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View Full Version : Nice article on the Clarks Trading Post Bear in the Globe



peakbagger
01-07-2013, 07:49 AM
I expect some folks who oppose captured wild animals performing will object but for the majority of the hiking public this is nice read about a bear and its trainer at Clarks trading post in Lincoln

http://www.boston.com/news/local/new-hampshire/2013/01/07/bonds-endure-between-trainer-and-bear-new-hampshire-amusement-park/nZfyf6ozb2rDH2cMX1ARsJ/story.html

erugs
01-07-2013, 08:40 AM
I agree that was a nice article. Clarks has been there for so long and I like that it is still a family business. We brought the granddaughters there and were impressed by what we saw. (Aside from preferring to see animals in the wild, but see education as important, too.)

Maddy
01-07-2013, 08:57 AM
I expect some folks who oppose captured wild animals performing will object but for the majority of the hiking public this is nice read about a bear and its trainer at Clarks trading post in Lincoln

http://www.boston.com/news/local/new-hampshire/2013/01/07/bonds-endure-between-trainer-and-bear-new-hampshire-amusement-park/nZfyf6ozb2rDH2cMX1ARsJ/story.html

No denying that. As I read the article i substituted my name for the word "bear". I couldn't help but reflect on what it would be like to spend an entire life doing something that is so opposite what nature intended me to be. Would I like to live in an enclosure to be on exhibit and taken out to perform? I think not.
Would I give two hoots if I were a bear about having a BD party? Maureen isn't mommy and this bear in not "baby" or "pumpkin pie." In Maureen's eyes, this magnificent creature might have been a "gift" to her, but given his druthers I don't think the bear regarded himself as a "gift". His life as a bear was over the day she accepted him as such. He could have been placed in rehab and eventually released into the wild.

This bear did not choose this way of life. He was forced into it. The only humans who get to live the same kind of life are the ones we put behind bars because they are a danger to society. We demand to be treated with respect and are appalled when we are not. Why do we not think that wildlife deserves the same?

At the bottom of my post is a pic a bear that has been treated for several months, and will finally be released back from whence he came this coming Wednesday,
One thing is certain. He is in no mood to be put on display or live out his days in confinement.
Each and every time we have to approach to clean his enclosure, and feed him, he bluff charges. He is doing he "bear thing". We are in no danger because we are able to close the gate between the two sections. HE hates us and that is as it should be. We don't treat him like "baby" and we don't refer to ourselves as "mommy" or "daddy". He has been given a second lease on life by humans who respect him for who he is... a wild animal. We don't go in and gawk at him, or engage him in any way. The only time we have any contact with any wildlife is for direct care only. Their enclosures remain covered and the environment is kept very quiet so as not to disturb them more that we have to. We speak only if absolutely necessary and we whisper. This is called "respect".

I will freely admit that for me this was anything but a nice read. It made be very sad to know that this magnificent animal never had a prayer. The "gift" was given a life sentence without the possibility of parole.

This will be my one and only post on this topic. I have shared all that I have to say. I doubt I will visit this one again. It's to upsetting and something I would rather not think about because there isn't one small thing I can do to change it. Best to focus on the work I do because there I can make a difference.

Stan
01-07-2013, 03:29 PM
I will freely admit that for me this was anything but a nice read. It made be very sad to know that this magnificent animal never had a prayer. The "gift" was given a life sentence without the possibility of parole.
I agree that a lot of animals in captivity lead a very sad existence ... but then, I'm making some human assumptions about what constitutes a sad existence. It has been a good trend that animals in captivity have been placed in much more "humane" conditions, real life habitat types of places without the survival stress. I think this can serve a worthwhile purpose in educating the public and developing an appreciation for wildlife that elevates the animal from a source of food, fur and leather. Big Cat Rescue in Tampa, FL and the Mass. Audubon Sanctuary in Lincoln, MA come to mind as two places that serve that purpose well.

The article had a video of the owner of a black bear which is every bit as docile and trained as a golden retriever. Should golden retrievers be released to the wild at birth, too?

kiteflyer
01-10-2013, 07:45 AM
Stan, Thanks for sharing this. I thought it was a wonderful story, Dave

Maddy
01-10-2013, 11:29 AM
I agree that a lot of animals in captivity lead a very sad existence ... but then, I'm making some human assumptions about what constitutes a sad existence. It has been a good trend that animals in captivity have been placed in much more "humane" conditions, real life habitat types of places without the survival stress. I think this can serve a worthwhile purpose in educating the public and developing an appreciation for wildlife that elevates the animal from a source of food, fur and leather. Big Cat Rescue in Tampa, FL and the Mass. Audubon Sanctuary in Lincoln, MA come to mind as two places that serve that purpose well.

The article had a video of the owner of a black bear which is every bit as docile and trained as a golden retriever. Should golden retrievers be released to the wild at birth, too?

In response to your last question...only if you want a big fine and possible jail sentence. I believe they call this animal abuse because they are domestic pets.

I don't think we can compare a circus atmosphere and living behind bars with a "natural habitat" protective environment. There is also a great bear center and wolf center in Ely, MN. They both have web sites. Excellent resources.

As for animals feeling sad, lonely, etc. have you watched any wildlife shows on PBS or Nat Geo Wild? They sometimes cover this topic so keep an eye out. Lots of research has been done and made available to us.

Peakbagger wrote

I expect some folks who oppose captured wild animals performing will object but for the majority of the hiking public this is nice read about a bear and its trainer at Clarks trading post in Lincoln


I was WARNED. AS Peakbagger wrote "For the majority of the hiking public it would be a NICE READ!" He was savyy to this from the get go and I had no clue. How naive can one be? I believed that hikers, of all people, would be averse to bears being treated in this way. Not so. They LOVE it! Thus far I have I heard from one person who thinks I make a good point. Spent lots of time today writing a post about that bear but deleted it. One comment I received made me wonder why I bother to go to work. After reflecting on the PM's and replies to the first post, I accepted that there was no point to writing more on the subject. I love wildlife and would do anything to help them. I need to be around people who support that POV. Fortunately I have lots of exposure and appreciate them now more than ever.
I think we can safely say I am "not the part of the majority of the hiking public." So much for being a part of VFTT.

When all is said and done the "bear" taught me an incredible lesson and he is not even aware. Often we learn important life lessons when we least expect it, and from the strangest sources. The bear wanted one thing...to be free. So do I. Tonight I can say with certainty we are both free. No looking back. It's been quite the ride.

Keep on keepin' on. Happy hiking!