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jjo
06-13-2005, 11:30 AM
Planning my next hiking trip to the "whites"in a few months. Last week while training on a short day hike here in N. Illinois, my yellow lab and I encountered a Coyote in a very much "stalking" mode. He continued to go back and forth and draw closer as I held him @ bay with a 2" log I stumbled on. He was persistant and I finally had to leave my dog and pursue him w the log which made him retreat for about 15 sec. As we headed back toward the car, he continue to stalk us showing up at different points on the trail. My 85 lb lab is very docile (typical of the breed). I continued to make noise w the log and all finally ended OK as we arrived at the car. I reported to the Park service and they stated he was probably about 45-50 Lbs and only curious.(rrright..)We have had many several serious coyote attacks in this area (generally small to large animals) and they usually act as a pack...
What's your take on coyote danger? (anywhere)
Are there any in the whites??
It scared me a bit and alerted to me the bigger danger of a pack acting as a group. They appear to be fearless and relentless as well as mangy, ugly. My small knife and log probably would have been no match for a "pack". Love to hear your thoughts...

dms
06-13-2005, 11:57 AM
I had a similar encounter in the woods behind my house in southern NH recently. What was so unnerving is that the coyote basically showed no fear at all and kept following me for about 1/4 of a mile, staying too close for comfort for me. I turned around and took a different trail back, and he seemed to lose interest. I went back out there a few times since but have not seen him. Thankfully!

sp1936
06-13-2005, 12:03 PM
There are coyotes in the Whites. Local residents witnessed a pack take down a deer in Intervale this past winter.

They seem to be just about everywhere. I have heard of coyote sightings in NY city. I'm skeptical, but the source is an NYPD lieutenant who hunts frequently in upstate NY and knows a coyote when he sees one.

I do not believe that humans need to fear coyote. Watch out for your cat, though.

Steve

woodstrider
06-13-2005, 12:15 PM
jjo - sounds very scary. Maybe it was an animal in bad shape, and was looking for an easy meal (your dog). I hope that the log was 2" in diameter and not in length
all the coyotes that I ever have seen have always been very fearful and ran off. But then I do not hike with a dog. This incident is a good argument for why dogs should always be kept on a leash. I am sure that the coyote would have made short work of your dog if you had not been there to protect him.

I still always say that I feel safe in the woods form the 4-legged animals. But the most dangerous ( read destructive) that I have encountered would be those mice. Two tents with holes chewed in them. And don't get me started on leantos

Tom Rankin
06-13-2005, 12:23 PM
I have heard of coyote sightings in NY city.

It was on the local news a few years ago, and it sure looked like a coyote. It was living in a cemetery. There are a lot of places within the city limits of New York that are not entirely 'urban', e.g. Central park, a lot of Staten Island, Jamaica Bay, some parts of Bronx, etc.

brianW
06-13-2005, 12:30 PM
I can think of two possible reasons why the coyote was so interested in you and your lab. Most likely your lab

1. coyote viewed your dog as possible competition

or

2. your dog was in heat (?)

Orphic Seth
06-13-2005, 12:35 PM
I would not worry about the coyote. They're fearless, pretty much, as in they just don't give a darn. I operate incredibly loud, heavy, machinery that travels at very high speeds, and they'll just sit there watching me coming towards them before moving at the very last moment. Funny stuff.

They are, quite frankly, incredible creatures, filling a valuable predator niche that has been void for quite some time, and adapting quickly to new environments, such as suburban and urban scapes. They work solo, or in packs, and they'll do what they have to do to eat. As mentioned, watch your pets, but I wouldn't worry about yourself-- unless it has rabies or something, obviously. Enjoy the experience.

jjo
06-13-2005, 12:39 PM
I can think of two possible reasons why the coyote was so interested in you and your lab. Most likely your lab

1. coyote viewed your dog as possible competition

or

2. your dog was in heat (?)

My dog is 2 yr old male yellow lab (neutered). He showed no fear and probably viewed the coyote as a new "playmate" The coyote to me was fearless and wanted ( I think) an easy meal. I shudder to think of encountering a pack. Maybe I need a bigger knife AND club. Yes it was 2" diameter and about 6 ft long. Maybe sharp tipped treking poles would help...

NH_Mtn_Hiker
06-13-2005, 12:40 PM
Coyotes have been known to use a female in heat to lure a dog to the pack. :eek:

Oh, by the way...Pepper spray works well on coyotes. :)

Chip
06-13-2005, 12:42 PM
They should be nocturnal, so one that "interested" during the day is sick, hungry or both.
They hunt in packs and are known to "bait" dogs into chasing one coyote right into the pack. Bad news for your dog. I suppose if your Lab is a female the coyote may have been following less deadly instincts, but not likely.
Coyotes that look matted are suffering from mange which can kill a dog and severly scar people. You probably should have stayed with your dog, as there was most likely other coyotes in the area. Coyote are everywhere. Most states have no real closed seasons or "bag" limits on coyote which indicates they have reached population levels where they may lose their protected "game" status all-together and be treated as any pest is.

Chip
06-13-2005, 12:53 PM
I would not worry about the coyote. Enjoy the experience.

Obviously I disagree with Seth. It's disturbing enough being trailed by a healthy domestic dog with unknown intent with yours on a leash.
There is nothing enjoyable about being followed by a wild dog with questionable intent. Adding in the possible exposure to rabies or mange for you and the dog, the best course is to remove yourself from the area ASAP.

lumberzac
06-13-2005, 12:55 PM
They should be nocturnal, so one that "interested" during the day is sick, hungry or both.
They hunt in packs and are known to "bait" dogs into chasing one coyote right into the pack. Bad news for your dog. I suppose if your Lab is a female the coyote may have been following less deadly instincts, but not likely.
Coyotes that look matted are suffering from mange which can kill a dog and severly scar people. You probably should have stayed with your dog, as there was most likely other coyotes in the area. Coyote are everywhere. Most states have no real closed seasons or "bag" limits on coyote which indicates they have reached population levels where they may lose their protected "game" status all-together and be treated as any pest is.

I don’t think coyotes are truly nocturnal. Probably about 80% of my encounters with coyotes have been during the daylight hours. Most of these animals looked and acted healthy.

Chip
06-13-2005, 01:03 PM
"Habitat and Habits
The coyote is a nocturnal animal, active during the nighttime hours. However, when it is less threatened by man, it will hunt and move from place to place during the day. The coyote will hunt in unrelated (non-family) pairs or large groups, in search of small mammals including shrews, voles, and rabbits."

Okay; nocturnal by nature, but when sick, hungry or less threatened, will hunt during the day.

roadtripper
06-13-2005, 01:24 PM
I saw one cross a street and walk along a sidewalk for about 50 feet in downtown Providence, RI about a month ago. It was about a 1/4 mile north of the Providence Place Mall. I was only about 25 feet from it at one point and it didn't seem to care at all. Kinda scary....

lumberzac
06-13-2005, 01:25 PM
Here’s a good article from The Conservationist, by New York State DEC on Eastern Coyotes.
http://www.dec.state.ny.us/website/dpae/cons/coyote.PDF

WhiteMTHike
06-13-2005, 02:12 PM
I saw one cross a street and walk along a sidewalk for about 50 feet in downtown Providence, RI about a month ago. It was about a 1/4 mile north of the Providence Place Mall. I was only about 25 feet from it at one point and it didn't seem to care at all. Kinda scary....

Lots of coyotes here in R.I. I've got some that pretty much dwell just off my property line behind my backyard. On occasion I'll see one during the day but I do hear them at night especially this time of year. That's why the guy in my avatar stays in the house, no matter how much he meows to go out.

I work not too far from the Providence Place Mall. I'll keep my eyes open if walking in that area.

HikerBob
06-13-2005, 02:32 PM
The Cabot Contingent of the VFTT Winter Gathering experienced Coyote (we assumed) howling after dark on our infamous trek back in January. Can't speak for the others, but I was damn glad to have had company!

Bob

ripple
06-13-2005, 03:59 PM
Coyotes are every where here in Ct. I have had them in my backyard. They do eat cats that are outside sometimes, but haven't bothered people. There are so many here in Ct, I believe there is an open hunting season on them. I have seen many at my place in southern NH. Everytime I have come across one in NH, it has taken off. That would make me somewhat nervous haveing one follow me. I still would not view a coyote as a threat to an adult.

NewHampshire
06-13-2005, 04:59 PM
Coyote are creatures of opportunity and will hunt whenever there is a meal...period. Ive hunted song dogs, and killed em during the day. Not a sick, scraggly dog either. If they hear food, then it dont matter how high or low the sun is. As a matter of fact your likely to see lots of dawn and sunset activity as that is the general time of many of their prey animals movements. The problem is that the coyote is a very adaptable and aggressive creature. Thier only major natural competition (wolf) was basically exterminated by man. This is why they have managed to become the most prolific wild dog in all of North America. Generaly they tend not to be a pack animal (except for when birtyhing and caring for pups as they grow to adulthood.) As a whole I wouldnt worry about them too much. Just be aware that they are a possibly encounterable threat, just like a bear or moose. If you are worried enough to want to carry protection then a good, stout, fixed blade sheath knife is your best bet. But Id bet the knife offers more psychological comfort than it would ever be needed. Your most likely to have problems with coyotes living close to cities, suburbs and other heavily populated areas. The Fish and Game from time to time contemplates placing bounties on them and even recently a summer night hunting season was considered. For now they remain huntable (with proper lic.) year round with no daily or yearly limits. There is also a winter night season.
Brian

DougPaul
06-13-2005, 06:07 PM
Generaly they tend not to be a pack animal
After hearing some other reports of pack behavior (pack hunting of deer), I asked a wildlife biologist about same. He said that coyotes have been moving into the vacant wolf niche--including pack behaviors.

Doug

NewHampshire
06-13-2005, 06:26 PM
Indeed it is true they can and will pack up. If it becomes painfuly clear to them that their survival means taking down full grown healthy animals like deer they will pack up and hunt as one. But they tend to be lonsome animals (or at the very least they stay with their mate and pups) under normal circumstances. As a matter of fact when they ARE birthing and nursing they become VERY aggressive about their trrotiry and will defend it to the death from other coyotes. But for the most part pack behavior tends to be on the rare side.
Brian

Gris
06-13-2005, 08:20 PM
At about 3 a.m. in the dead dread cold of winter i saw a HUGE coyote cross Rt. 302 in the vicinity of Zealand road about three winters ago, at least 60 lbs... :eek:

VFTTop'r
06-13-2005, 09:08 PM
Many say they would not attack an adult. What about kids though?

Dugan
06-13-2005, 10:13 PM
Coyote or coy-dog, either way sounds like a scary experience. I live in an area where I hear coyotes nearly every night but I've never experienced anything close to the situation you describe. Although I've heard of coyote sightings in the Whites, I have never seen or heard one there. I don't know if the difference could be attributable to dog breeds. I've owned livestock guardian dogs (Great Pyrenees and Kuvaszok), both of which are bred to guard livestock against predators like coyotes.

Without having been there, I would second staying close to your dog, and putting on a dominant/aggressive display toward the coyote, while also keeping a close eye for flanking maneuvers in case others are present.

As for a coyote bitch in season - my last Pyr was an intact male. Our first few years living here we'd find a coyote bitch, presumably in season, lurking in our back yard for a couple of weeks every fall. Can't say whether her motive was to lure him to a pack, or merely to breed.

It's true they are not always solitary. Last fall I listened to a pack of coyotes hunting what I believe was a deer and fawn. I've also seen them acting as a pack to get to a sheep flock.

Peakbagr
06-13-2005, 10:15 PM
I had a large, and obviously healthy coyote run past me, midmorning, about 5' away, on the trail of a wounded deer someone else had shot.
Out running near my home another time. Large coyote ran right across the road near me, about 4pm.
They don't need to be sick to be out in daylight.

Double Bow
06-14-2005, 10:05 AM
On the theme of wild dogs...

Has anyone ever had a fox act in a threatening manner toward them or their pet?

Last October we climbed Washington and after coming down the Jewell trail to the parking lot (it was dusk) we saw a pair of foxes. They were obviously looking for handouts and weren't too afraid to get close to humans. They would slowly take a step or two toward a person or group and when they clapped or shouted or stamped their feet, the fox would retreat a little but, wouldn't leave the lot. While nothing happened, I would have been nervous if we had had our dog with us.

sapblatt
06-14-2005, 10:13 AM
On the theme of wild dogs...

Has anyone ever had a fox act in a threatening manner toward them or their pet?

Last October we climbed Washington and after coming down the Jewell trail to the parking lot (it was dusk) we saw a pair of foxes. They were obviously looking for handouts and weren't too afraid to get close to humans. They would slowly take a step or two toward a person or group and when they clapped or shouted or stamped their feet, the fox would retreat a little but, wouldn't leave the lot. While nothing happened, I would have been nervous if we had had our dog with us.
Ross - Tuco, Artex, Abster and me saw a single coyote in the same parking lot area on Saturday. He did not look rabid or anything, but he was certainly looking for handouts.

NH_Mtn_Hiker
06-14-2005, 10:24 AM
On the theme of wild dogs...

Has anyone ever had a fox act in a threatening manner toward them or their pet?

Last October we climbed Washington and after coming down the Jewell trail to the parking lot (it was dusk) we saw a pair of foxes. They were obviously looking for handouts and weren't too afraid to get close to humans. They would slowly take a step or two toward a person or group and when they clapped or shouted or stamped their feet, the fox would retreat a little but, wouldn't leave the lot. While nothing happened, I would have been nervous if we had had our dog with us.

Yes, I think they were accustomed to receiving handouts. :(
This is common around the huts and the Base Station.....Oh look at the cute little foxes.....they look hungry.....

I seriously doubt that a coyote, a fox or even a pair of foxes would choose to tangle with an adult or a medium/large breed dog. (unless it was rabid, injured, or cornered)

Zimmer
06-14-2005, 02:27 PM
Hmmm -- there's also a fox that hangs out looking for handouts at the Rocky Branch trailhead on Jerich Road. Looks well-fed. :(

I've also seen many, many healthy-looking coyotes during daylight hours.

SAR-EMT40
06-14-2005, 02:45 PM
Hmmm -- there's also a fox that hangs out looking for handouts at the Rocky Branch trailhead on Jerich Road. Looks well-fed.


Your kidding. I go there all the time and have never seen him.

Keith

Zimmer
06-14-2005, 02:52 PM
Nope, not kidding. We were there 2 1/2 weeks ago (I think -- maybe it was 1 1/2 weeks? the weekends are blending together...), and he/she WOULD NOT LEAVE. There was another couple there (not feeding him -- yelling at him/her to go away as he was blocking the way to their vehicle). They reported that he had been there the weekend before, too.

It wasn't acting at all unhealthy, just very tame.

Seeker
06-14-2005, 03:28 PM
I saw a fox last winter at night at Zealand Hut. S/he was pretty close to me, but definitely timid. I was still so I could watch it. Very cute, looking for a hand-out. Got none from me.

Recently saw a coyote in the middle of the road at night on the Kanc, right before the hairpin turn. It was snacking on some road kill. We drove up very close to it and it DID NOT BUDGE. Guessing it was hungry. So we stopped the car about 10 feet away and waited for the coyote to grab the road kill and head off, which it did.

My cousin encountered a rabid fox while hiking in AZ. There was no mistaking that something was seriously wrong--I believe it charged them. He husband ended up killing it (with his hiking stick and his feet, I believe) and they hiked out the body so they could report it to fish and game.

Personally, I don't worry about any animals in the Whites (but take precautions when backpacking, of course). While I can certainly understand your unease with being followed, I doubt it will happen again.

Double Bow
06-14-2005, 03:32 PM
My cousin encountered a rabid fox while hiking in AZ. There was no mistaking that something was seriously wrong--I believe it charged them. He husband ended up killing it (with his hiking stick and his feet, I believe) and they hiked out the body so they could report it to fish and game.

WOW!!! Now that's a story!

Seeker
06-14-2005, 03:37 PM
Yeah. They were hiking with their young daughter--my cousin had her in a backpack, so her husband went into "protect my family" mode without even thinking. He was surprised at himself by how quickly and fatally he reacted to the sick fox.

jjo
06-17-2005, 11:20 AM
Bought some Pepper Spray yesterday in a small clip-on that'll fit right on my belt for quick access, if needed. Maybe I'm just reassuring myself. The clerk said make sure I spray downwind or...good luck! :) Saw some bear repellent/spray but it looked HUGE, was $35 and sprayed 25 feet. Maybe overkill...Hope I never see another coyote in stalking mode when my dog is present..

HikerBob
06-17-2005, 11:30 AM
Just an FYI if travelling through Massachusetts:

From http://www.mass.gov (http://www.mass.gov/dfwele/dfw/dfw_bear_problem_faqs.htm#prob17)

"Pepper spray, Mace® and similar less-than-lethal chemical agents are restricted under Massachusetts law and a person must have a Firearms Identification Card to purchase, possess and carry such items."

..also added...

"Based on past events, it is unlikely that persons in Massachusetts should routinely carry pepper spray as a bear defense. Pepper spray should not be used in strong winds, rain, very cold weather, or in dense vegetation. Pepper spray should not be sprayed on the ground, tents, or vegetation as a deterrent. In field studies in Alaska, brown bears were strongly attracted to spray residue and rubbed and rolled in it."

Bob

Dugan
06-17-2005, 11:33 AM
Re. pepper spray for coyotes

On one of my neighborhood walks, we used to frequently run into an aggressive dog that was allowed to roam. This dog attacked my dog a couple of times. I spoke with a few trainers regarding the best way to dissuade an attacking dog. They recommended one of those cans of air that lets out a very loud horn sound. Each spoke against carrying pepper spray if the dog is attacking spraying pepper spray might cause it pain which could in turn cause it to become more aggressive. In addition, if the dog is close to your dog, the spray may affect your dog and/or you as well, thus preventing a hasty retreat. I don't know how well this would apply to coyotes. The horn worked nicely against the dog.

jjo
06-17-2005, 11:42 AM
Just an FYI if traveling through Massachusetts:

From http://www.mass.gov (http://www.mass.gov/dfwele/dfw/dfw_bear_problem_faqs.htm#prob17)

"Pepper spray, Mace® and similar less-than-lethal chemical agents are restricted under Massachusetts law and a person must have a Firearms Identification Card to purchase, possess and carry such items."

Bob

I trust N.H. is not as strict. Its probably more assurance for me than anything but I did not enjoy the coyote encounter. Here in Midwest, I'll carry/try it on day hikes prepping for the magnificent "whites"..

Rugger
06-17-2005, 12:54 PM
I vaguely remember hearing about either telephone or electric company employees carrying a spritzer with ammonia for aggresive dogs. Anyone have an idea of whether there would be permanent damage?

NH_Mtn_Hiker
06-17-2005, 02:05 PM
First of all, let me say that I love animals and would never do anything to hurt the little critters unless it was absolutely necessary.
NOTE: I have hunted in the past for the purpose of putting food on the table, but I no longer hunt.
So no little red squares...ok ;)

About 3 years ago my sister was attacked by one of our neighbors dogs. We soon learned that a one of their other three dogs had attacked another person. Shortly after this I purchased a can of MkIII 10% pepper spray. (police issue type)

One night a few months later I was taking out the garbage. When I turned away from the dumpster the dog that had bitten my sister was standing between me and the house. I attempted to walk aroud him along the road withdrawing my pepper spray from my pocket as I went. The growling dog was walking parallel to the road staying between me and the front door to the house.

I took my eyes off him for a moment to see where the mailbox was before I walked into it. Out of the corner of my eye I saw the dog rushing at me. I brought my left arm up defensively and raised the pepper spray squeezing the trigger as I was aiming. (there wasn't alot of time to aim) The dog turned almost instantly and ran back to his house.

A few months later,
I was again taking the garbage out(That's my job :D), I had just dropped the trash into the dumpster when the neighbors other aggressive dog, this one was much larger than the first one, about 100-120 lbs appeared around the corner of the dumster. He snapped at me then stood there growling, I calmly took out my pepper spray and gave him a little squirt from about 3 feet away. He yelped...turned, and ran away.

These two dogs still live next door to us, but neither of them have ventured onto our property since. They don't even come close.

I could have used some other means of defense but pepper spray is extremely effective and the chance of permanent damage is very remote, and the dogs get to bark another day. :D

By the way, the second dog I sprayed...the big one, is deaf. I don't know how well an air horn would work on him.

NOTE: Don't confuse pepper (OC) spray with mace or tear gas. Pepper spray is far more effective and takes effect much quicker than the other two. That's why it is carried by the majority of police officers in the US.

They do make sprays specifically for dogs, and for bears. The 10% OC spray works well on dogs, black bears, and best of all muggers and rapists.

Pepper spray is most effective when sprayed in the eyes and nostrils of the attacker.

Some more info (http://www.homesafetyonline.com/info/peppersprayfaq.asp)
Even more info (http://www.protectiondepot.com/pepper_spray_faq.htm#blended)

ronandjon
06-17-2005, 02:44 PM
About a month ago, Chili Willie and I saw a coyote, dead, on the side of the Northway, Rt 87, just north of mile marker 74, northbound.

I also remember a story in one of the local Albany papers a year or so ago about a local hunter who was attacked by coyotes and bitten. Seems he was turkey hunting, using a turkey call, and they apparently thought he was a turkey. I think he shot one of them but the other got away. I can't remember how badly he was chewed up, but I am pretty sure he went to the hospital for treatment.

NH_Mtn_Hiker
06-17-2005, 03:05 PM
...I also remember a story in one of the local Albany papers a year or so ago about a local hunter who was attacked by coyotes and bitten. Seems he was turkey hunting, using a turkey call, and they apparently thought he was a turkey...
He's not the only one (http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1815&dept_id=59849&newsid=11855748&PAG=461&rfi=9)
You have to be a member to read the whole story. :rolleyes: No thanks, I get the picture :)

SAR-EMT40
06-17-2005, 03:22 PM
NOTE: Don't confuse pepper (OC) spray with mace or tear gas. Pepper spray is far more effective and takes effect much quicker than the other two.

Absolutely true. I have been in tear gas (CS gas) with people that it didn't effect. I have never met anyone that pepper spray (OC) didn't effect.

I will say though, that I saw a grizzly sniff the air one time when he was sprayed with OC and I swear he acted like he was thinking, umm, extra flavoring. :D

Keith

NH_Mtn_Hiker
06-17-2005, 03:34 PM
...I have been in tear gas (CS gas) with people that it didn't effect...
Tear gas makes my eyes water and my nose runs...that's about it. :)

jbrown
06-17-2005, 03:49 PM
I had a similar experience to Dugan. A dog that lives 4 blocks up from me approached my dog when we were out on a walk. She had to go about 85 lbs, whild my dog was about 40 at the time. My boy was on the leash, she wasn't. They sniffed noses, started to do the circle greeting, and something made her snap. She lunged at my dog, who was just a puppy, mind you, and tried to take him down. It took me 1/2 a second to react and bury my boot tip in her ribcage, I grew up playing soccer. She backed down, yelping and gasping for air while the kids who were supposed to be watching her started yelling, "Daisy! Daisy!" Haven't had any trouble with her since then. They keep her inside or on a leash. Yeah.

mudhook51
06-17-2005, 04:09 PM
My cousin encountered a rabid fox while hiking in AZ. There was no mistaking that something was seriously wrong--I believe it charged them. He husband ended up killing it (with his hiking stick and his feet, I believe) and they hiked out the body so they could report it to fish and game.


Its a good idea never to pick-up , or touch any dead or dying animal you encounter. Its dead or dying for a reason you probaly don't want to become a part of. If attacked and you kill the animal by all means bring it back for testing. Try not to damage the brain and spinal area. My 80+year old father was attacked several years ago by a bobcat while walking ,which was shot and tested positive for rabies. He underwent the treatments, but went downhill rapidly and died a couple of years later. ( He went from walking 3 miles a day and practicing law, to being bed ridden and almost senile)Another friend picked up a dead fox in the road, which tested possitive and ended up taking the shots, as well as his girlfriend who came into contact with the animal. I was bitten by a bat , which I was able to kill, and have tested, negative, and avoided the shots. that summer I destroyed 7-8 racoons on my property, the first tested rabid, after that the health department told me to stop bringing them in. Since , I've heard of everthing from cows to otters being infected. No need to be scared, just careful.

jjo
06-20-2005, 10:34 PM
For Father's Day, my wife and kid's gave me a can of pepper spray. Maybe they do care for my safety a little bit (or is it the dog?). Coyotes beware unless I misfire into my own face :D

NH_Mtn_Hiker
06-20-2005, 11:09 PM
Mudhook51 wrote:
...that summer I destroyed 7-8 racoons on my property...
:eek:
I guess they must have missed the "No Trespassing" sign, huh.

Waumbek
06-21-2005, 06:41 AM
This thread is an interesting coincidence for me. I had only ever seen coyotes in Yellowstone--until yesterday morning. For the last several years, I've heard coyotes on the hill behind where I live in Franconia NH but never actually seen one. Yesterday morning I looked out into my field, suddenly high with grass after all the rain, and saw what I thought was a large fox. The pointy ears suggested fox at least. There was also a turkey in the field so I assumed the fox was after the turkey. But as the "fox" moved into the open, it became clear that it was a coyote. Too big and wrong color for a fox. This was about 9 a.m. The coyote slowly moved across the field and disappeared into the brush. No interest in the turkey. A little digging around turned up this info from F&G on the growing population of this NH newcomer and its relationship to gray wolves of Quebec:

"New Hampshire's Wily Coyote
You may wake up to the sound of coyotes howling in the weeks to come, because February is the peak of the coyote-mating season. Come April, 4 to 8 pups will be born in a den concealed in a brushy slope or under a log pile. The male coyote hunts for the female, bringing her food, which she regurgitates to feed her young. About 70 percent of the pups will die before their first birthday.
The eastern coyote is a relative newcomer to New Hampshire. The first coyote was seen in Holderness in 1944. During the 1970s and 80s, coyotes spread throughout the state. Today, they are entrenched statewide in every available habitat from rural to urban.
Studies by Dr. Robert Wayne of the University of California on tissue samples of New England coyotes found a great deal of wolf blood related to the gray wolf of Quebec. This is why our coyotes, weighing 48-60 pounds, are nearly twice the size of the western species. Coyotes come in an array of colors, from creamy to rust-colored to tawny gray. Their erect, pointed ears and bushy, drooping tails distinguish them from dogs.
Coyotes are opportunists and eat all sorts of things, depending on the time of year. In the summer, they eat fruits and berries, insects and small mammals like rabbits, squirrels and mice. They'll also eat dead animals and prey on deer slowed by deep snow.
New Hampshire trappers have harvested an average of 379 coyotes each year over the past decade. The coyote is the only furbearer species that has a year-round open season for hunting and trapping in the state, but this hasn't reduced New Hampshire's coyote population. No wonder this crafty canid is called "wily coyote!" --Eric Orff, Wildife Biologist; and Dr. Judy Silverberg, Wildlife Educator"