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View Full Version : Passaconaway Road closed: fire



Breeze
11-13-2016, 05:16 PM
Both MUR and Conway Daily Sun have more info.

Basically, there is a spreading brush fire in Albany NH, right now up to 100 acres.

http://www.wmur.com/article/crews-battle-brush-fire-in-albany-for-second-day/8284826

Be careful out there.

Snowflea
11-13-2016, 06:18 PM
Noticed this from Osceola summit this morning and called Conway fire department. Lots of smoke in the distance. Guy I spoke with said it was on/near Boulder Loop Trail and they had been fighting it since 4 pm Saturday. :confused:

JimC
11-13-2016, 07:42 PM
We flew over this fire about 4 PM SUN.
Took some great video and I would post it here if I could figure out how.
I have it as a video file (.mov) on my computer BUT VFTT is asking for a URL. I don't have a URL for it.
Help please.

David Metsky
11-14-2016, 07:54 AM
You can't post videos to our server. You'll need to find a place online to host the video and then post a link to that URL. The easiest is to upload the video to Youtube and post the link here.

JimC
11-15-2016, 08:59 AM
Thanks Dave.

Makes sense.

Guess I'll start by obtaining a YouTube acct.

JimC
11-15-2016, 11:51 AM
OK. Progress, I think.

https://youtu.be/pBF0e8XKumo

Let's see if this works.

Video taken flying E along the Kanc starting around the covered bridge. Flames are towards the end.

Jim

dug
11-15-2016, 12:35 PM
OK. Progress, I think.

https://youtu.be/pBF0e8XKumo

Let's see if this works.

Video taken flying E along the Kanc starting around the covered bridge. Flames are towards the end.

Jim

I can open it up fine. And, have to say, that's a bit larger than I was thinking it was. Scary.

David Metsky
11-15-2016, 12:43 PM
I can open it up fine. And, have to say, that's a bit larger than I was thinking it was. Scary.
Yeah, that's not small.

TJsName
11-15-2016, 01:16 PM
What is the open area right at the start of the video? I can't tell if it's ledge or slash.

sierra
11-15-2016, 01:26 PM
What is the open area right at the start of the video? I can't tell if it's ledge or slash.

Ledges know as Sundown ledge. I've done a lot of rock climbing in there in year's past. It's really a cool area, featuring horizontal roofs that are 20 to 30 ft long. We would go there to aid climb when it was raining and all the local cliffs where wet. In regards to the size of the fire, it's actually fairly small, it's just that we are not used to forest fires. If you've lived out west during the "fire season" as I have, you wouldn't be to impressed with this fire. Given the topography and the forecast for rain, I suspect this fire could be out by the weekend. Granted, you never know what a fire will do. Regardless, it is quite interesting to watch the land come back and a walk in there next spring and summer would be most interesting.

jniehof
11-15-2016, 01:30 PM
In regards to the size of the fire, it's actually fairly small, it's just that we are not used to forest fires. If you've lived out west during the "fire season" as I have
And I. Las Conchas burned 100 acres in less than two minutes.

dug
11-15-2016, 01:34 PM
If you've lived out west during the "fire season" as I have, you wouldn't be to impressed with this fire. Given the topography and the forecast for rain, I suspect this fire could be out by the weekend. Granted, you never know what a fire will do. Regardless, it is quite interesting to watch the land come back and a walk in there next spring and summer would be most interesting.

Yes, correct. I'm not comparing it to a fire out west, I'm comparing it to a fire in the WMNF.

sierra
11-15-2016, 01:48 PM
Yes, correct. I'm not comparing it to a fire out west, I'm comparing it to a fire in the WMNF.

Fair enough.

TJsName
11-15-2016, 02:00 PM
Ledges know as Sundown ledge. I've done a lot of rock climbing in there in year's past. It's really a cool area, featuring horizontal roofs that are 20 to 30 ft long. We would go there to aid climb when it was raining and all the local cliffs where wet.

Neato - it's one of those places I've yet to visit.


In regards to the size of the fire, it's actually fairly small, it's just that we are not used to forest fires. If you've lived out west during the "fire season" as I have, you wouldn't be to impressed with this fire. Given the topography and the forecast for rain, I suspect this fire could be out by the weekend. Granted, you never know what a fire will do. Regardless, it is quite interesting to watch the land come back and a walk in there next spring and summer would be most interesting.

Looks like it's just a brush fire mostly - eating away at the underbrush as opposed to whole trees going up. I suspect it would take a large confluence of factors for that to happen.

dug
11-15-2016, 02:01 PM
Fair enough.


Ha, didn't mean it that way. Just for me, close to home, haven't seen this before.

TJsName
11-15-2016, 02:59 PM
For some perspective, in 1903 over 80,000 acres burned, with 30,000 burned in the Kilkenny/Berlin fire. http://www.eeb.cornell.edu/goodale/2003Goodale%20Appalachiaver3.pdf

Eventually the logging died down and was better regulated though, so the burning of 350 acres (last estimate I heard for this fire) is large considering:

"During the last forty years [published in 2003 I believe], only 643 cumulative acres of the WMNF
have burned (Main & Haines 1974; T. Brady, USFS, pers. comm.
June 2003). This amounts to just 0.002 percent of the forest per year.
This reduction in fires is due largely to changes in forest harvest
practices and to advances in fire detection and suppression. Unlike in
the western U.S., where natural fires were common, fires in White
Mountain forests were rare. However, they did occur under the right
circumstances—when natural (hurricane) or human (heavy logging)
factors disturbed large patches of forest, and these patches coincided
with the right combination of weather and ignition sources.
Concerted efforts helped prevent similar combustion after the 1938
hurricane (Hale 1958), and future fires are possible should the right
combination of circumstances occur again. Furthermore, the unusual
burst of flames in the early 1900s was very important for the
formation of the national forest system and for determining many of
the characteristics of White Mountain forests today."

Rainman
11-15-2016, 03:04 PM
Looks like it's just a brush fire mostly - eating away at the underbrush as opposed to whole trees going up. I suspect it would take a large confluence of factors for that to happen.

Actually, it is surprising how quickly that can happen. As a firefighter I have seen small leaf and duff fires climb "ladder fuels" with little advanced warning. It is all about how dry things are.

Stan
11-16-2016, 08:21 AM
For some perspective, in 1903 over 80,000 acres burned, with 30,000 burned in the Kilkenny/Berlin fire. http://www.eeb.cornell.edu/goodale/2003Goodale%20Appalachiaver3.pdf

Eventually the logging died down and was better regulated though, so the burning of 350 acres (last estimate I heard for this fire) is large considering:

"During the last forty years [published in 2003 I believe], only 643 cumulative acres of the WMNF
have burned (Main & Haines 1974; T. Brady, USFS, pers. comm.
June 2003). This amounts to just 0.002 percent of the forest per year.
This reduction in fires is due largely to changes in forest harvest
practices and to advances in fire detection and suppression. Unlike in
the western U.S., where natural fires were common, fires in White
Mountain forests were rare. However, they did occur under the right
circumstances—when natural (hurricane) or human (heavy logging)
factors disturbed large patches of forest, and these patches coincided
with the right combination of weather and ignition sources.
Concerted efforts helped prevent similar combustion after the 1938
hurricane (Hale 1958), and future fires are possible should the right
combination of circumstances occur again. Furthermore, the unusual
burst of flames in the early 1900s was very important for the
formation of the national forest system and for determining many of
the characteristics of White Mountain forests today."

I disagree with the tone that logging is a cause of fires. Slash left behind is very much a cause of fires but good forestry management includes logging for the purpose of creating firebreaks and removing fuel for wildfires which cover large areas. I'm not surprised that there is a fire, earlier in the summer I expected there might be more, or more serious ones, with the drought causing such dry conditions. This will recover and it'll be a good wildlife observation spot as the forest starts the cycle all over again. Fire is quite a natural phenomenom and its been both controlled and exacerbated by man's presence but ... I'm grateful for the views rendered by some fire caused balds!

sierra
11-16-2016, 12:44 PM
I disagree with the tone that logging is a cause of fires. Slash left behind is very much a cause of fires but good forestry management includes logging for the purpose of creating firebreaks and removing fuel for wildfires which cover large areas. I'm not surprised that there is a fire, earlier in the summer I expected there might be more, or more serious ones, with the drought causing such dry conditions. This will recover and it'll be a good wildlife observation spot as the forest starts the cycle all over again. Fire is quite a natural phenomenom and its been both controlled and exacerbated by man's presence but ... I'm grateful for the views rendered by some fire caused balds!

I agree that recovering fire area's are an amazing place to visit. Not only to watch the stages of flora come back, but to observe wildlife. I walked through a burned area in CO ( Hayman Fire) and it was like a moonscape, even the dirt was burned to dust. Some time later, I walked it again and saw 2 deer munching on a grassy plant about 12 inches high, that was the only living flora I could see anywhere. It was a sobering picture of how wildlife starves as a result of fire. I've walked a lot of the controlled burns in Yosemite as well, all in various stages of comeback, just amazing to see. On a side note ( indulge me). Yosemite Rangers put out fires for many year's as soon as they started, to save the land. Later they where trying to figure out why no new Sequoia's were growing. Turns out, the cones need fire to "pop" the seeds. Then they lit the Sequoia groves in a controlled burn and boom, seedlings everywhere. Fire kills, but also provides fresh life as well.

DougPaul
11-16-2016, 01:25 PM
Yosemite Rangers put out fires for many year's as soon as they started, to save the land. Later they where trying to figure out why no new Sequoia's were growing. Turns out, the cones need fire to "pop" the seeds. Then they lit the Sequoia groves in a controlled burn and boom, seedlings everywhere. Fire kills, but also provides fresh life as well.
A number of plants depend on fire either for themselves and/or to suppress competitors. Periodic/occasional fires also help to maintain or are essential to maintain a variety of environments and habitats.

In the case of the sequoias, the mature trees are very fire resistant and frequent fires tend to stay down in the underbrush and clear it out (which gives the freshly released sequoia seeds and seedlings a head start). If the brush becomes overgrown the resulting hotter fire has a greater chance of burning and killing the intermediate and mature trees. Many living sequoias have fire scars around their bases. https://www.google.com/#q=sequoia+trees+and+fire

The very large 1988 forest fires in Yellowstone were very instructive. While they initially might have looked like a disaster, they left a mosaic of burned and unburned forest and many were surprised at the speed with which the burned areas recovered. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellowstone_fires_of_1988

Doug

peakbagger
11-16-2016, 03:13 PM
One of the somewhat infamous story's of the Zealand Valley fires related to JE Henrys logging practices attributed to leading scientific authorities of the time, was that the fire burned so hot that the soil was sterilized and that the woods would never recover.

There is pine barren ecosystem in the Ossipee area of NH that was in danger of being lost http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/newhampshire/places-preserves/ossipee-pine-barrens.xml because fires were intentionally suppressed. Now that's its recognized that fires are needed to keep the area healthy, there are prescribed burns. The WMNF has several areas that they burn every few years to keep appropriate habitat. Sadly I think with loss of budget a lot of these areas have been left to grow out. There used to be a several area path behind Camp Dodge that has been allowed to grow in.

I would take my chances on a fire compared to the long term damage that the ice storm of 1998 wrought on the area.

ChrisB
11-18-2016, 07:28 AM
Drove through the covered bridge and the length of the Dugway Road yesterday (Thursday).

Lots of fire-fighting trucks in the Boulder Loop parking lot and the woods along the north side of the road were posted closed. But road was open and looked like crew was deep in woods putting out hot spots.

cb