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Thread: When Are Stabilicers Not Enough?

  1. #16
    Senior Member alpinista's Avatar
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    I find the stabilicers helpful this time of year -- though I wasn't smart enough to bring them on my last adventure! In this in between time, I find that for the most part, on most trails, the ice isn't thick enough or consistent enough to warrant crampons, and that wearing crampons would basically be a pain since the spikes would likely get tripped up by the jutting rocks.

    Soon enough though ... it'll be crampons de rigueur!
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  2. #17
    Senior Member skidoc22's Avatar
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    Used "originals" this weekend

    Five of us hiked Algonquin and Iroquois last Sunday with the warmer temps. three had stabilicers and two with crampons. In the thin ice conditions and a lot of bare rock the stabilicers clearly were the better choice. They were more versatile as we alternated from ice to rock around every turn, were pretty good on the less steep spots of thin ice and were fine on the dirt, rock and snow. Didn't loosen up or fall off of any of us and only required one or fewer adjustments over about six miles. Able to wear longer down the mtn when conditions more variable where crampons were a liability. I have seen the other new model (? referred to by Maddy) - they look like an overboot with the same soles as the original. I too wonder if they will be a crampon replacement in more rigorous conditions of colder temps, thicker ice and steeper grades. In the softer ice I could stomp down and get a bite but if it's minus 15deg?
    That said I was very pleased with their performance and would highly recommend them for this season with the variety of conditions which change at every turn in the trail.
    Do what you love, love what you do

  3. #18
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    I've got 12 points, I prefer bigger.

    I'm in the degree of steepness, not sure about Ike but Pierce via C-Path okay, anyplace where snowshoe cleat or less would be manageable
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  4. #19
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spaddock
    Even cheaper: http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page...t=2,51676&ap=1 $37 CDN.

    Are "Icers" and "Stabilicers" the same thing?
    Looks slightly different--compare them to the picture at REI:
    http://www.rei.com/online/store/Prod...cat=REI_SEARCH
    The Stabilicers have a strap over the front of the toe. Otherwise they look the same to me.

    Doug

  5. #20
    Senior Member Jeff-B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul
    Looks slightly different--compare them to the picture at REI:
    http://www.rei.com/online/store/Prod...cat=REI_SEARCH
    The Stabilicers have a strap over the front of the toe. Otherwise they look the same to me.

    Doug
    Doug is correct!
    If you look carefully, the vertical toe webbing wrap is missing on the "icer" brand.
    These are not the "official" original Stabilicers for sure....
    I could easily see the "icer" brand getting the toe jamb-flip-flop effect and maybe injury.
    damn counterfits!

    The models shown at REI and LL Bean sites are the real M'coys.

  6. #21
    Senior Member Lawn Sale's Avatar
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    I have stabilicers, Yax Tracks, and crampons, and each have their use. I wear the crampons when it's deep enough, steep enough, or cold enough, and the others the rest of the time, but I do find they slip off my boots easily.

    Come to think of it, I think I did break a Yax as well.
    Appearances are not everything, it just looks like they are.




  7. #22
    Senior Member stu's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    I also have a pair of stabilicers (the blue ones). I found they worked better on the uphill terrain. A few times, on the steeper downhills, they would slip off my heel. In one incident I slipped and fell. I solved this by attaching a small bungee cord or velcro strap from the heel to toe over the bootlaces. This seemed to help a lot. My advice is to buy a smaller size, since they can be stretched to fit. A good tool for those in between times, but will never replace my crampons.

  8. #23
    Senior Member sardog1's Avatar
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    Evolutionary Stages in the Ascent of Humankind

    Yaktrax, Yaktrax Pro, and their ilk -- What you wear crossing the parking lot to get into the store to buy something more substantial and durable.

    Stabilicer Lite (rubber slip-on-straps, lighter sole, fewer screw heads) -- What you wear on slopes where a slip and slide won't result in fractures, internal injuries, or brain injury, and you're too cheap to buy:

    Stabilicer (Velcro straps, honkin' Vibram sole, lots o'screw heads) -- Ditto on where you wear them but they're tougher, grip like rabid monkeys, and twice as much money as the Lite version. As to when to trade up to the next stage, ask: "What happens if I fall?" If the answer is, "I slide a piece and strike something (tree, rock, bottom of cliff face) with enough force to disable me," then buy:

    Crampons. What you wear when the ice, etc. is deep enough for them to grip and a slip and slide could disable you, not merely bruise you or your pride. Personally I don't hold much with four- or six-point versions, but some like 'em. Ten points are best for walking, some like twelve points for versatility and don't mind walking in them.

    If you're wearing Stabilicers because there's not enough ice to hold a crampon and you're on something steep enough to hurt you in a fall, how will you self-arrest? In other words, if it's too thin for crampons plus ice axe but too steep for Stabilicers alone, find some other route.
    Last edited by sardog1; 11-18-2005 at 08:02 AM.
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  9. #24
    Senior Member spaddock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff-B
    damn counterfits! The models shown at REI and LL Bean sites are the real M'coys.
    Not sure who's counterfeting who. Just did some research and found that "Icer's Inc" has been in production since 1989. Couldn't find a date for Stablicers.

    But I do agree that the toe strap on the "Stabilicers" looks much more secure.


    -Shayne

  10. #25
    Senior Member Chip's Avatar
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    These are new GI Ice Creepers.
    7 spikes, steel, cheap. I think these would be better than yaktrax or stabilicers, but not yet a full crampon.

  11. #26
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sardog1
    Stabilicer Lite ... and you're too cheap to buy:
    Now, be nice, I would have bought the better ones, if I'd known they existed!
    Tom Rankin
    Volunteer Balsam Lake Mountain
    Past President Catskill 3500 Club
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  12. #27
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip
    These are new GI Ice Creepers.
    7 spikes, steel, cheap. I think these would be better than yaktrax or stabilicers, but not yet a full crampon.
    Cotton straps. They will turn into a ball of ice.

    Seem to remember seeing some 20-25yrs ago. Never saw anyone use them...

    Doug

  13. #28
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Rankin
    Now, be nice, I would have bought the better ones, if I'd known they existed!
    The heavy ones look more reliable, but they are also rather heavy: REI lists 1 lb 12 oz. REI lists the lightweights as 10.5 oz. (Don't know if these are shipping or field weights.)

    Looks like the heavies weigh as much as a decent pair of steel crampons.

    Doug

  14. #29
    Senior Member Chip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul
    Cotton straps. They will turn into a ball of ice.

    Seem to remember seeing some 20-25yrs ago. Never saw anyone use them...

    Doug
    Gaiters over the whole set-up will cover most of the canvas straps.
    No bots, obviously, so the build-up certainly may occur in the metal. But probably about the same as 6 point crampons.
    What prevents build-up in the stabilicers, just their flexibility ?

  15. #30
    Senior Member Jeff-B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spaddock
    Not sure who's counterfeting who. Just did some research and found that "Icer's Inc" has been in production since 1989. Couldn't find a date for Stablicers.

    But I do agree that the toe strap on the "Stabilicers" looks much more secure.


    -Shayne
    Well, I am interested enough to go to the company direct and ask, "who was first".
    32North

    Official weight is 24oz. and yes DP, that is nearly the weight of a standard crampon.

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