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Thread: Essential Books?

  1. #46
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B the Hiker View Post
    Nevada Barr writes thrillers set in national parks. She does her research, and everything in the novels are factually correct.

    I have only read Winter Study so far, and it was excellent. Now I'm read High Country, set in Yosemite.
    I've read the series, excellent writing. I also read C.J. Box. He writes a series on a game warden in WY named Joe Picket. You might give it a try, if you like it, the series is over dozen books and still running.

  2. #47
    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    I've read the series, excellent writing. I also read C.J. Box. He writes a series on a game warden in WY named Joe Picket. You might give it a try, if you like it, the series is over dozen books and still running.
    Oh, great! Thank you for the suggestion. I find in general that if I enjoyed one work by an author, I enjoy his or her others as well.

    Didn't read the book, but thoroughly enjoyed the movie version of Wind River.


    Brian

  3. #48
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Cruising New Hampshire History - A Guide to NH Roadside Historical Markers

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony View Post
    ... I was wondering if people could recommend their favorite reads...
    I would not call this one an "essential," but it is a fun and quirky read:

    Cruising New Hampshire History - A Guide to New Hampshire's Roadside Historical Markers
    by Michael Bruno

    A 500 plus page guide to all historical markers in the state. Divided by regions, (White Mountains, Great North Woods, Lakes Region, etc.) the book presents the actual text written on the marker and then expands on that text with a back story and additional details.

    Find out about Granny Stalbird (marker 0229 Jefferson), The Lady Blanch House (marker 0109 Bartlett) or even the Kilburn Brothers Stereoscopic View Factory (marker 0071 Littleton).

    It's a fun read and you can virtually dive into any page and be fascinated and surprised by the information captured by these wonderful markers.

    If you've ever zipped by a roadside marker and wished you had time to stop and read it, this book is for you. (And obviously great bathroom reading!)

    564 pages, paperback, $19.95. Published by Lloyds Hill Publishing, Bethlehem NH
    Nobody told me there'd be days like these
    Strange days indeed -- most peculiar, mama
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  4. #49
    Senior Member Grey J's Avatar
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    Although its a novel (probably actually a novella), The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon by Stephen King is kind of an adventure story about a young girl who gets lost in the woods (on a mythical trail, don't try to locate it) on the New Hampshire/Maine line. I don't even like Stephen King novels and never read his books but this charming story combines my two enduring reasons to return to New England each year, the White Mountains and the Red Sox. Skimming through this thread, which originated 10 years ago, really highlighted how many more people used to post here.
    "I am a pilgrim and a stranger"

  5. #50
    Senior Member richard's Avatar
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    I read this book when it first came out. Excellent . I could not put it down. I’m a big fan of most of his books. Not so much the movies.

  6. #51
    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    I've read the series, excellent writing. I also read C.J. Box. He writes a series on a game warden in WY named Joe Picket. You might give it a try, if you like it, the series is over dozen books and still running.
    Thank you for the suggestion of C.J. Box. I wasn't able to read the first book in the series, and grabbed one some ways in. Deep characters and strong writing. I was surprised at how deeply infused politics was for the characters, but the author himself managed to stay outside, giving the reader a chance to see into a very specific slice of American society.

  7. #52
    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    I heard a book mentioned on the Outdoors podcast, and it sounded intriguing. The Wave: In Pursuit of Rogues, Freaks and Giants of the Ocean, by Susan Casey.

    The writing is so engrossing it was hard to put down! A bit of science on waves, a light touch of global warming, a lot about surfing, and a lot about ocean traffic. Perfectly crafted. Really good!

  8. #53
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B the Hiker View Post
    Thank you for the suggestion of C.J. Box. I wasn't able to read the first book in the series, and grabbed one some ways in. Deep characters and strong writing. I was surprised at how deeply infused politics was for the characters, but the author himself managed to stay outside, giving the reader a chance to see into a very specific slice of American society.
    Excellent, glad you liked it. One of the draws of the series for me, is the insight to the ways of living in a remote state like Wyoming. The ranchers, the outcast, the law enforcement, its quite a contrast to the NH I grew up in. The latest book in the series "Wolf Pack" was just released. I will get on the list at my library, not a buyer of novels.

  9. #54
    Senior Member TEO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grey J View Post
    Although its a novel (probably actually a novella), The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon by Stephen King is kind of an adventure story about a young girl who gets lost in the woods (on a mythical trail, don't try to locate it) on the New Hampshire/Maine line. I don't even like Stephen King novels and never read his books but this charming story combines my two enduring reasons to return to New England each year, the White Mountains and the Red Sox. Skimming through this thread, which originated 10 years ago, really highlighted how many more people used to post here.
    I remember hearing King give a reading from it at UVM when it first came out. I also remember when Sox fans thought/hoped that Tom Gordon would be the next Mo Rivera. Bwahahahahahahaha!

    Let's go Yankees!


  10. #55
    Senior Member Grey J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TEO View Post
    I remember hearing King give a reading from it at UVM when it first came out. I also remember when Sox fans thought/hoped that Tom Gordon would be the next Mo Rivera. Bwahahahahahahaha!

    Let's go Yankees!

    Oh boy, nothing like a deferred Sox/Yanks tiff! What part of New England are you from TEO? SW Connecticut? Ok, some serious Flash Gordon history. The nickname alone should put him in Hall of Fame consideration. He was a pretty good pitcher in Kansas City before the Red Sox signed him . . . as a starter. For those who don't remember him, Gordon was very serious on the mound, slight of build, wiry, but muscular. He pitched a whopping 215 innings for them in 1996 and was 12-9 but with a horrible 5.59 ERA. He pitched another 182 innings in 97, going 6-10 with a more respectable ERA of 3.74 (proving again that W-L record is not a good indicator of a pitcher's worth). Late in the season, someone had the bright idea to convert him to a closer. The experiment led to his breakout year in 1998, referenced by King, in which Gordon saved 46 games, including 43 in a row, with an ERA of 2.72. King is not exaggerating when he implies that there was a magical quality to Gordon that year.


    Alas, the toll of pitching all those innings led to his elbow blowing out the next year and resulted in Tommy John surgery. He kicked around for several years after that trying to regain his form and then, lo and behold, he was signed by the Yankees in 2004, working middle relief and set up in the bullpen. And he did regain his form (though he was never going to supplant Rivera) and had two excellent seasons with NY, pitching 89 innings in 2004 with an ERA of 2.21 and 80 more in 2005 with an ERA of 2.57. So in fact, he excelled for both teams. I think he left NY as a free agent and signed with the Phillies in 2006 where he had one last good season as a closer and saved 34 games. His career kind of petered out after that but he pitched until age 41. His style and flair were undeniable, especially in that magical 98 season. The tap on the chest and the point to the sky.
    "I am a pilgrim and a stranger"

  11. #56
    Senior Member richard's Avatar
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    I remember him well. He was a favorite of mine when he was with the Red Sox. I was glad for him when he came back and pitched pretty good again. Thanks for the informative history lesson.

  12. #57
    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    I just finished The Eight Mountains by Paolo Cognetti. This was last year's Banff Grand Prize winner.

    Fiction. Relationship of a young man over many years to mountains and a friend who lives in them. Insightful, quiet, painful at times, and deeply thought-provoking. I haven't read something this masterful in a long time. Highly recommend!

    Brian

  13. #58
    Member Kyle D's Avatar
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    Brian, I loved The Eight Mountains by Paolo Cognetti. One of the rare times when I've finished a book and flipped right back to page 1 and started again. Your analysis of "insightful, quiet, painful" is spot on. Definitely a story best read slowly, in a dimly lit room (or camp?) with a beverage of choice. Masterful writing that will resonate with anyone who feels mountains at their core. I also read Cognetti's memoir, The Wild Boy, which I did not find as moving.

    I would also highly recommend The Soujourn by Andrew Krivak and the sequel, The Signal Flame. The first has ties to mountains while the second is a story of simple people living in a remote place - reminiscent of "The Deer Hunter."

    For those seeking the slow, contemplative novel with less mountain ties but masterful descriptive writing, I'd Throw in Plainsong by Kent Haruff and Montana 1948 by Larry Watson while you're at it!

    Check out Peter Heller's The River - somewhat of a contemporary Deliverance retelling. If you like his writing, The Dog Stars is a great read as well.

    Not sure if it's already been mentioned, but fans of C.J. Box might enjoy Paul Doiron - a Maine native, former game warden, who has a series (10+ books) of outdoor mysteries/thrillers.
    Last edited by Kyle D; 11-26-2019 at 06:27 AM.

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