guys though, that way whenever I hear your swear or scream, I can dodge left or right as the case may be :).

Have you guys done the Sawtooth Range? * If so, how bad? Also does anyone have a computer generated list of the ADK100 (I'd rather not type the who thing out from the ADK guide). I'd like to put it on my site (just as a ref.). PM me if you do.

* - Corrected, back to the way I had it. Raymond is quite correct. :rolleyes:

Thanks

lumberzac
06-30-2004, 11:15 AM
Tim I have the list on my computer at home, complete with elevations and coordinates. I could email it to you if you'd like.

Please note that the coordinates were verified by map software only.

Peakbagr
06-30-2004, 03:30 PM
A very interesting thread.

Spence, Brian and I haven't done the Sawteeth yet, but they're looming out there.
We're hoping to do another ADK100 this Saturday, maybe Little Moose if anyone is intereted.
I do know this. The mapwork, research, and asking others who have done the peaks to glean tips on the best routes, is all part of the fun.
While I'm not old enough to know this, my guess is that the ADK100 is probably a lot like doing the early 46ers back in the founding days of the club. Little or no routes, few herdpaths, and lots of discussion on how to get the peaks done.

Peakbagr

Rik
06-30-2004, 08:12 PM
I also find this thread interesting.
First, these are all lists I am interested in and I have been chipping away at the ADK100 recently by trying a few bushwacks. And second because it is interesting to hear some of the local peakbagging history. It's another example of the wealth of information members of this site possess.

bigmoose
06-30-2004, 08:46 PM
John Swanson's ADK history, particularly regarding Jim Boomer, is fascinating. Boomer was a stern, yet compassionate Rochester judge, Supreme Court, I believe. I knew he was a 46r and had climbed internationally, but didn't know he had bagged everything the Adirondacks had to offer. Given his climbing credentials, I always thought it ironic that he died while crossing an inconsequential creek in the Ozarks. It can happen to any of us, any place, any time! Yikes!

bubba
07-01-2004, 12:08 AM
Originally posted by Rik
It's another example of the wealth of information members of this site possess.
Amen! Ain't it great.

Raymond
07-01-2004, 02:29 AM
Isn't it the Sawtooth Range (not Sawteeth)? Northeast of the Sewards?

Technically Sawtooth Mountains.

Sawteeth is the mountain south of Gothics.

ADK3356
07-01-2004, 06:13 AM
When I asked for tips before doing Sawtooth 4, MarK Lowell's response was
"for practice, try straining yourself through
a snow fence". This turned out to be very practical advice.

SherpaKroto
07-01-2004, 07:42 AM
Originally posted by peak_bgr
The only thing I have to say is. Well... I hurt after I get done with some of the ADK 100 hghest. Being scratched up, poked, cut, slapped, scrapped, bruised, bitten, stung, sprained, strained, twisted... Do you get that on the NEHH. Over here you get to experience oit all. Sometimes, on just one mountain.

Spence,
With my recent experiences, heck, I get that on the trail!:(

I like to bushwhack, but doubt I'll ever want to take it up as a full time side occupation. I do admire folks who get out there and beat their heads against a wall of trees for miles. Those are the true peakbaggers - heading off with the sole goal of seeing what is there, and basking in the satisfaction of knowing firsthand.

John H Swanson
07-01-2004, 10:49 AM
...I remember one particularly hard ADK100 outing... I reached into my pocket for my map and the map was gone. The spruce branches had reached in there and stolen it. I got out my first back-up map from my pack and continued on my way. Maybe an hour later and 1/4 mile from the last spot I reached for the map and my pocket was gone. (true) I got out my second and final back-up map and continued on my way. This time being much more careful of my map security as it could easily have determined my fate. I was hiking alone. I dragged myself out of the woods bleeding and exhausted. My cotton work gloves were trashed (it was their second trip) I think I used an entire roll of floss salvaging those pants. I was limping on both legs and couldn't walk correctly for at least a week. It was one of my toughest hikes ever.

As the peakbagging adventures continued, I noticed a tendency to make may back-up maps. The higher anxiety, the more copies I made of the maps (purely subconscious) I think I had over 20 copies of the Sawtooth range.

Dennis C.
07-01-2004, 10:56 AM
As one of several here who have done both of these peak lists (ADK 100 and NE 100), I can offer this : the ADK bushwhacks (other than the 4000 footers) are definitely more remote and difficult, and less information is available to climbers about them. I was ready to call an end to NY peaks with the ADK 100 and Catskill 3500s, but John Swanson convinced me I should continue on with the rest of the NY 3000 footers(!). What an incredible adventure it was! The list we used has a 200 foot New England col rule (instead of 300), so there are closer to 320 NY mountains on it. For those who have interest in any part of this, we are always available for consultation.

bigmoose
07-03-2004, 03:57 PM
I'm glad this thread flushed out Dennis. He authored a nice "teaser" account of climbing the ADK100 in the fall 1996 issue of Peeks. Find a back issue and check out page 13 to get some rare published hints about some of the suggested routes. Question: have the various canisters from these sub-4000' peaks been removed as those 20 from the 46, or do some still exist on tops not in wilderness areas??

Peakbagr
07-04-2004, 10:46 AM
The cannisters are on some of the peaks.

There are some who remove these small, informal cannisters, and others who support and re-place them.

Puma concolor
07-06-2004, 08:57 PM
Just got back into town (woohoo ... only 12 NEHH to go) and just want to say what an interesting thread this has become. The folks who have done both lists definitely have my respect and the same holds true for anyone making a real attempt at doing the ADK100. What a bear of a list it is. One other thing I want to add is that I completely agree that the col/distance requirement on the ADK list makes a big difference against either the NEHH or NHHH as does the general remoteness of the Dacks and the density of the scrub. None of this is to say that the NEHH isn't tough ... any list that includes a significant amount of bushwhacking is on a different level than a list that is all trail hiking.

Peakbagr
07-07-2004, 07:50 PM
A buddy and me just did another ADK100 peak today,Slide Mt (Sentinel Range).
We left the trailhead in Keene at 9:15am and returned at 5:15. With the exception of the .7 mile in and out on the Jackrabbit Trail, we did an additional 7-8 miles of pure bushwacking. While the woods in some spots were open, we spent the day climbing over, under and around blowdown and thick stuff, negotiating small cliffs, and thrashing around the summit ridge looking for the true summit.
We had a great time, but a mile of bushwacking is a lot different than a mile of trail hiking. When we got down to the trail out, it felt so easy that it was like being in an easy chair.

peak_bgr
07-07-2004, 09:17 PM
Sounds like you found yourself going a little to far north or south out of the brook. Brian and I had a cake walk all the way down in that direction. But on the ascent we left the brook to early and faught our way up a little. Our decent brought us right to the col between Slide and Black. Did you find the view I told you about?

Peakbagr
07-08-2004, 08:30 AM
Spence,

We looked at Brian's tracklog and used it to set our waypoints.
We started up off the Jackrabbit trail and tried to stay close-to but out-of the stream. The deciduous canopy was so thick above us, though, that we had trouble following the waypoints and we ended up using the compass.
We ended up coming up the west side of the toe of the Slide summit ridge. While there was never a spot all day that was truly challenging from a "thick" standpoint, the combination of spruce and birch blowdown made for lots of effort. We surely visited every bump and rise on the summit ridge, and the spot you told us about had great views !
We took a head down directly at Black Mt-Slide col and the woods were nice. Just before visiting the col, we cut right and rejoined the Jackrabbit about .1m from ascent.
We discovered a beautful campground about 1/3 from the Jackrabbit along the stream on the way up Slide. There is a herd path that connects it to the Jackrabbit trail just before the large meadow.
Other trips occurred to us yesterday. A bushwack up Black Mtn as well as a bushwack up the back of Pitchoff.
Have a great time in BSP and don't forget Puffer Mt on 7/18.

peak_bgr
07-08-2004, 09:55 PM
Puffer it is. We also found that campsite, but coming accross the outhouse first. What a nice little spot, how many people do you think know about that one?

I was looking at a day trip into the Sawtooth Range to get #4. Check it out, looks like a decent one. We would approach from the Ward Brook Trail.

bill bowden
07-09-2004, 02:10 PM
Re NHHH compared to ADK 100. The NH peaks go down to about 3500 feet depending on which map you use. My records suggest that 75 people have finsihed the NH 100 highest and that about 27 have finished the approx. 180 3000 footeres in NH.

With no ADK experience, I can't compare the two but if it is worse than south Hitchcock, I don't want to go there.

Puma concolor
07-09-2004, 08:18 PM
You guys are KILLING me with this bait. I've been friggin thinking about this list for the last two days. Turns out, between the 46, McNaughton and the fire tower list, I already have 56. Only a couple easy ones left though (Pitchoff, Noonmark ... ). Come next year, I'm going to have to decide between the ADK100 and NY County highpoints. I definitely want to do another NY list (also done the Cats) and will take the winter to decide between these two. Both have pros and cons. Driving to Wyoming County to climb a dung pile is a definite con but so is bushwhacking for four hours to emerge on a viewless summit. The pros are obvious. Decisions, decisions....

Peakbagr
07-09-2004, 09:56 PM
...Only 4 hours of bushwacking?;)

With no trails or even herd paths, doing some of these are harder than most of the 46, regardless of season. With all the crawling around, balancing on blowdown, manuvering thru thick stuff and hauling up and down cliffs, I usually drag my tired body back to the soft front seat of my car with a big smile on my face.

This is as much fun as doing the 46 back when.

Puma concolor
07-09-2004, 11:03 PM
"This is as much fun as doing the 46 back when."

You definitely hit it on the head from my perspective, Peakbagr. Watching your conversation about the 100 on this board can't help but make me think how similar it probably is to the types of conversations that the early 46Rs of Troy must have had. If there is anything sucking me into the idea that this might be something I want to think about trying, that is it. I don't know if that makes sense, but we all know what a different experience doing the 46 now is compared to in the 40s and 50s. While the 46 still make a great list, these mountains are certainly far more accessible than they used to be. Many of the ADK100 are not. I'm only 35 so even if I wind up going with the County HP list for now (which I'm still leaning towards as this offers more of an opportunity to explore parts of NY where I've never been and also to make use of my mountain bike), I still have plenty of time to possibly do the 100 further down the road. Anyway, good luck in your ADK travels.

Peakbagr
07-10-2004, 07:40 AM
Its funny that you mention the early 46ers. I had the same thoughts during a conversation with a friend about climbing ADK100.
It was a really fun thing chasing the 46 thirty years ago. And a letdown to finish. The planning, who's free this weekend, talk about where the herd path were (yes, real herd paths), etc.
We used to remark then how different it was doing the 46 back in the early days of the Adirondack 46ers. No Northway. No ADK trail maps, no VFTT, no high tech, low weight gear. Word of mouth on the best way to do things.

The ADK100 for me is bringing back a lot of the fun I miss from the days when we were chasing the 46 for the first time. The bottom 50 of the peaks are smaller, but the woodsmanship required makes them "interesting".

Dennis C.
08-09-2004, 11:00 AM
"bigmoose", I had forgotten about the articles written about the ADK 100 highest. There's one more some of you may be interested in reviewing: "The Peaks Less Traveled" which appeared in the Spring/Summer, 1992 issue of ADIRONDACK PEEKS.

mavs00
08-22-2004, 01:48 AM
After just jumping into the fray with a short but true bushwhack up Avalanche (#63), I can certainly say that this is definitely a list (ADK100) that I want to pursue. I'm finding the freedom of the open (okay, at times very closed) woods very invigorating. Crazy as it sounds, I can see there is something to pushing your way through the deep penetrating 2nd growth, with only little evidence of man's prior passage, that really is really satisfying. In some ways, just as much as steeping up on a big open summit.

Avalanche was only number 49 for me, but that's a start. Other than about 18-20 "freebies" though, I got all the real tough ones left. I've got solid off trail skills, but limited ADK bushwhacking under the belt , so going along with some of the more hardy soles has been helpful. I'm gonna try to tag along on some more of the upcoming adventures if possible, it certainly helps the learning curve.

Just as one list winds down, another is born. I'm up for the challenge of it, but I know (living 280 miles away) the logistics of it will be real tough, in some ways tougher than many of the hikes themselves. It's a long time venture though. But hey, it it were easy, we'd all do it.

People like John, Dennis and others that have posted on here definitely get a tip of the hat from me and a great big thanks for those that have taken the time to share.

Rik
08-22-2004, 09:40 AM
Mavs,
Nice Avatar. I climbed Avalanche earlier this year and took a very similiar photo. I too like the idea of picking away at that list. I'm up to #63 but don't have any real freebies left! I'm thinking of including TR in a hike Thursday if you are free. It's the closest to a freebie I have left!

bigmoose
08-22-2004, 07:43 PM
Ha!! Another masochist joins the club! Welcome to the wonderful world of 'whackin, Mavs. I would, however, recommend gloves, pants, long sleeves, and especially glasses or goggles for the inevitable close encounters with some of the not-so-nice vegetation, cliffs, etc. (You'll need your eyes to see the maps, GPS, and, of course, the ViewsFromTreeTops!)

Nice to meet you on Avalanche and at Spence's.
May you have good luck and blue skies for Whiteface and Esther!

John

mavs00
05-22-2006, 09:59 AM
As one of several here who have done both of these peak lists (ADK 100 and NE 100), I can offer this : the ADK bushwhacks (other than the 4000 footers) are definitely more remote and difficult, and less information is available to climbers about them. I was ready to call an end to NY peaks with the ADK 100 and Catskill 3500s, but John Swanson

and......


So by 2000, there must be at least 10-20 but probably many more completers.

The adk100 have gained popularity lately, especially in winter. By now, I guess the number is in the 50s.

*** UPDATE ***

Sorry, to dredge up and old thread...... but I thought I'd add an update.. A friend of mine has looked into the history quite a bit and it's my understanding, that likely, at this point no more than 35-40 have finished really finished, with quite a few "giver upers" along the way.

However I know at least 1 that has finished this year and 3 at 99 and will finish soon. I've myself moved passed 3/4 done and likely will finish sometime next year with my 15 y/o son (who climbs with me). Neil will, matching my pace or slightly outpacing me, will likely finish sometime next year too. That's at least 7 that could will likely add to the total (I will, unless I get lost in the Sawtooths ;) ) We are not alone.

The mountains that Boomer and Lee climbed in the 70's are rapidly being lost....... This list is finding popularity, and I just HOPE that everyone chasing it, is doing their upmost to keep the peaks as much like what guys like Dennis and John found when they did them......... From some of what I've seen, they are not :(

sometimes I even feel guilty by climbing them, I just can't help myself..... Anyone else feel that way.....

Okay, This thread will likely fall back to obscurity :cool: . I just thought I'd add that in.

spaddock
05-22-2006, 01:57 PM
Come next year, I'm going to have to decide between the ADK100 and NY County highpoints. I definitely want to do another NY list (also done the Cats) and will take the winter to decide between these two.

Do both. I'm going to work on the 115 and the ADK100 at the same time. Hopefully this will keep me from going "list crazy" with lots of options. Plus I can go to NH and Maine on long weekends and stick to the ADK's on regular weekends.


-Shayne
50/100
54/115

Tom Rankin
05-22-2006, 03:40 PM
Do both. I'm going to work on the 115 and the ADK100 at the same time. Hopefully this will keep me from going "list crazy" with lots of options. Plus I can go to NH and Maine on long weekends and stick to the ADK's on regular weekends.
Hey we've got all kinds of lists for ya:

ADK Fire towers
ADK Quest
Views And Brews! :D

spaddock
05-22-2006, 04:41 PM
Hey we've got all kinds of lists for ya:
ADK Quest


What's the ADK Quest?


-Shayne

Kevin Rooney
05-22-2006, 05:05 PM
Do both. I'm going to work on the 115 and the ADK100 at the same time. Hopefully this will keep me from going "list crazy" with lots of options.

-Shayne
50/100
54/115Hmmm ... so you're working on two large lists simulatanously to keep you from going "list crazy"? Just what would put you over the top? Would you like a referral to "HA"?!

Tom Rankin
05-22-2006, 05:36 PM
What's the ADK Quest?
Quoting the web page below:

The purpose of the Adirondack Quest is to encourage ADK members to explore and appreciate the plants, landscape, diversity of wildlife, and the incomparable natural setting of the Wilderness and Wild Forests Areas of the Adirondack Park.

The Adirondack Quest is sponsored by the Genesee Valley Chapter, which provides recognition in the form of the attractive patch shown above and a certificate.

The patch and certificate are given to individuals who make a total of fifty day trips to the Wilderness and Wild Forest Areas, including at least fifteen Wilderness Areas and at least fifteen Wild Forests Areas, with no more than two trips to the same area. There are no criteria for miles hiked, hours that constitute a day, overnight camping, etc. Activities such as hiking, backpacking, canoeing, bird watching, cross-country skiing, and snowshoeing are all acceptable means of spending the day in these areas. Both ADK members and non-members are eligible for the patch. Visits made after June 1, 1993, qualify for the patch.

http://www.adk.org/ad_quest/index.aspx

spaddock
05-22-2006, 06:31 PM
Hmmm ... so you're working on two large lists simulatanously to keep you from going "list crazy"? Just what would put you over the top? Would you like a referral to "HA"?!

I don't think I'm an addict, maybe I am. I haven't been hiking in about 2 months and am itching to climb something. I figure the 115 for rainy forecasts, and the bushwhacks of the ADK100 for when the weather looks decent.

To me the ADK100 would be much harder from a route finding perspective. Having completed the 46 I know I can climb a lot of peaks, just put one foot in front of the other and repeat about 10,000 times. That and a heckuva a lot of driving. The routefinding though, some of those bushwhacks I have to question, wow, will I actually be able to pick my way to the top? Will I get totally lost? The map/compass/GPS work is pretty fun for me too.

What's sad is when I get hooked on a list I don't think about stuff that isn't on a list. Like my mountaineering trip this summer out west, I should be way more stoked about it. Or going on a canoe trip in Northern Ontario. Or not being on my mountain bike in over 2 years. The ADK Quest seems pretty cool, in the fact that you are doing something more than peakbagging. Chilling out watching birds, experiencing the outdoors more than just flying up a trail and flying back down.


HA might be a good idea, but it beats watching TV.


-Shayne

Kevin Rooney
05-22-2006, 07:07 PM
Go for it, Shayne! I've been in and out of treatment myself for years.

I'm least likely to recognize the list addiction when I'm in the middle of one. It hits me about 2 weeks after I've completed that particular goal, and I make all kinds of rash promises not to do something that dumb again. But, as you say, it sure beats watching TV.