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View Full Version : Woman climbs tree to escape coyotes - Near Boston!



Tom Rankin
05-18-2018, 12:16 PM
This happened near Saugus, MA

"A woman hiking on a Massachusetts reservation says coyotes surrounded her and her dog, forcing her to climb a tree to safety."

Full article: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/05/15/woman-climbs-tree-to-escape-coyotes-at-reservation.html

JoshandBaron
05-18-2018, 01:21 PM
This happened near Saugus, MA

"A woman hiking on a Massachusetts reservation says coyotes surrounded her and her dog, forcing her to climb a tree to safety."

Full article: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/05/15/woman-climbs-tree-to-escape-coyotes-at-reservation.html

Friendly yearly reminder that it's pup season so they are more actively hunting day and night.

She only saw a single coyote that was 400 feet away but she is convinced there was a pack surrounding her? Coyotes don't hunt in packs and 400 feet isn't exactly a threat. Fox News strikes again.

nartreb
05-18-2018, 03:36 PM
How do you even see 400 feet in Breakheart reservation, other than in winter? Was the coyote on the opposite side of the pond? Or somebody typed an extra "0" after "40"?

That she saw it at all is a sign they're getting bolder. I saw one crossing my street yesterday around noon, carrying off a woodchuck. Given that we have a dog about the size of a woodchuck, I'll be extra cautious about letting her out until the fence is fully repaired.

skiguy
05-18-2018, 04:06 PM
Or was it a Coywolf? https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Sd18fLEf_Cw

richard
05-18-2018, 05:19 PM
The news of what the woman reported to police was accurate. She said 400 feet !

Tom Rankin
05-19-2018, 07:59 AM
Friendly yearly reminder that it's pup season so they are more actively hunting day and night.

She only saw a single coyote that was 400 feet away but she is convinced there was a pack surrounding her? Coyotes don't hunt in packs and 400 feet isn't exactly a threat. Fox News strikes again.From http://www.coyotesmarts.org/coyotes101/ "Coyotes normally hunt alone or in pairs and rarely as a pack, unless the prey is a deer or other large animal." Like a Human? :D

Grey J
05-19-2018, 09:45 AM
And the coyote responded, "Fake news, witch hunt."

richard
05-19-2018, 01:24 PM
And the coyote responded, "Fake news, witch hunt."
The coyote must be paying attention . Obviously well informed.

sierra
05-19-2018, 02:06 PM
The coyote was later spotted unpacking a crate with ACME stamped on the side. Rumors he pulled out a catapult and dynamite remained unconfirmed.:eek:

DougPaul
05-19-2018, 08:22 PM
Coyotes don't hunt in packs and 400 feet isn't exactly a threat. Fox News strikes again.
Actually, coyotes do (at least occasionally) hunt in packs. For instance, they have been observed hunting deer in packs. In the absence of wolves (exterminated by humans) they have been getting bigger and moving into the vacant niche.

They have also been reported to be interbreeding with wolves in/from SE Canada.

Doug

Raven
05-20-2018, 05:43 AM
Curious. When is the last confirmed fatal attack of an adult human by a coyote in the US? I recall a young child in the 80's.

Not to make light, but to maintain perspective, I highly recommend checking for ticks and cutting back on sugar and processed foods.

TCD
05-20-2018, 11:17 AM
Fox News strikes again.

Not sure what this means, other than a political comment that doesn't belong here. We can quibble about the thought processes of the person involved, but it looks like the news outlet reported what she said happened.


Curious. When is the last confirmed fatal attack of an adult human by a coyote in the US? I recall a young child in the 80's.

Not to make light, but to maintain perspective, I highly recommend checking for ticks and cutting back on sugar and processed foods.

I think the last fatal attack was the one in Maine in 2009.

And I agree, there are more important dangers to mitigate. Wear seat belts and stop smoking are a couple more on that list.

jfb
05-20-2018, 11:59 AM
http://wnyt.com/news/coyote-attack-victim-fort-edward-washington-county/4578441/

DougPaul
05-20-2018, 12:01 PM
Curious. When is the last confirmed fatal attack of an adult human by a coyote in the US? I recall a young child in the 80's.
There was a fatal attack in Nova Scotia in 2009: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/coyotes-kill-toronto-singer-in-cape-breton-1.779304 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_Mitchell. According to the second reference, this is the only known fatal coyote attack in Canada.

Such attacks are very rare, however, coyotes are living among humans and becoming habituated. As with bears, they probably become more dangerous once they lose their fear of humans. (Coyotes are very adaptable and populations have been expanding since wolves have been eliminated from many areas.) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coyote_attacks_on_humans

In the incident near Boston, the coyote was likely more interested in the dog rather than the human. (She climbed the tree, leaving her dog on the ground according to a TV news report...) Most humans have little training in how to react to a coyote and she may have overreacted. The incident was certainly [over?] hyped in the local news media. (Not just by Fox...)

The 1981 death of a 3-year old is reported in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coyote_attacks_on_humans#Fatal_attacks

Co-Existing with Coyotes https://www.mspca.org/animal_protection/co-existing-with-coyotes/


Doug

Grey J
05-20-2018, 01:21 PM
Of course, there was this well known case in Australia, made famous by the line in a subsequent movie, "A dingo ate my baby" involving the failure of many to believe the story of a young mother, Lindy Chamberlain, that her baby was taken by a dingo. And a dingo is kind of like a coyote with an Aussie accent.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Azaria_Chamberlain

CaptCaper
05-20-2018, 04:48 PM
Crazy story.. full of holes.. WHDH-TV reports the woman was with her Labrador at Breakheart Reservation in Saugus on Tuesday when they encountered coyotes and she fled up a tree. Encountered is the key.. and staring only at the dog..

Seems to me that women is a Prima Donna so to speak ..and exaggerating what really when down or probably imagined she was in a attack situation.

TCD
05-20-2018, 06:08 PM
There was a fatal attack in Nova Scotia in 2009: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/coyotes-kill-toronto-singer-in-cape-breton-1.779304 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_Mitchell.


Yes, the Taylor Mitchell incident was the one I was remembering, I just mistakenly had it Maine rather than NS.

JoshandBaron
05-21-2018, 09:19 AM
Or was it a Coywolf? https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Sd18fLEf_Cw

All coyotes around here are "coywolfs." Just another name for the Eastern Coyote. They bred with dogs and wolves on their way over here.

She probably walked near a den full of pups and the mother was running interference.

peakbagger
05-21-2018, 09:22 AM
A bit of an aside, but have met two folks who have elected to climb trees to avoid moose during the rut.

TJsName
05-21-2018, 10:17 AM
A bit of an aside, but have met two folks who have elected to climb trees to avoid moose during the rut.

I used to climb trees to get away from people, and those things are super dangerous.

dug
05-21-2018, 11:01 AM
Friendly yearly reminder that it's pup season so they are more actively hunting day and night.

She only saw a single coyote that was 400 feet away but she is convinced there was a pack surrounding her? Coyotes don't hunt in packs and 400 feet isn't exactly a threat. Fox News strikes again.

I read if first in the Boston Globe. Does that make the story OK?

We used to have coyotes come into our yard often. Always a pack of 5-8 of them at any time. If they weren't hunting, were they just hanging out together?

JoshandBaron
05-21-2018, 01:08 PM
I read if first in the Boston Globe. Does that make the story OK?

If they weren't hunting, were they just hanging out together?

Sensationalizing normal everyday things is their MO. There really is nothing to see here.

I should say they *rarely* hunt in packs. The norm is for them to hunt by themselves or in pairs, especially in developed areas where there are other sources of food readily available for far less effort. You'll see them come together to defend territory from other packs.

Tom_Murphy
05-21-2018, 01:45 PM
I used to climb trees to get away from people, and those things are super dangerous.

Hahahaha, I was on a bushwhack to the Whitewall summit a few summers ago and heard other people talking. My first instinct was to hide.

It was a surreal moment. Intellectually I knew these were fellow bushwhackers who I would, most likely, enjoy meeting but the impulse to avoid them was overpowering.

skiguy
05-21-2018, 01:46 PM
All coyotes around here are "coywolfs." Just another name for the Eastern Coyote. They bred with dogs and wolves on their way over here.

.

Well put. This author supports what your saying. http://scitechconnect.elsevier.com/eastern-coyotes-hybrids-coywolf/

dug
05-21-2018, 01:55 PM
Sensationalizing normal everyday things is their MO. There really is nothing to see here.

I should say they *rarely* hunt in packs. The norm is for them to hunt by themselves or in pairs, especially in developed areas where there are other sources of food readily available for far less effort. You'll see them come together to defend territory from other packs.

Who, the Globe? They generated the story originally. Maybe the local news channel.

I don't claim to know what the coyotes that were always coming through my yard were doing. Just that there was a "gang" of them. The sounds I'd hear at night were pretty frightening, along with the gnawed on bones I'd find later.

JoshandBaron
05-21-2018, 03:12 PM
Who, the Globe? They generated the story originally. Maybe the local news channel.



I didn't read the globe story. Was referring to the Fox story in the OP saying the coyote(s) "forced" her up a tree... from 400 feet away.

dug
05-21-2018, 03:52 PM
I didn't read the globe story. Was referring to the Fox story in the OP saying the coyote(s) "forced" her up a tree... from 400 feet away.

Right. The original stories, like much of the national news media, were taken from local sources. So, I assume you have an issue with the original news source then?

richard
05-21-2018, 04:19 PM
I didn't read the globe story. Was referring to the Fox story in the OP saying the coyote(s) "forced" her up a tree... from 400 feet away.

It didnít say that. It said that she was surrounded and then climbed up a tree. Typical misinterpretation. I feel they generally get it right.

JoshandBaron
05-21-2018, 04:23 PM
Right. The original stories, like much of the national news media, were taken from local sources. So, I assume you have an issue with the original news source then?

I suppose I do? The media blowing up this subject specifically always rubs me the wrong way. It's always a big bad wolf, run and hide, what about the children analysis. In reality this woman probably walked by an active den during pup season with her off leash dog. People should obviously be aware that coyotes are out there but the fear mongering is absurd. This woman probably reacted the way she did because of the way the media portrays these animals.

JoshandBaron
05-21-2018, 04:25 PM
It didn’t say that. It said that she was surrounded and then climbed up a tree. Typical misinterpretation. I feel they generally get it right.

First line of the article: "A woman hiking on a Massachusetts reservation says coyotes surrounded her and her dog, forcing her to climb a tree to safety."

richard
05-21-2018, 04:44 PM
Exactly. And 1 (one) of them was 400 ft. Away.

JoshandBaron
05-21-2018, 05:05 PM
She only saw one.

richard
05-21-2018, 05:24 PM
She only saw one.
SAUGUS, Mass. – A woman hiking on a Massachusetts reservation says coyotes surrounded her and her dog, forcing her to climb a tree to safety. Coyotes, plural. Typical “spin”. Make it seem different than what it is.

TCD
05-21-2018, 05:33 PM
...A woman hiking on a Massachusetts reservation says...

Maybe this is in fact what she said. I wasn't there; I'm not going to pretend to know.

TJsName
05-21-2018, 06:21 PM
I feel they generally get it right.

When it's one's job to report the truth, a higher standard should be expected.

David Metsky
05-22-2018, 08:49 AM
Mod Note
I don't think nitpicking the details of the wording of the news reports is adding anything to the discussion here. Please drop that part of the conversation.

skiguy
05-22-2018, 10:56 AM
Perhaps it’s a matter of perception for this women. Wether the press is sensationalizing this event or not maybe it’s just a case of being in a more urban area. Who knows what her prior experiences are. Has she been on Safari or climbed 8000 meter peaks and seen yetis and what not before. It’s entirely possible she is only a suburban citizen that has limited outdoor experience along with very little exposure to wild animals. Therefore maybe she reacted in a way she thought appropriate based upon her prior experiences.

griffin
05-22-2018, 11:34 AM
It’s entirely possible she is only a suburban citizen that has limited outdoor experience along with very little exposure to wild animals. Therefore maybe she reacted in a way she thought appropriate based upon her prior experiences.

This. The first time my dog and I encountered a coyote in the Middlesex Fells, I had no idea that so many of them lived in the area, had no expectation or running into one in what I felt to be a fairly urbanized setting, and certainly no idea of how worried to be or what to do. Had it not run away from us, chances are good that my initial response might...not have been optimal.

JoshandBaron
05-22-2018, 11:49 AM
http://http://nhpr.org/post/something-wild-why-coyotes-seem-be-everywhere-2#stream/0 (http://nhpr.org/post/something-wild-why-coyotes-seem-be-everywhere-2#stream/0)

"To be fair the fear and anger directed coyotes also comes from the documented attacks on domestic pets. The fact is that coyotes feed on small mammals, and as generalists that sometimes means domestic cats and dogs. Schadler says the best thing we can do for coyotes is educate them. And the best time to educate them is mid- to late-May as the juveniles are emerging from their dens. “They are naÔve; they will wander up people's driveways and into people's backyards and try to play with people's dogs, kids, cats. People should haze them by chasing them being loud and making it uncomfortable for those coyotes to be anywhere near their backyard.” This will condition the coyotes to fear humans and steer well clear of us."

Barkingcat
05-23-2018, 08:24 AM
http://http://nhpr.org/post/something-wild-why-coyotes-seem-be-everywhere-2#stream/0 (http://nhpr.org/post/something-wild-why-coyotes-seem-be-everywhere-2#stream/0)

Thanks for this -- this is the most interesting aspect of this entire thread.

This information is further reinforced in an article (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2018/05/22/heres-why-there-are-so-many-coyotes-and-why-they-are-spreading-so-fast/) in today's edition of the Washington Post. The article examines the rapid spread of coyotes across this country and into other parts of the continent. Fascinating stuff.

Ramblings
05-23-2018, 12:25 PM
I encountered a coyote last fall at the Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge. When it crossed my path, I was initially annoyed that someone let their dog off leash and it slipped silently into the shrubbery before I realized that it was actually a coyote. Evidently there is an established year-round population: https://mountauburn.org/coyotes-at-mount-auburn/

Tom_Murphy
05-23-2018, 02:46 PM
Thanks for this -- this is the most interesting aspect of this entire thread.

This information is further reinforced in an article (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2018/05/22/heres-why-there-are-so-many-coyotes-and-why-they-are-spreading-so-fast/) in today's edition of the Washington Post. The article examines the rapid spread of coyotes across this country and into other parts of the continent. Fascinating stuff.

So the story of coyote migration is also the story of the loss of the wolf.

Apex Predators

I have read a wonderful mixed media web article on the impact of the return of apex predators to Yellowstone NP. I think it was in National Geographic.

I found these link just now but never is the article I remember reading.

https://blog.nationalgeographic.org/2014/02/16/this-will-shatter-your-view-of-apex-predators-how-wolves-change-rivers/

https://nemessica.tintagel.pl/apexblog/2018/01/29/Yellowstone-wolves-the-apex-predators-perspective/

weatherman
05-23-2018, 03:16 PM
"To be fair the fear and anger directed coyotes also comes from the documented attacks on domestic pets. The fact is that coyotes feed on small mammals, and as generalists that sometimes means domestic cats and dogs. Schadler says the best thing we can do for coyotes is educate them. And the best time to educate them is mid- to late-May as the juveniles are emerging from their dens. “They are naÔve; they will wander up people's driveways and into people's backyards and try to play with people's dogs, kids, cats. People should haze them by chasing them being loud and making it uncomfortable for those coyotes to be anywhere near their backyard.” This will condition the coyotes to fear humans and steer well clear of us."


This is a great passage. We coexist with smaller (Western) coyotes all the time IMBY. My rule is if they're in my neighborhood, I make it uncomfortable for them, and when I'm in their neighborhood (open space), I watch from a distance/ignore unless they get too close. Seems to work fine. Looking big and making it very clear that my dogs are NOT their lunch helps. I have two dogs I can pick up if need be, and a third that is twice the size of a coyote and makes them run away just by glancing in their direction.

And the author of the NHPR article describes something I've seen them do several times before: cross streets in crosswalks, at green lights. No kidding. I saw one last November wait for a green, cross, wait at the corner for the light to turn green the perpendicular way, then cross again. If I hadn't had others in the car NOBODY would have believed me. Crazy.

JoshandBaron
05-23-2018, 03:30 PM
"To be fair the fear and anger directed coyotes also comes from the documented attacks on domestic pets. The fact is that coyotes feed on small mammals, and as generalists that sometimes means domestic cats and dogs. Schadler says the best thing we can do for coyotes is educate them. And the best time to educate them is mid- to late-May as the juveniles are emerging from their dens. “They are naÔve; they will wander up people's driveways and into people's backyards and try to play with people's dogs, kids, cats. People should haze them by chasing them being loud and making it uncomfortable for those coyotes to be anywhere near their backyard.” This will condition the coyotes to fear humans and steer well clear of us."


This is a great passage. We coexist with smaller (Western) coyotes all the time IMBY. My rule is if they're in my neighborhood, I make it uncomfortable for them, and when I'm in their neighborhood (open space), I watch from a distance/ignore unless they get too close. Seems to work fine. Looking big and making it very clear that my dogs are NOT their lunch helps. I have two dogs I can pick up if need be, and a third that is twice the size of a coyote and makes them run away just by glancing in their direction.

I do the same thing. I've chased them naked through the backyard as they tried to engage one of the dogs and admired them in the middle of a Pemi bushwhack. My cattle dog hates them and will start growling if he so much as smells one.

Snowflea
05-23-2018, 06:51 PM
And the author of the NHPR article describes something I've seen them do several times before: cross streets in crosswalks, at green lights. No kidding. I saw one last November wait for a green, cross, wait at the corner for the light to turn green the perpendicular way, then cross again. If I hadn't had others in the car NOBODY would have believed me. Crazy.

One could argue that coyotes are smarter and/or more considerate than many humans then. :rolleyes:

TCD
06-10-2018, 09:58 PM
Bump.

New coyote incident from near Boston.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/06/10/coyote-attacks-teenager-in-massachusetts-report.html