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Thread: Stabilicers

  1. #16
    Member peakbagger-paul's Avatar
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    Maybe I should just return the Stabilicers and pick up a pair of Microspikes.

  2. #17
    Senior Member arm's Avatar
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    plenty of folks here have a few screws loose ... not sure if they own stabilicers though

  3. #18
    Senior Member BlackBuffalo's Avatar
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    The big issue I had with Yaktracks was that they tend of peal off my feet when heading uphill. So, the only place I'd ever use them would be level, like walking around the block on an icy day.
    I'm considering picking up Microspikes, as an alternative to my crampons.
    DaveG.

  4. #19
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    32North produces bags of ~50 replacement screws for Stabilicers. Available at EMS for ~$5. There are two types of screws (1 for the Sport model, 1 for the regular model)--make sure you get the proper type.

    I used Shoe Goo to glue my screws in. Haven't lost any screws, but I haven't given the Stabilicers very heavy use.


    There have been a number of previous threads on this topic. Search and ye shall find.
    Synopsis:
    * Yaktrax don't give that much traction and don't hold up.
    * Stabilicers work pretty well, but are a bit heavy and can lose screws
    * Microspikes work well and are lighter.

    Doug
    Last edited by DougPaul; 11-24-2008 at 12:41 PM.

  5. #20
    Senior Member BobC's Avatar
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    As far as stability on mixed ice and rocks, I know what you mean in thinking that the Stabilicers might feel more steady than the Microspikes. It's true that if you're walking on any hard, rocky surface for more than a few steps, there is a slight "wobbly" feel to the Microspikes that feels a little worse than with Stabilicers. But I find that once I put the Microspikes on, I just change my walking style. Where I'd favor stepping on dry rocks while barebooting, I'll start to favor stepping on icy rocks or just icy trail sections once the traction is on. The occasional forced step onto a dry rock or two hasn't been a problem.

    On my Saturday hike there was one person wearing Stabilicers. Since I was hiking directly behind her for a while, I noticed the old problem that is the main reason I decided to ditch them: they kept slipping off her boots. First it was just the heel part that started sliding over, then at one point one of them just flipped right off her boot and was only hanging on by the front straps. It's tough to adjust those velcro straps tightly enough to keep the Stabilicers on for a whole hike. I think she'll be buying Microspikes soon.

  6. #21
    Member peakbagger-paul's Avatar
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    Do the spikes on Microspikes last? Can you sharpen them like crampons, or have people found that there's no need to?

  7. #22
    Senior Member BobC's Avatar
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    Hard to say whether they last. I bought them last year and have used them about 5-6 times. So far, no problems. They're not that sharp to begin with so I'm not sure if sharpening them would be required. As an example, where you might be able to cut yourself with a true crampon spike, I doubt that you could do so with a Microspikes spike. I think the spikes on Microspikes are about 3/8 of an inch - also a lot shorter than real crampons. I'm a bit concerned with long-time use because the chains between the spikes seem like they might snap at some point. But like I said above, so far so good.

  8. #23
    Senior Member Tim Seaver's Avatar
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    Triple hobs, tricounis and clinkers

    Then there is the home-grown alternative to all that store-bought dreck that wobbles, breaks, and falls off jus' when you don't want it to.

    Joining the First Church of Screwbootery

    It's not for everyone. Just the devoted.

  9. #24
    Senior Member ColdRiverRun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Seaver View Post
    Then there is the home-grown alternative to all that store-bought dreck that wobbles, breaks, and falls off jus' when you don't want it to.

    Joining the First Church of Screwbootery

    It's not for everyone. Just the devoted.
    You need to put up the picture of the Nascar style pit stop you guys did on MEB in the parking lot that day last winter with the screw guns.
    Cory D
    “I don’t know if momma was right or if it’s Lieutenant Dan. I don’t know if we each have a destiny… or if we're all floating around accidental like.. on a breeze. But, I think… maybe it’s both… maybe both are happening at the same time.” –Forrest Gump.

  10. #25
    Senior Member Tobit's Avatar
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    Taking screw guns to my $300 Asolos.. hmm, we'll.. I've done worse things I suppose.

  11. #26
    Senior Member The Hikers's Avatar
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    Last year was a bad year to get an evaluation of our yaktrax. We had SOOO much snow that we used the snowshoes....even got to add the extensions.
    The Yaktrax worked real good on hard packed snow. I have been meaning to give em a running try on an iced over pond. Maybe this year.
    I doubt we'll invest in anything expensive for the kind of hiking we do in the Winter

  12. #27
    Senior Member Tim Seaver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobit View Post
    Taking screw guns to my $300 Asolos.. hmm, we'll.. I've done worse things I suppose.
    Yes. It is a test of faith that can't be avoided.

    Most boots can walk the path, but some "soles" simply can't be saved.

  13. #28
    Senior Member Jason Berard's Avatar
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    one of the faithful!

    I turned my winter boots into screwboots last winter! I am a convert to be sure!
    Its just one less reason to have to stop in the cold winter woods....

  14. #29
    Member islandside's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Microspikes

    I have found the Microspikes to be very useful on terrain that is not too steep.

    The chains are like tire chains for the feet! The chains and the triangle shaped spikes are made of a very durable stainless steel. Mine have not appeared to be getting dull at all, and I have worn them on rocky/mixed terrain. Stainless steel will not dull easily, but it will also not take to sharpening too easily either.

    They excel at "ease of use", are lighter, and grip better then the stabilicers. But, I would never use Microspikes where crampons are called for. For example, I would wear crampons, not the Microspikes descending one of the Hancocks.
    Greg

    See my videos at ...

    www.youtube.com/islandside

  15. #30
    Senior Member Oldmanwinter's Avatar
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    Another vote for microspikes. My wife and I both have stableicers and have never lost a screw (want to buy a bag of replacement screws). The spikes are just so much lighter. We use the yaktrax when walking around the house.

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