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Technetium
05-05-2014, 09:23 AM
I googled for this but couldn't find anything. It's easy to find a list of NH mountains ordered by elevation of the summit, but in terms of building up stamina with increasingly difficult hikes (with not too great a gap between each hike), a list of hikes by elevation gain would be far more useful. For example, I seem to recall that Chocorua from the Rt 16 side is fairly hard for the sub-4k elevation, while something like Tecumseh is not much harder than Mt Monadnock. Anyone know of such a list? Obviously elevation gain isn't the only thing that matters (mileage is important, too), but I can start with that.

RoySwkr
05-05-2014, 09:31 AM
The same peak can have vastly different elevation gains depending on route, for instance Kearsarge South 400', 1100', or 2200' depending on trailhead

I suggest that you list the summits you are interested in, then sort the elevation gains of those peaks, as even if an elevation gain site existed it would have hundreds of entries just for NH

Technetium
05-05-2014, 09:48 AM
Yeah, that's basically what I meant... not a list of summits, but routes up summits. That was why I made the point about Chocorua from Rt 16, because it's almost 3k from that side but only a little over 2k from the Kanc side.

So the list would be a lot longer than a list of peaks. I guess I just figured that somebody would have put together a list like this at some point.

bikehikeskifish
05-05-2014, 10:30 AM
http://home.earthlink.net/~ellozy/difficulty.html

Does this work for you?

Tim

Technetium
05-05-2014, 10:57 AM
Yes, it's a good start. I might just try to put together a list like this myself when I have time.

TJsName
05-05-2014, 11:44 AM
Yes, it's a good start. I might just try to put together a list like this myself when I have time.

The WMG does a good job of giving total stats from base to summit for any trails that hit up a significant peak. For instance, If you look up the Champney Falls trail, it will give you the elevation and distance to the summit, even though the trail ends at the Piper trail (look for the 'via...' language).

If you compile all of this, then you can make the website and post it here. :)

DayTrip
05-05-2014, 07:13 PM
The WMG does a good job of giving total stats from base to summit for any trails that hit up a significant peak. For instance, If you look up the Champney Falls trail, it will give you the elevation and distance to the summit, even though the trail ends at the Piper trail (look for the 'via...' language).

If you compile all of this, then you can make the website and post it here. :)

2nd that. The newer White Mountain Guides have elevations for all parking lots and trail heads so you can calculate exact gain if you're so inclined. I've almost done this a few times until I realized it could take a bit.

Mohamed Ellozy
05-05-2014, 08:03 PM
;)
http://home.earthlink.net/~ellozy/difficulty.html

Does this work for you?

TimThanks for the plug, Tim!!

I have the spreadsheet from which this table was derived, and of course it can be sorted by any column, including elevation gain (the web page is sorted by book time). It is currently in Open Data Format (.ods) but I can probably make it available (should anyone want it :rolleyes:) in other formats.

Link in Google Drive (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1T69xTtKnVXwSxJAbb_qc6L7U2jIEGFtogrIUzmrRmQU/edit?usp=sharing) format.

JCarter
05-06-2014, 09:51 AM
Wow. Isolation by Glen Boulder is the most elevation gain... But no love at all for Isolation via Davis Path :-)

Driver8
05-06-2014, 10:06 PM
...but don't forget to add in the gain from the PUDs (pointless ups and downs) to get the total gain from start to finish. This can really add up over the course of some longer trails.

Smith and Dickenman's excellent 4000-Footers of the White Mountains book includes those PUDs in their elevation gain figures. For instance, Lafayette via OBP is an approximate net gain of 3370' from trailhead to summit, but there are a couple of intervening ups and downs, chiefly from near the hut to Eagle Lake and back - about 100' each way - so that the total elevation gain is billed as 3600'. My legs definitely felt that extra 100' on the way back to the hut from the summit on my first visit to Lafayette.

bikehikeskifish
05-07-2014, 06:21 AM
;)Thanks for the plug, Tim!!

I plug it all the time :) It's a useful reference for those starting out.


Tim

jniehof
05-07-2014, 12:31 PM
Smith and Dickenman's excellent 4000-Footers of the White Mountains book includes those PUDs in their elevation gain figures.
WMG does, too, although I don't want to undermine a plug for the 4000-footers book! Note that the elevation figures are from counting contours on the map, not some sort of magic, so all that obnoxious sub-contour stuff on Garfield Ridge doesn't count.