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View Full Version : This Rescue is REALLY Pathetic...



ChrisB
01-17-2017, 12:54 PM
I had to READ THIS (http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/20170116/fish-and-game-assists-unprepared-hiker-in-white-mountains) twice to make sure I got it.

Two questions:

* What are friends for?
* Should there be a multiple choice test at all major trail heads?

1. Are you an idiot? (Y, N, Sometimes, Not sure)
2. Is it getting dark? (Y, N, Maybe)
3. Are your sneakers waterproof? (Y, N, Toes only)
4. Are you easy to carry? (Usually, Not when wet, Why?)
5. Can you pay for a rescue if needed? (N, I have to pay?", They''ll never take me alive!)

Snowflea
01-17-2017, 01:17 PM
The plot thickens...

http://www.newenglandtrailconditions.com/nh/viewreport.php?entryid=29320

Grey J
01-17-2017, 01:58 PM
Q. "Are you easy to carry?" A. "Not when wet."
Well done ChrisB. It's actually easier if you are frozen stiff.
Nice view if you can slog that 1.8 miles.
5753

DayTrip
01-17-2017, 02:08 PM
What's next? Calling for rescue from the trail head when you forget which way to get back on the highway as the sun sets?

Raven
01-17-2017, 02:12 PM
The plot thickens...

http://www.newenglandtrailconditions.com/nh/viewreport.php?entryid=29320

Interesting.

Two people carrying out an injured hiker is Herculean. Usually 20 or more reserved for that!

skiguy
01-17-2017, 02:18 PM
Well done ChrisB. It's actually easier if you are frozen stiff.

5753

Not if you were sitting up. IF your going to get be frozen stiff please lie down flat before hand. much easier to slip you into the body bag and still draw the zipper.

sierra
01-17-2017, 03:34 PM
Mt. Pemigewasset, also know to locals as " The Savage Mountain". Standing at a lung busting 2,557 ft. above see level. It's seemingly tranquil start, lulls unsuspecting hikers to it's deadly clifftop. Constantly battered with intense winter storms, that will wear you down to near death in minutes. Beware and be prepared or the Indian will rear it's ugly head and get you!!!:eek:

Mike P.
01-22-2017, 08:28 AM
Interesting, not that the unprepared go out, we all know that they do, usually without serious consequence but if there is no snow in NYC, CT, RI and Boston, there is only an inch or two in the Whites. :D

Surprising that SAR took so long to reach a popular trailhead. Just throwing questions out there, did they think it was so easy a self rescue was probable? Were they busy elsewhere? How much lead time do they need? Thinking that if you need a rescue, say assume you fall and seriously injury a leg, how long do you need to stay still and wait for rescue once you call or activate your beacon? Believe one of us had to wait quite some time on the Livermore trail......

DougPaul
01-22-2017, 12:23 PM
Surprising that SAR took so long to reach a popular trailhead. Just throwing questions out there, did they think it was so easy a self rescue was probable? Were they busy elsewhere? How much lead time do they need? Thinking that if you need a rescue, say assume you fall and seriously injury a leg, how long do you need to stay still and wait for rescue once you call or activate your beacon? Believe one of us had to wait quite some time on the Livermore trail......
If you are referring to my accident (broken leg while XC skiing on the Livermore Tr):
* Livermore trail connects to the commercial Waterville Valley XC area, so rescue equipment (snowmobile, sled, and leg brace) was close at hand. The trail is actually a logging/fire road all the way past the accident site (usually) easily traveled by a snowmobile.
* My call went in while the XC area was open, so rescue personnel were on duty. (The on-site responders were a ski patroller and state(?) policeman. One or two more, a backup snowmobile, and an ambulance were at the trailhead when I arrived.)
* There were one or two large blowdowns (tree trunks) blocking Livermore Tr that they had to get around.
* I was able to tell them where I was, my injuries, and what they needed to bring.

They arrived on scene 1.5-2 hours after I made the call to 911. IMO, this was really fast, rather than quite some time...

Doug

Mike P.
01-22-2017, 08:45 PM
Thanks DougPaul, it is quick for a reply out on the trail. Thinking the unprepared would not have the gear to sit for 90 to 120 minutes after calling in. I good call to SAR made the searching part pretty short too.

They do great work, just thinking the unprepared are thinking rescues work on the same time frame as they do in their neighborhood.

Thanks for sharing

KPMMBM
01-23-2017, 06:36 AM
from the article-

Hikers are typically responsible for the cost of rescues unless they hold a Hike Safe card.

so I can head out in jeans and sneakers and as long as I have my card, I don't have to worry about paying for a potential rescue?

I didn't think the card covered negligence?

peakbagger
01-23-2017, 08:48 AM
I thought the hike safe card covered negligence but not reckless actions.?

So were the hikers in this rescue negligent or reckless? To the readership of the board I expect we may agree reckless but for the general public at large I expect negligent. I don't think fish and game has been challenged in court enough to really see where the definitions are established.

Mike P.
01-23-2017, 09:17 AM
Until the reckless are well represented to contest on their behalf, the definitions are not likely to be contested. I suspect in cases where they may be legally represented, we likely will continue to see closed settlements.