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Nonlegit
03-27-2005, 02:04 PM
I was wondering if anyone had any information or background as to why logger boots are built the way they are. I was planning on getting a pair for some of the maintenance type work I do around here, but not really for hiking. Since i have been appyling for positions on wildland fire crews, i noticed that they require loggers. So, from that, i know that you CAN hike in them, and it certainly must not be TOO bad (they put in a LOT of hard miles). I have full grain leathers already, but i am interested in why loggers have high tops, have very thick soles and a very large heel (about 2 inches in chippewas...). I was just interested in the functionality of the boots, and whether anyone had them and what they thought of them.

spencer
03-28-2005, 06:35 AM
I've never worked on a fire crew, but I spend a lot of time in the woods of ME both for work and pleasure. I only wear my logger boots when absolutely necessary for many of the same reasons Schlimmer mentioned. OSHA regs change more often than a teenage girl going to the mall, so I'd check in with your supervisor before you buy anything.

Shortly after I bought my leather, thick-heeled, tall, steel-toed boots, the requirements changed so that I needed a full kevlar boot. I made the switch to a Husky rubber boots loaded with kevlar which passes every chainsaw safety test out there. They are more comfortable for chainsaw work and are much warmer in the winter. In the summer, they can be pretty hot and they don't offer quite as much support as the tall leathers.

Don't screw around with chainsaw chaps. They are more trouble than they are worth. Invest in a pair of summer-weight chainsaw pants and you won't regret it.

and by the way, regular logger boots (as opposed to fire dawgs) don't have those silly tassles on the toe :D

for what it's worth...

spencer

bruno
03-28-2005, 09:34 AM
dude i have a pair of white's boots for motorcycle ridin' cause they are bad***. way bad***. and i walk all over the place on hard surfaces where i work (i'm no cubicle monkey--i'm on my feet all day on concrete floors). they are THE most comfortable footwear i own. includin' my beloved limmers (which are a close second). if you measure your foot following the fairly elaborate white's measurement instructions, you will get the best boots of your life (they're expensive but way worth it). but make sure you get white's and NOT chippewas or any other ones. go to whitesboots.com and check 'em out. (i think that's the site anyway). and good luck gettin' on a fire crew!

Ned Kipperson
04-01-2005, 01:26 AM
I have always thought that fire boots were good for what wildland firefighting is, being on your feet for 14 hours, and walking a couple miles on unstable ground. The pronounced heel keeps your arches from flattening, and also helps with uphill and downhill climbing of dozer roads (not trails in the NE). The high, laceup design distributes the support from your heel up your calf. Sounds like I work for White's. Word of advice, wear them everyday and you'll get used to em.

The amount of hard miles depends on your "luck". Either you sit around waiting for assignment, you spend hours combing a 100 sq. ft. lot looking for hotspots, or you are cutting and chopping your butt off while pines are burning around you in a high wind. You might even have to run. But like Schlimmer says, it's a lot of standing around in the heat. It ain't hiking.

Chicken-fried steak for breakfast, mmm...obesity.

My advice to get on a fire crew is train yourself, and don't expect to get on a hotshot crew in Oregon your first year. Try Cape Cod Seashore.

RGF1
04-01-2005, 09:18 PM
I was wondering if anyone had any information or background as to why logger boots are built the way they are. I was planning on getting a pair for some of the maintenance type work I do around here, but not really for hiking. Since i have been appyling for positions on wildland fire crews, i noticed that they require loggers. So, from that, i know that you CAN hike in them, and it certainly must not be TOO bad (they put in a LOT of hard miles). I have full grain leathers already, but i am interested in why loggers have high tops, have very thick soles and a very large heel (about 2 inches in chippewas...). I was just interested in the functionality of the boots, and whether anyone had them and what they thought of them.
Too make it simple the boots loggers use are made to use climbing spikes on them so the logger can climb a tree and use a chainsaw in the tree. that is why they have such high tops . The Soles are made so the logger has lots of traction and does not slip as easily. They are not good for hiking in at all. . If you ar doing trail work get a sturdy pair of full grain leather boots . Limmers are expensives Other boot maakers are good and not as expensive Rachle (SP) has a few good models .
good luck with you Hot shots job. If not try a seasonal job with the NPS in a park that is not popular ot owrk in to get your foot in the door.