Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 56 of 56

Thread: Winter day hike pack contents

  1. #46
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    5,597
    I looked last summer at Shaw's and Home Depot, and I couldn't find any, nor could the help I inquired of.

    Since you aren't going to eat it, it doesn't need to be food quality either... Candle quality is probably fine.

    Could I use Swix CH10? (that violates the "cheap" parameter ;-) )

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  2. #47
    Senior Member Mad Townie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Leb, NH
    Posts
    1,110
    Quote Originally Posted by sapblatt
    Isn't this the wax that you can find in a supermarket in boxes along with mason jars and other canning supplies?
    Yup. I use the "Gulf" brand because that's what I found first, and it'll be a long time before it runs out. Making the firestarters takes about 1 brick out of the 4 or 5 in the box.
    Mad Townie

    Take long walks in stormy weather or through deep snows in the fields and woods, if you would keep your spirits up. Deal with brute nature. Be cold and hungry and weary. - H. D. Thoreau

    Easy trails, nice days and comfort are good, too. - M. Townie

  3. #48
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bedford, MA; Avatar: eggs anyone?
    Posts
    10,689
    Quote Originally Posted by bikehikeskifish
    Candle quality is probably fine.
    Candle wax may have additives to raise the melting point.

    Could I use Swix CH10? (that violates the "cheap" parameter ;-) )
    Only if the temp is 32-50 deg F...

    For general winter use, CH6 (10-21F) might be a better choice.

    Just don't use any of the fluro waxes--that may put you in the thread on "which moutain to die on".

    Doug

  4. #49
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    5,597
    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul
    Just don't use any of the fluro waxes--that may put you in the thread on "which moutain to die on".
    I can't afford the fluro waxes to ski on, never mind to make fire starters. The reason I asked was because if I saved all the scrapings over the years of waxing skis, I'd have enough wax to make a few of these things... Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, as they say.

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  5. #50
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Apple Valley Ohio!
    Posts
    711
    For a good firestarter-try Frito's! They burn hot,and if you get the fire going on just one or two,you still have a snack!

    When I build a fire on snow I use a couple of thicker logs as a base to keep the fire up off the snow a bit.

    And,obvious as it may seem,if you have a gas stove with a piezo ignition,you can start a campfire with no matches.

  6. #51
    Senior Member sardog1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    If it ain't snowin' there, we ain't goin' there.
    Posts
    2,581
    My local Hannaford usually has "Gulf Wax" canning paraffin, at least in late summer and fall. I can hook you up with a pound . . . bring your cash and come alone.
    sardog1

    "Å! kjære Bymann gakk ei stjur og stiv,
    men kom her up og kjenn eit annat Liv!
    kom hit, kom hit, og ver ei daud og lat!
    kom kjenn, hot d'er, som heiter Svevn og Mat,
    og Drykk og Tørste og det heile, som
    er Liv og Helse i ein Hovedsum."

    -- Aasmund O. Vinje, "Til Fjells!"

  7. #52
    Senior Member hikerfast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Concord, NH
    Posts
    692

    hiking light

    I was thinking about this thread a bit, and had kind of a final thought. The bottom line is, we were discussing what someone needed in the event that they REALLY had to spend a night out, to stay alive. You can go as light as you usually go, just add 1 of 2 things. (1) shove a -50 down parka in the bottom of your pack,and some overpants, it hardly takes up that much space, or (2)carry a -20 or -40 bag, that weighs around 4+ pounds. This is what you would be using to stay alive overnight(in addition to having capability to start a fire, or without in case your above treeline).You might have to get a little bigger pack, and it would add a couple pounds more. So, no matter who you are, or what you like to carry, for an additional 4 to 7 pounds, you have life insurance.

  8. #53
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    642
    Quote Originally Posted by hikerfast
    I was thinking about this thread a bit, and had kind of a final thought. The bottom line is, we were discussing what someone needed in the event that they REALLY had to spend a night out, to stay alive. You can go as light as you usually go, just add 1 of 2 things. (1) shove a -50 down parka in the bottom of your pack,and some overpants, it hardly takes up that much space, or (2)carry a -20 or -40 bag, that weighs around 4+ pounds. This is what you would be using to stay alive overnight(in addition to having capability to start a fire, or without in case your above treeline).You might have to get a little bigger pack, and it would add a couple pounds more. So, no matter who you are, or what you like to carry, for an additional 4 to 7 pounds, you have life insurance.
    I think your ratings are conservative. One could probably survive without being comforatable in a 0 degree bag, but would need a pad and wind pro like a bivy. Of course this assumes that they have the brains and wherewithall to get below treeline.

    Edited to the third person, instead on second ("you") as in re-reading my post it seemed imply incompetance to Hikerfast and this was not my intention.

    BTW, When I said "brains" I was really referring to decision making ability as hypothermia may be a factor in the situation.
    Last edited by John H Swanson; 01-27-2007 at 02:52 PM.
    "I've been kicked by the wind, robbed by the sleet, had my head snowed in, and I'm still on my feet, and I'm still,...willin"

  9. #54
    Moderator Peakbagr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Near the Adirondack Blue Line
    Posts
    3,757
    One of the foundations of winter hiking safety is your group. Who are they and can you depend on each other?
    The Adirondack Mt Club Winter school for years has advocated that the minimum safe winter party is 4, and that there should be at least 1 sleeping bag and closed cell foam pad.
    The basic idea is that if a person is injured, 1 stays to assist, 2 go for help and the bag can keep the injured person warm, or in a pinch, 2 can squeeze in keeping both warm.

    Over the years, I've always carried extra mittens, socks, hats, bivy, down jacket, etc. Its embarassing to say that while my winter pack is still heavier than is comfortable, I have started leaving out things that I would have never considered doing in the past. I believe that the proper thing is to be self-sufficient, and to have extras for others. I've heard so many conversations over the last 10 years, that go like this: "between us, we have enought emergency clothing", that I'm afraid I've let it slowly influence what I sometimes jettison when daypacking.
    Its hard to admit that I do it, but the thread is a good reminder to rethink my emergency preparations.

  10. #55
    Senior Member Cath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    With Brutie at his 48 in 1 Winter celebration on Cannon 3/05
    Posts
    262
    Quote Originally Posted by John H Swanson
    I find it fun to watch the light weight pack crowd dance around and ask to get going.
    That said, on most days I can't lift my winter daypack because it's too heavy.
    Now that you too are drinking Stoneyfield Yogurt Smoothies and are leaving the 14 PB&J's behind, you'll become one of those light weight'ers and we'll get to see you dance
    Everythings Better Below Freezing

    Beaver Brook Trail Adopter Moosilauke
    Androscoggin Valley Search & Rescue
    NH 4's in 4 days 19 hrs 58 min 2010
    NE 4's in 1 Winter 06/07
    NH 4's in 9 days 23 hrs 13 min March 2006
    NH 4's twice in 1 Winter 04/05 & 09/10
    NH 4's in 1 Winter www.48in1winter.com
    Winter Huts Traverse March 2004 23hrs, 41 mins
    NH 100 Highest in Winter completed 1999
    NE 100 Highest in Winter completed 1998
    NH 12 x 48 completed 2003

  11. #56
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    642
    Quote Originally Posted by Cath
    Now that you too are drinking Stoneyfield Yogurt Smoothies and are leaving the 14 PB&J's behind, you'll become one of those light weight'ers and we'll get to see you dance
    I don't know how I'll be able to keep up with the crowd if everyone knows the secret.
    "I've been kicked by the wind, robbed by the sleet, had my head snowed in, and I'm still on my feet, and I'm still,...willin"

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •