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percious
07-26-2004, 10:39 AM
I'm going to be vacationing on Schroon next week and a half, and I am planning on doing some daypacks. One thing that caught my eye was the eagle slide on Giant. What is the deal with this slide? Is it possible in dry weather w/out ropes? Are rock climbing shoes recommended? How do you get to it? Any information you guys have would be helpful.

-percious

hillman1
07-26-2004, 12:32 PM
I second every question, as I plan on that this august sometime--Another question would be where about do you exit the trail to find the base of the slide. I've heard that climbing shoes are good for that, and the middle finger is a great option.

Rob S
07-26-2004, 12:56 PM
Some info here (http://www.vftt.org/forums/showthread.php3?s=&threadid=2356&highlight=eagle+AND+slide) from a previous thread.

AMF
07-26-2004, 01:07 PM
Originally posted by percious
...What is the deal with this slide? Is it possible in dry weather w/out ropes? Are rock climbing shoes recommended? How do you get to it? Any information you guys have would be helpful.

Did the main Eagle slide a few years back - be comfortable on steep rock. At the time, I thought rock shoes would have made it more fun, but not required. Do not use heavy hiking boots. The approach can be wicked - basically right up the stream bed (roaring brook?). Would not be fun if wet... if a storm comes in, your best bet is to traverse into the scrub on the side of the slide. I would categorize the main slide as a definite 4th class, so if you are more comfortable with rope, use it (but bear in mind there isn't that much pro available anyway, so it will mainly benefit your follower).

percious
07-26-2004, 01:40 PM
Hillman,
Our plan was to do this Aug. 6th. Early-ish start. We wanted to combo Rocky Peak ridge, and spot a car. Both of us have rock climbing shoes which we will probably be bringing. You are welcome to join.

Now we just need to figure out how to get to the slide.... Is eagle on the northern side of Giant?

-percious

teleskier
07-26-2004, 01:41 PM
Best source for info is Don Mellor's book on Climbing in the Adirondacks. It's definitely a class 3, however, no rope required unless you want it more for psychological help with the exposure. You basically take the Roaring Brook trail until it and the brook part ways, then folllow the brook, staying with the main branch at any forks. You just follow it right up to the base of the slide, and if you take the straightest, most direct route, that's the middle finger or whatever, the cleanest and most enjoyable one, I think. It's steep as slides go, but certainly not technical. At the top it's a short easy bushwhack to the trail, and you head left to the summit. I definitely would pick a dry day, hopefully the second of two dry days, and you'll really enjoy it. Rock shoes aren't necessary, but a low cut appoach shoe is more comfortable than a stiff hiking boot, that's for sure.

Guinness
07-26-2004, 01:42 PM
What is the deal with this slide? Is it possible in dry weather w/out ropes? Are rock climbing shoes recommended? How do you get to it?

Having done the Eagle Slide three times, I'll throw my suggestions out.

It can be done in dry conditions without ropes. Should rain begin, do what was previously suggested and move laterally into the scrub. Do not stick around unroped.

I use climbing shoes. I feel comfortable with the extra grip. I used approach shoes once, but felt the soles slip way too easy. A friend of mine did it in hiking boots, but that is for the brave.

Approaching the slide is done by taking the Roaring Brook trail toward Giant and departing it on the left side at 2400 - 2600 feet. There was a cairn on the trail at one time. I am not sure it is still there. Drop down into the brook and follow that up on the left side. You will enter the brook a couple of times. Rock fall will increase as you approach the slab.

Good Luck,
Ed

percious
07-26-2004, 02:03 PM
How does this slide compare to climbing Gothics where the cables used to be?

WalksWithBlackflies
07-26-2004, 02:38 PM
How does this slide compare to climbing Gothics where the cables used to be?

I've been interested in the Eagle Slide as well... how does it compare to the Great Slide on E. Dix?

teleskier
07-26-2004, 02:54 PM
I'd say certainly harder than each of those. I only remember using the cables on the way down Gothics, not up. And the slide on East Dix is pretty easy compared to most slides.

beverly
07-26-2004, 03:01 PM
It doesn't really compare to either the cable(less) side of Gothics or to the East Dix Slide (did that on Saturday).
The Eagle is steeper and you get a much greater feeling of exposure. I wouldn't feel comfortable on the Eagle in hiking boots. As soon as the steepness starts, I switch to rock shoes and my comfort level goes up exponentially. I've followed friends up who were climbing the slide in low-cut approach shoes. They would have to pick their way up some spots, where I could walk straight up.
When you get near the top there are some great perches to sit and have lunch on - and the best part is that you'll escape the crowds on the summit.
:D

hillman1
07-26-2004, 04:07 PM
Unavailable on the 6th--wish I could go. Normally, I'd be hiking this weekend too(31st), but I've finally finished my 46er quest, leaving me open to go to the deerfield festival in mass. I've nearly forgotten what kayaking is like...

Tahawus
07-26-2004, 10:31 PM
Warning, warning reminescence coming!

I did the Eagle back in 78 when was 15. That was in the days of big ole boots with Norwegian welts. At one point we were going over a bit of a heave and I was sure my boots were starting to lose traction. I froze searching for a way to move that wouldn't start me sliding backwards - I never thought, is that why they call it a slide? - and yelped, "oh shit, oh shit". Another member of our group, kafka was his name stretched and grabbed my arm pulling up hard enough to give me enough confidence and traction to make it past that heave. From there on I covered the side of the slide within reach of the Balsams growing there.

Now I know that, the approved technique for getting the best grip on rock is to lean back a little bit keeping your weight over your feet and stay offyour toes keeping as much of your sole in contact with the rock as possible and if i could have stuck to this I probably would have had no problem. It is damn hard however not to press yourself to the rock and grasp for any handholds you can find when it starts getting steep.

WalksWithBlackflies
07-27-2004, 08:59 AM
Well, thanks for shooting down my confidence. I just climbed the E Dix slide last weekend and had a great time scrambling to the top. I took a line straight up the "headwall" instead of taking the trail along the right side of the slide. Maybe this accounts for the discrepency in opinions of difficulty? Hope so. True, there were plenty of hand/foot holds and perches, but I can't see how the terrain could get much steeper (see photo). Maybe I just need to get onto more slides :p Any excuse to get up to the mountains.

AMF
07-27-2004, 09:28 AM
Originally posted by rico
.... there were plenty of hand/foot holds and perches, but I can't see how the terrain could get much steeper...

Make no mistake... Eagle is steep, and the consequences of a slip severe. At its steepest, you need to look closely for any little indent or nubbin that will give a foothold. Its a blast!

teleskier
07-27-2004, 10:29 AM
Well, I think the variety of responses you've gotten just reflects the variety of people's comfort level on steep terrain. You've gotten good advice, though - as much as possible, try to be upright, with your weight over your feet. For the most part, your grip will come from friction rather than footholds, so having your weight directly over your feet maximizes that. You can reach your arms out to balance and grab the occasional hand hold, but the more you lean into the rock, the more your feet will tend to slip.

As for rock shoes, it's kind of a zen question. If you have 'em, odds are you won't need them, only because you've probably climbed a bit, have good technique, and could go up it in sneakers. (Actually, that's not as crazy as it sounds. Since most of your grip comes from friction, a softer shoe that contacts the rock as completely as possible is preferrable.)

If you don't have them, then you probably haven't climbed much or at all, and the sticky soles would be nice. But, rock shoes are notoriously uncomfortable for long walks, which is basically what this is, so myself, I prefer my old five-tennies for slides.

Anyway, it's not like you're goint to "fall off" it. But, there are certainly some places where I wouldn't want to fall because you might roll a while before you came to a stop! But people climb it all the time in various degrees of preparedness, and accidents on it are pretty rare, so that should tell you something. Enjoy it - it's spectacular!

Thunder Dan
07-27-2004, 01:50 PM
Here is a link with some good information about climbing the Eagle Slide on Giant:

http://www.summitpost.org/show/route_link.pl/route_id/1805/object_id/435

percious
07-27-2004, 02:20 PM
Thanks Thunder Dan. Exactly the info I was looking for.

-percious

WalksWithBlackflies
07-27-2004, 03:44 PM
Yes, very nice Thunder Dan. Percious, I'll let you be my guinea pig :D. Have fun, and tell me how it went!

peak_bgr
07-27-2004, 06:01 PM
When I did the Eagle Slide it was a couple days after a rain. We followed Roaring Brook right up to the base of it. We then thried to aim our climb to the second feather, which we were told was the more moderate one. I would say it was the toughest slide climb I've ever done. Very slippery when wet, I found myself stuck between a wet section and a too steep section. I had to make a standing leap for another dry section, talk scared, it would have been me bouncing down a twenty foot section of cliff into the trees.

To make a long story shorter, if you have climbing shoes bring them, you'll feel much safer. I did it in regular hikers, and the footing was very shotty.

percious
08-11-2004, 09:56 AM
Ok, we survived. Our plan was to hit the Eagle slide on giant. I think we missed it, but had an enjoyable time climbing anyway. Our plan was to hit the shelter in the valley between Giant and Green, which we did. From there, we continued Magnetic South until we could see a slide. I believe the slide we emerged on is in the background of this picture:

http://www.summitpost.org/mountains/photo_link.pl?photo_id=48651&object_id=435&type=mountain&mountain_id=435&route_id=1805

So this is NOT the eagle slide, by my estimates. It is however, a very long, and enjoyable slide, and I would do it again. Bushwhacking to the base proved challenging due to blowdown, but non-the-less fun. I have learned that it is best to skirt the blowdown. What is great about this whack is that you can see the slide for about 1/2 of it, so it is easy to find your way there.

Once on the slide, we donned our rock shoes, which was probably a mistake. 50 yards up the slide there was a trap of trees, which caused us to switch back to boots. It's not too steep below the tree trap, so, hiking boots would suffice. Further up the slide however, rock shoes are advisable. After a long climb with magnificent views, we reached the top. From there it was a fight through a wall of pine trees, skirting blowdown where possible to get to the summit trail. This slide puts you about 1/10th of a mile from the summit of Giant.

From there, we continued on towards RPR, after a wet lunch. We ate in a cloud, glad to be off the slide before anything more then a drizzle came. Rocky Peak Ridge is spectacular. As we descended from the (2nd) summit, we could view Mary Loiuse Pond, behind that Bald Peak, and finally a rainbow. It was interesting to look down on a rainbow. To bad we forgot our cameras. RPR->MLP is awesome. Wild flowers, endless Alpine Zone, and interesting cairnes. I think RPR is my favorite high peak, out of the 22 I have completed. The views are also great, but would have been even better if the weather had been nice. I look forward to visiting again.

After leaving the alpine zone, and making it over the blueberried path over Bald hill, the trail was difficult. We were tired from our slide climb, and there was no water to be seen, after that alpine pond. We were thirsty. On the last 100 yards or so we passed a group of fresh hikers heading in, inquiring jokingly "are we there yet?" No. But I hope they made it there, and enjoyed the journey along the way.

RPR is definately a trail that expresses the idea that the journey is often better then the destination.

-percious

beverly
08-11-2004, 10:23 AM
You headed south from the valley between Giant and Green? It sounds like you were on the other side of Giant.:confused:

AMF
08-11-2004, 10:30 AM
Originally posted by beverly
You headed south from the valley between Giant and Green? It sounds like you were on the other side of Giant.:confused:

My thoughts as well... the link to the photo is definitely the Eagle Slide area, but P's description sounds way off. There are some slides on the north cirque...

Thunder Dan
08-11-2004, 10:47 AM
The link referred to above, as well as below is definitel Eagle Slide, on the west face of Giant Mountain. I am sure of this because I took the picture.


http://www.summitpost.org/mountains...5&route_id=1805

It is true that there are some rock slides on Giant's east face and Percious, you may have been on one of them.

Thunder Dan

percious
08-11-2004, 10:55 AM
The red marker indicates the slide which we climbed.
Again, NOT the eagle slide.


http://www.percious.com/giant-slide.gif

Anyone know the name? Its a beautiful slide, but I wouldnt try it unless it was dry.

-percious

beverly
08-11-2004, 11:20 AM
Looks like you were definitely on the NE side of Giant - don't know if this has a name - I doubt it.
You were a long way from Eagle, which is on the western face of Giant, partially shown at the bottom of your map!
:D

percious
08-11-2004, 03:01 PM
Well shucks, I guess I'll just have to go back to Giant again, in order to really climb Eagle. Next time I will know to bushwhack off the valley trail directly to eagle, and skip the shelter. The eagle slide looked pretty steep from afar, in comparison to what we climbed. I think we did more mileage the way we went, and the whack to the top was longer. My buddy is 46er trailessing, so maybe I can convince him to go up Eagle with me. I definately wouldn't mind re-visiting RPR.

-percious

Guinness
08-11-2004, 07:39 PM
Hi percious,

When do you plan on doing the Eagle slide climb. I've done it 3 times and I am always interested to going it again. Never get enough of a good thing.

Ed

peak_bgr
08-11-2004, 08:37 PM
I think we should call it Percious.

I checked it out when I climbed Green last year. Very impressive from that point of view.

Neil
08-11-2004, 09:50 PM
If I do the Eagle Slide it sounds like it would be good if I knew what the 2nd feather was. Can someone describe it?

percious
08-12-2004, 09:02 AM
peak_bgr: I wouldnt be apposed to having a slide named after me :D . My son is already named after a mountain... I'd rather call it the Perkins slide, but I don't think I was the first to climb it. It is a beautiful and long slide. How is green? A total bushwhack? Looking from the slide, there was a distinct separation between forests east and west. My guess is that it had been logged at one time.

ADK4487: I dont plan on climbing it any time this year. I get about 6 trips a year (agreement with wife), so I have to be choosy. I am trying to finish out my 46, I have 22 so far. Actually, im 22/46 3/5 4/48 0/12. You can see where my loyalties lie. I will keep you posted for the future Eagle trip. My buddy is bushwhacking his 46 (think i already mentioned) So I am sure that I would get a chance to do it in the next year or 2.

-percious

peak_bgr
08-12-2004, 04:25 PM
Green is a bushwhack, and totally different woods from ne side to the next. Really amazing the change in density of the trees.

The second feather is the second distinct slide on the eagle from the right. At least, that's what I was told it was refered to; and that is the one we were on. The base of the slide from the outlet that feeds it leads to the second feather. I remember it being very sandy and loose at the base before it turned to open slab.