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Thread: Essential Books?

  1. #31
    Junior Member Brian Wood's Avatar
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    Mountaineering Book

    I am reading The Last of His Kind about Bradford Washington by David Roberts. Read several books about him but this is the best!
    www.washburngallery.org has some great pictures of Mt. Washington!

  2. #32
    Senior Member WBB's Avatar
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    In re reading some of the earlier post I see numerous mentions of South, and Endurance both of which tell the story of Shackelton’s experience trapped on the ice. Both are great books about an amazing feat. I always thought that his actions on this expedition would serve as a good example for a book on leadership even for today.

    When he returned home after after his pervious attempt to reach the South Pole, having reach the “furthest south” 90 miles short of the pole, his wife asked how he had the strength to turn back so close to his goal. He replied “I thought you would rather have a live donkey then a dead lion”

    In a similar vain but profiling a “dead lion” Roland Huntford’s “Scott and Amundsen” is again in print under the title “The Last Place on Earth” (this apparently to match the title of the movie which was made back in the 80’s). Huintford has somewhat of an axe to grind against Scott who does not come off particularly well. 600 pages that fly by, a great book to read on a winter evening book.

    Having read all three of these books the contrast between these two leaders is striking. Scoot and Shackelton hated each other. Scott was obsessed with beating Shackleton’s times to the pole. In a way Scott was not racing just Amundsen to the pole, but the ghost of Shackleton as well. Given the choice of serving under either of these men Shackleton , wins hands down. To bring all of his men home alive speaks to the strength of courage he demonstrated when he turned back only 90 miles from the South Pole.

  3. #33
    Senior Member TEO's Avatar
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    Forest and Crag anyone? Perhaps it won't put you on the edge of your seat or leave you breathless, but many a tale of adventure and exploration are retold throughout. And, it is the essential book for Northeast hikers.

  4. #34
    Junior Member ryan207's Avatar
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    The very best books you can read are Backwoods Ethics and Wilderness Ethics, by Guy and Laura Waterman. This is a certainty for anyone who truly appreciates the backcountry. You can't read one without reading the other. It will open your eyes to things you've never thought about. It changed my life.

  5. #35
    Senior Member TEO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryan207 View Post
    The very best books you can read are Backwoods Ethics and Wilderness Ethics, by Guy and Laura Waterman. This is a certainty for anyone who truly appreciates the backcountry. You can't read one without reading the other. It will open your eyes to things you've never thought about. It changed my life.
    Indeed. I think that Wilderness Ethics is particularly relevant to the members of this community.

  6. #36
    Senior Member Puma concolor's Avatar
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    I haven't seen mention of my two all-time favorite travel books:

    "A Walk Across America" and "The Walk West" by Peter Jenkins. Absolute classics.

    Many other good books mentioned here. Anything by Bryson is good for a few laughs. I used to read a lot more mountaineering books than I do now. Kind of lost interest in all the chest-thumping. Most can be summed up in "I'm so awesome, got into trouble but survived because I'm so awesome. The End."

    Excellent thread.

  7. #37
    Senior Member kerry13's Avatar
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    Ed Viesturs story of climbing the 14-8k meter mtns, "No Shortcuts to the Top", by Viesturs and Dave Roberts.

    "High Crimes", sorry I forgot the author, but it delves into the dark side of high altitude mountaineering, the corruption, unscrupulous guides, thievery amongst teams, tampering with equipment etc etc. A real eye opener.
    Yesterday is history, Tomorrow a mystery,
    Today is a gift, enjoy it!

    Kerry

  8. #38
    Senior Member Cymbidium's Avatar
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    Here are two more:
    Fatal Forcast (great survival at sea account) by Michael J. Tougias

    The Last Place on Earth (Scott and Amundsen's race to the South Pole) by Roland Huntford
    NH 4K 48x3 ; NH 4k W48; 52WAV 52/52; NE67: 62/67

  9. #39
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by kerry13 View Post
    Ed Viesturs story of climbing the 14-8k meter mtns, "No Shortcuts to the Top", by Viesturs and Dave Roberts.

    "High Crimes", sorry I forgot the author, but it delves into the dark side of high altitude mountaineering, the corruption, unscrupulous guides, thievery amongst teams, tampering with equipment etc etc. A real eye opener.


    I just finished "High Crimes" and it is a great read. The thievery, backstabbing and egomania among Everest guides and teams was certainly eyeopening. I will recommend this book to those who think lawyers have a monopoly on those traits!

    The author, Michael Kodas, writes primarily for the Hartford Courant.

  10. #40
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    Boukreev

    Anatoli Boukreev "The Climb"
    Another one of the many post Everest 96 gang, but this I think was the best. Had he lived, probably been right up ther as one of the best in the world, strongest for sure

    Also take a look at his "Above the Clouds"
    #5704
    "When we are traveling,we tend to think of arriving, and we sacrifice the journey for the sake of the arrival. But life is to be found in the present moment, not in the future."
    --Thich Nhat Hanh--

  11. #41
    Senior Member Adk_dib's Avatar
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    Raymond mentioned "a walk in the woods". It is hiariuos. That "Katz" is some kind of character. Throwing his bottle of water away on the appalacian trail instead of empying it!

    Merles door is another book about hiking dogs. Its a tear jerker.

  12. #42
    Senior Member erugs's Avatar
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    Someone mentioned Forest and Craig, but I have never found the answer to a question I had in that book. Perhaps my questions are just too oddball?

    I'm grateful for this listing, though, and looking forward to reading the new book about Washburn, mentioned earlier here by Brian Wood.
    Ellen

    Volunteer Maintainer: East Pond Trail

    "Through winter-time we call on spring/And through the spring on summer call/And when abounding hedges ring/Declare that winter's best of all/And after that there's nothing good/Because the spring-time has not come... William Butler Yeats

  13. #43
    Senior Member Raymond's Avatar
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    What was the question?

  14. #44
    Member am&pm's Avatar
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    I really enjoyed "North to the Night" by Alvah Simon. A Spititual Odyssey in the Artic.

  15. #45
    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    Nevada Barr writes thrillers set in national parks. She does her research, and everything in the novels are factually correct.

    I have only read Winter Study so far, and it was excellent. Now I'm read High Country, set in Yosemite.

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