Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 39

Thread: Keeping toes toasty

  1. #16
    Senior Member sleeping bear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Marquette, MI
    Posts
    497
    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul
    Insulating insoles may help, but don't forget that you lose heat from the tops of your feet and your ankles too.

    Doug
    I like to take the foam sleeping pads and make new insoles for my boots, warmer than any 'insulating' pads you can buy. They take up a little more room thought, so they may not work with all boots. I've also used the same foam and made covers that fit over my boots (columbia ice crushers) and my xc ski boots. They only work when my boots are in some sort of binding (ski or snowshoe) but are noticeably warmer than the boots alone.

  2. #17
    Senior Member DrewKnight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Waterville Valley, NH
    Posts
    459

    At least in ski-boots, looser isn't an option...

    Quote Originally Posted by bignslow
    I run into this problem with my snowboarding boots, my feet start fine, then get "cold", then eventually go numb (especially if I don't undo my bindings after each run).
    I have the same exact syndrome in my downhill ski boots... ends in paralyzing cramping under my insteps or across my metatarsals if I don't ease up. I have found that chemical toe-warmers, crutch or not, make all the difference on days below 20 degrees. I unbuckle between runs, and the modest amount of heat seems to keep my toes relaxed and comfortable. I intend to get the boots tweaked for fit (again), which might help, but in the mean time, $1.50 a day doesn't seem too much to pay for comfort and no cramps.

  3. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Dracut, MA
    Posts
    109

    Smile Just some additional thoughts.

    I strongly agree with a previous post: get some good winter hiking boots. They do not have to be plastic mountaineering boots. I have a pair of Sorrel Conquest and they do very well on day hikes up and down mountains. You can always tell your wife that they are usefull when you shovel the driveway as well.

    If your hiking involves fairly flat terrain and snowshoeing, I can not say enough about Steger Arctic Mukluks: Flexable, Breathable (no moisture build up) and warm. I have been out in very very cold and windy conditions without any concern.

    Finally, the secret of keeping your feet warm is simple, keep moving, and keep dry.
    'Whatever wisdom I would find, I know, grows out of the land. I trust that, and that it would reveal itself in the presence of well-chosen companions.'
    B. Lopez

  4. #19
    Banned Kevin Rooney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    3,671
    If you get plastic mountaineering boots, you can add an additional measure of warmth by adding insulated supergaiters (about $100 -yikes!), and put them on over your boots in the comfort of your living room. They're tough to put on, and best done inside. VBLs have been mentioned, as have toe warmers. Some find neoprene socks are better than VBL's but they are much thicker.

    Electric socks are a possiblity (Cabela's) if all else fails. And toe warmers aren't the same as hand warmers - they're thinner and shaped differently.

    Finally - I sized my plastic boots to fit with about the thickest sock available, the boiled wool variety called Dachstein (sometimes called Himalayan) - they're even thicker than the ones you mentioned.

  5. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    224
    Want to forget about your feet? Get plastic boots. In the spring they have big sales at EMS or IME in North Conway were you can buy both boots and crampons for a buck and a quarter.
    Plastic boots are very confortable on any hike. You don't have to be mountaineering. It's interesting how they feel awkward on a floor or pavement and make a racket, but get on the the trail and they are silent and fine.
    Ofcourse I wear my good leather boots a lot in the winter too, but I don't have crampons for them, and use stabilicers.

  6. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Marina del Rey, CA
    Posts
    463
    I have insoles made by Heat Factory that hold a small chemical warmer under the ball of your foot. I have only used them once in a ski boot, but they generate a lot of heat for about 8 hours. The insoles are basically Superfeet (HF gets them under a license) with a slot under the ball of the foot that holds either a foam pad or the heat pack.

    As far as plastic boots go-make sure they fit right. I used plastic mountaineering boots for a course and after a few days could hardly walk because the top of the boot banged against my shin and caused severe bruising, something I didn't really notice until too late.

    Patagonia makes really warm expedition weight socks-expensive, but worth it IMHO. Also, as already said, make sure the boot isn't too tight. Take your socks when you try them on. VBL's might help, but I've never used them.

  7. #22
    Senior Member Paradox's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Holderness, NH, Avatar: Pine Marten on Mt Field
    Posts
    2,268

    Fitting Your Boots

    My feet have always been cold and uncomfortable, until recently. I purchased a pair of mountaineering boots and took them to the local "Feet First" place in Plymouth, to have them fitted. They were stretched in the left toe area and the right heal area. He also gave me a great tip: skipping certain lace holes to put less pressure on the instep area. Made a huge difference in how comfortable and warm I feel at the end of the day.
    A lot of downhill skiers do this for their boots, yet I do not hear of hikers discussing this.
    WNH4K:48/48, SLAT50:50/50, NEHH:100/100, NE115:115/115,
    TW72:60/72, WADK46: 18/46, 52WAV:16/52, Cat35:9/35(39)

  8. #23
    Senior Member una_dogger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Waltham, MA
    Posts
    4,519
    Quote Originally Posted by sherpakid
    Ok, ok, I'll pick up some new insulated boots! And my wife thought I had everthing I needed and wouldn't have to buy more gear this trip!
    Ok, now that you've been convinced to buy I will chime in on my current winter hiking boots!

    I, too, suffer from cold feet and had been doing my winter hiking in my leather summer backpackers.

    I have been wearing this winter Merrell Cameleon Thermo 8's and they are awesome! They are keeping my feet warm, dry and comfortable and they work perfectly with my Denali Evo Ascent snowshoes, Katahoula Microspikes and Black Diamond Contact Strap strap-on crampons. They are rated "waterproof" but I coated them with three layers of a liquid hiking boot waterproofer from EMS.

    I opted for these over plastics because I wanted something that would be comfortable over long distances and wasn't "overkill". Should I head above treeline on the Presis this winter I will prolly rent some plastics for the weekend. But for general winter 4ks these Merrell's are awesome!

    Here's a link to the men's version:
    http://www.onlineshoes.com/productpa...erproof&offer=

    Justifying a winter hiking boot is easy! Consider that you'll get many more winters out of them than you will your summer boots!

    Happy Hiking!
    Last edited by una_dogger; 02-10-2008 at 07:02 PM.
    ADK 46'r NE115'r NEHH NH 48 x 6 NH48W NH 331/576
    Terra NH 48 x 6+ ~93/100 NEHH ~ ADK 35/46 ~RIP~
    Pemi NH4K~ Gem NH4K

  9. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    1,306
    Quote Originally Posted by Paradox
    He also gave me a great tip: skipping certain lace holes to put less pressure on the instep area. Made a huge difference in how comfortable and warm I feel at the end of the day.
    A lot of downhill skiers do this for their boots, yet I do not hear of hikers discussing this.
    I have found that lacing the boot too tight does cause the foot to numb and feel cold (cuts off circulation). I have mentioned in the past that as I lace my boot I roll my toes under to ball up my foot then lock the lace in place (many boots have a lace lock half way up) to give the front of the foot wiggle room, then lace the upper boot snug. I always have warm, happy feet. Try it, it may help.

  10. #25
    Senior Member 1HappyHiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Bethlehem, NH
    Posts
    1,976

    Black Mountain High Country Thermal Socks

    Quote Originally Posted by sherpakid
    Does anyone have any recommendations/solutions to keeping toes warm or do I just have to deal with numb toes for the entire trip?

    -sherpakid
    Obviously donít know if this will work for everyone, but personally have had great success with Black Mountain High Country Thermal Socks. These socks are made with Outlast temperature regulation fiber which was developed with NASA for use in space walk protective clothing (see link below).

    http://gean-edwards.stores.yahoo.net/blackmountain.html

    The Black Mountain socks are surprisingly thin. And it might sound dumb and/or counterintuitive, but I wear the Black Mountain sock over a SmartWool winter sock. Works for me, but for others, no guarantee!!

    P.S. Forgot to mention that my sock combination is worn inside Columbia Ice-Dragon insulated boots . . . sure that helps too!!
    Last edited by 1HappyHiker; 02-11-2008 at 01:25 PM.

  11. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    North NJ
    Posts
    43

    warm feet

    Somebody on this board a month or two back mentioned VBLs and a supplier of such. Anyone reading this remember that post or better yet the one that posted could be reading this and post that information could again.

    LavaFalls

  12. #27
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bedford, MA; Avatar: eggs anyone?
    Posts
    10,704
    Quote Originally Posted by LavaFalls
    Somebody on this board a month or two back mentioned VBLs and a supplier of such. Anyone reading this remember that post or better yet the one that posted could be reading this and post that information could again.
    Info courtesy of dave.m (Dirtbag Pinnah): http://home.comcast.net/~pinnah/DirtbagPinner/vb.txt

    You can use plastic bags for trial VBL socks. They don't last very many trips, but the cost is reasonable.

    Doug

  13. #28
    Senior Member spencer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Maine Avatar: We could use some snow around here
    Posts
    1,483
    I bought some from Stephenson's several years ago and used them only once or twice. I really didn't find the need for them with well insulated plastic boots. I also hated the feel of them.

    the ones I have are very well constructed and I had no complaints with them as a product, just VBLs as a concept.

  14. #29
    Senior Member WinterWarlock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    649
    Quote Originally Posted by Grayjay
    Want to forget about your feet? Get plastic boots. In the spring they have big sales at EMS or IME in North Conway were you can buy both boots and crampons for a buck and a quarter.
    Plastic boots are very confortable on any hike. You don't have to be mountaineering. It's interesting how they feel awkward on a floor or pavement and make a racket, but get on the the trail and they are silent and fine.
    I picked up a pair of Koflach Degre's, based on some recommendations over at ADKHP. Ordered them on-line, too...when they arrived, my wife insisted they sent the wrong thing because she thought they were ski boots. Put 'em on, walked around the house, and almost sent them back!

    But - once you get outside, and there's some give under your feet, or you have snowshoes on, they are fantastic!

    Scott
    The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over.

    Hunter S. Thompson

  15. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Methuen, MA
    Posts
    109

    clean feet!

    Some other hints to help keep feet warm for the day are: Start off with clean and dry feet. Wash your feet with soap and water in the morning. Donít wear the socks to the hiking trail/ ski area that you will be using. Change into clean dry socks when you arrive. Before putting on the clean dry socks sprinkle powder over the toe area, I use gold bond powder.

    I find that polypropelene, or similar fabric, socks work the best for me. I also find that for ski boots thinner is better. I use the thinnest socks I can find.

Similar Threads

  1. Keeping my Stuff Dry
    By Tom Rankin in forum General Backcountry
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-26-2010, 07:37 PM
  2. Keeping Score
    By BIGEarl in forum Q&A - New England
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-20-2007, 03:29 PM
  3. keeping up with the changes of leafs in NYS
    By ADackR in forum General Backcountry
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-19-2005, 07:07 AM
  4. Dipping our toes in "winter waters", Dec 30, 2004
    By mavs00 in forum Trips & Events
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 12-29-2004, 10:53 AM
  5. Keeping the toes warm?
    By carole in forum General Backcountry
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 01-30-2004, 06:29 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •