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View Full Version : Thermo-molding? Rossignol X7 anyone?



HikerBob
03-02-2005, 03:40 PM
Further to my earlier post on the Alpina 1550's and pinched feet. I've been looking for possible alternatives that might accommodate my wide feet better.

REI has the Rossignol X7 Backcountry ski boot (http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?catalogId=40000008000&langId=-1&storeId=8000&productId=47833403) on sale and one if the features is a thermo-moldable foam lining.

When I emailed Rossignol they said "The retailer uses a heat gun, you then wear the boots for 5-7 minutes and they are done." When I talked to the guy at an REI he said "Nope. We've never thermo formed any backcountry boots, don't do it."

So, anyone have any experience with this boot?

Thanks,
Bob

David Metsky
03-02-2005, 03:55 PM
All the current crop of plastic tele boots from Garmont and Scarpa use thermo molded liners. They are warmer and lighter than previous boots, and they should fit much better. Try either Wilderness House or EMS Comm Ave, they both have the thermo ovens in the stores.

-dave-

HikerBob
03-02-2005, 04:01 PM
Dave - thanks for the info. Looks like a trip to the city this Saturday instead of the mountains!

Bob

DougPaul
03-02-2005, 07:33 PM
All the current crop of plastic tele boots from Garmont and Scarpa use thermo molded liners. They are warmer and lighter than previous boots, and they should fit much better. Try either Wilderness House or EMS Comm Ave, they both have the thermo ovens in the stores.


REI in Reading MA may also have the thermo oven in the store. (I was there when a customer and a salesman headed off the thermo-fit the liners. Didn't actually see it done.) Call the store to make sure.

Doug

David Metsky
03-02-2005, 10:06 PM
Good point Doug, the various REIs in the greater Boston area have different specialties. The only one likely to have an oven is Reading. But you can easily heat mold the boots in your own oven, there are webpages with the full details. It's a pretty simple operation.

Don't know about those particular Rossi boots, though.

DougPaul
03-02-2005, 10:21 PM
Come to think of it, the REI customer was buying Scarpa T2s. Don't know if one oven can be used for both brands. Guess my original suggestion still applies: call first.

Doug

HikerBob
03-03-2005, 06:31 AM
With this particular boot I think the important thing to note is that it says they have thermo-moldable linings not liners. Feedback from Rossignol said that a heat gun is used to heat the lining. To use an oven the entire boot would need to be put in, maybe a little risky.

I'm working on breaking the other boots in for now and they seem to be improving. I've been lucky so far in that I've really not had to break in any hiking boots.

The first danger date for the White Mountains will be March 12th. Might be wise to avoid the Wilderness Trail either end of that day ;)

Bob

David Metsky
03-03-2005, 03:51 PM
Come to think of it, the REI customer was buying Scarpa T2s. Don't know if one oven can be used for both brands.
Both Scarpa and Garmont liner materials are supplied from the same manufacturer, IIRC. Either way, since you can heat mold either in your oven at home I don't think it matters much.

DougPaul
03-03-2005, 04:10 PM
Both Scarpa and Garmont liner materials are supplied from the same manufacturer, IIRC. Either way, since you can heat mold either in your oven at home I don't think it matters much.

Don't have any info on the heat moldable foam manufacturer. Could be the same or could be different foams from the same manufacturer. Or maybe just warantee stuff, ie "Warantee invalid if you don't use MY oven", etc.

There is a good chance that your conclusion is correct, however, it is worth a phone call to check, IMHO.

BTW, the REI salesman told the Scarpa customer that the liners were moldable 3 times. (Don't know what happens if you do it a fourth--perhaps they turn into pumpkins? :) )

Doug

HikerBob
03-06-2005, 09:57 PM
Well, I visited Wilderness House on Commonweath Ave in Boston and spent some time with a very knowledgeable young lady in the footwear department to see what could be done about my wide feet in the Alpina 1550's.

She suggested I try a footbed with more arch support as this would raise the foot and reduce the flattening of the foot under load. I had brought the boots with me so with footbeds replaced I stuck my foot in. Wow! Did that feel wrong. I was ready to take it right out, but she said I needed to give it a little time.

I put both boots on, laced up and went walkabout in the store, picking up a few other items on my rounds. Despite my reservations the footbeds did the trick. They still feel a little odd at first, and I had to mess with sock choice again today, but I no longer have the cramped across the width feeling and the boots fit better all round.

The big test will be next weekend. I'll report back.

Bob