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View Full Version : Hammocking at Guyot Campsite?



Undershaft
09-19-2012, 08:05 PM
I'm planning a trip to the Bonds next week and I intend to stay at Guyot Campsite. I've never been to Guyot before so I was wondering if there are trees at the campsite suitable for hanging a hammock?

NH Tramper
09-20-2012, 07:38 AM
I'm planning a trip to the Bonds next week and I intend to stay at Guyot Campsite. I've never been to Guyot before so I was wondering if there are trees at the campsite suitable for hanging a hammock?

There are plenty of trees there so I'd say yes. Should be no problem.

peakbagger
09-20-2012, 07:42 AM
Given the reported bear issues at Guyot this year, make sure you dont have anything smelling of food in your hammock or you may become a "bear pinata":)

Tom_Murphy
09-20-2012, 05:28 PM
Yes, there are a number of trees with a right combination of tree diameters and distance apart.

I have used my JRB bridge hammock at Guyot, 13 Falls, Sawyer Pond, and Ethan Pond without any issues.

No idea about Liberty Spring but that is probably my next one.

Undershaft
09-22-2012, 03:45 AM
Thanks for the information, thats exactly what I needed to know. It will be much easier carrying my hammock than my tent, which is three pounds heavier. Tom, its been about seven years since I camped at Liberty Springs, but I met a thru-hiker there who used a hammock and found trees pretty easily. That was the first time I saw a hammock in use and it convinced me to buy one.

grouseking
09-22-2012, 07:01 AM
Question tp the hammock users-

How do you guys stay warm? I tend to have a lot of body heat for reserves, but still I tend to chill easily, esp outside. Even right now my nose is freezing inside.:confused:

DougPaul
09-22-2012, 12:11 PM
Question tp the hammock users-

How do you guys stay warm? I tend to have a lot of body heat for reserves, but still I tend to chill easily, esp outside. Even right now my nose is freezing inside.:confused:
They are cooler than tents--you have free airflow under you and the hammock wraps up around you which compresses the sides of your sleeping bag. There are two basic strategies--line the bottom and sides with insulating pads or some hammock designs (separate fly and body) allow one to put a tubular sleeping bag around both the user and the hammock.

I have slept out on a 20F night (using a 0F bag and 2 72"x20" pads) and a friend has slept out on a -5F night using a tubular bag.

Doug

RoySwkr
09-23-2012, 01:36 PM
Why do you stay at fee campsites with a hammock?

One advantage of a prepared campsite is it has a flat pad or platform for a tent, whereas a hammock can be used most anywhere with trees on sloping or rough ground. The most attractive feature of a hammock for me would be to camp whenever I was tired or it got dark instead of having to deal with relatively few choices.

MichaelJ
09-23-2012, 01:48 PM
Well, it's the only place up in that area with water, and isn't the fee season over at this point?

Tom_Murphy
09-23-2012, 04:15 PM
Yes, one of the main advantages of a hammock is not needing a flat spot and thus being free from the backcountry camp sites.

But, when the other people you are with don't have hammocks, you typically end up at those sites anyway.

I use an underquilt and a top quilt for insulation. The under quilt attaches to the bottom of the hammock and avoids being compressed. The top quilt is inside the hammock, just like a quilt in bed.

Overall, there is a weight penalty to using a hammock vs a solo shelter but the advantages are site selection and comfort.