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Thread: Grivel G10 or Microspikes?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Quietman's Avatar
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    Grivel G10 or Microspikes?

    A local consignment store has a pair of almost new Grivel G10's (without the antibots) for $50 and EMS has Microspikes for $47.
    I can't justify the cost of both but am really tired of losing screws out of my Stabilicers even after using shoe goo and other glues.
    I'm thinking that for hikes up Monadnock and other smaller hills, and an occasional winter 4k (not 5 or 6k) the microspikes and my snow shoes would give me what I need, and that the G10's would approaching overkill.

    I'm interested which way hikers with more winter experience would go.

    Thanks for your help!

  2. #2
    Senior Member TDawg's Avatar
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    Sounds like microspikes could be a good fit for ya. I have both the G10 and microspikes and use the microspikes far more. Most of my winter hikes have been what u described, 4ks and other smaller mountains around my area (Campton/Thornton). I've found the spikes grip very well into the ice, you just have to try and keep your foot flat to the ice so all the points dig in. So if you pick your route wisely and avoid trails with steep glare ice (no front points with the microspikes), microspikes should be fine. Not sure what the weight comparison is, but I'd suspect microspikes are lighter than the G10.

  3. #3
    Banned Kevin Rooney's Avatar
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    I'd opt for the G10's and consider replacing the screws in your stabilizers with the one's Tim Seaver recommends in this tutorial.

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    You have to understand what your ‘needs’ are. Not just a 4K or something smaller but a need to summit whatever you are hiking or are you satisfied to turn around and adjust your goal for the day. A week ago I ‘needed’ crampons to summit Mt. Major (1786’), but didn’t have them with me (had microspikes), so rather than an up-and-over-the-summit I hiked around the summit (even then the crampons would have be better for the upper slopes). Of course this was after our nice little ice storm. Today snowshoes would be just fine, as they were most of last year. I never even used my crampons last year anywhere. But when I ‘needed’ the winter 4K’s I ‘needed’ crampons (but not an ice axe – oh, that’s another thread ).

  5. #5
    Moderator Peakbagr's Avatar
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    I like Tim's adaptation, but the Stabilicers folks will readily mail you a package of replacement screws for free and they claim the replacements will eliminate the lost screw syndrome.
    I'd expect they'd replace your existing pair if the replacement screws don't solve the problem.

  6. #6
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    There is no hard and fast answer. Sometimes one is better for the conditions, sometimes the other. However, a good set of crampons can take you anywhere the microspikes will and then some. You may just have to sharpen them more often if you have to use them on rock or bare sections of trail.

    There have been times when one needed crampons just to leave the parking lot...


    Carole:
    Historically (up to the '30s or '40s) climbers used to wear nailed boots (dull iron and steel "nails") and cut steps with their ice axes on steeper terrain. You can still cut steps with a modern ice axe--it can be faster than putting crampons on for short sections of ice. (For a quick look back in time see http://www.nps.gov/history/history/o...11/vol3-2c.htm.)

    A picture of nailed boots: http://www.teara.govt.nz/TheBush/Bus...aineering/3/en
    Some of the patterns on Vibram soles are based upon traditional nailing patterns.

    Doug
    Last edited by DougPaul; 12-21-2008 at 01:53 PM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Quietman's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies so far!

    As for the stabilicers, I picked them up cheap($20) at EMS after someone else returned them for shedding screws. I figured that shoe goo would solve the problem, but on a jaunt up S. Pack after the ice storm, I slipped and fell hard. When I looked at the stabilicers, the outside screws on both were missing. I've also lost screws while shoveling the roof so my confidence in them for a long hike is lacking to say the least. Maybe too much rubber has been lost from the holes.

    My wife wants something to give me for Christmas, so I'm trying to give her a useful idea! Overall, it appears that Microspikes provide better traction than stabilicers so either of my choices would be an improvement over them.

    Also, my winter boots(Salomons) are pretty flexible, and the G10's have some flex but not that much. Would this be a problem?

    Thanks!

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    Senior Member Oldmanwinter's Avatar
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    Go for both, you'll use them. I have all three and never use the stableicers anymore, too heavy.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Quietman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldmanwinter View Post
    Go for both, you'll use them. I have all three and never use the stableicers anymore, too heavy.
    I wish, but after spending $699 for a generator that got us through 8 days without power, and $25 a day for the gas to run it, funds are really tight right now.

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    Senior Member ColdRiverRun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Rooney View Post
    I'd opt for the G10's and consider replacing the screws in your stabilizers with the one's Tim Seaver recommends in this tutorial.
    I'm with this. From a simple money stand point your getting a great deal on the G10's, your paying normal cost for the Microspikes. I also agree with the "overkill" in most situations statement, but it is practicing in those overkill situations that will make you prepared when you need them for the "real" situation.
    Cory D
    “I don’t know if momma was right or if it’s Lieutenant Dan. I don’t know if we each have a destiny… or if we're all floating around accidental like.. on a breeze. But, I think… maybe it’s both… maybe both are happening at the same time.” –Forrest Gump.

  11. #11
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    You can look at it this way -- the Microspikes will get you everything you had and everywhere you could go with the Stabilicers without losing screws.

    If that's your goal, then Microspikes might be perfect.

    No offense to the Stabilicer folks for mailing you new screws when you need them, but it is far, far preferable to have something that requires little or no attention or maintenance in the first place.

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  12. #12
    Senior Member cushetunk's Avatar
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    I think Carole's post is spot-on.

    Also, since you've got soft boots, it's not as though you are planning to do any big crampon work. Anyway, I think the only reason that the G10 became popular for northeast hiking is that you could use it on walking trails without risking shredding your ankles. If I were buying traction gear now, I'd keep my sharp G12 crampons for mountaineering work, and get something without front points for trail hiking. I doubt I would buy G10 crampons, which are mediocre at all things and excel at none.

    So, I suspect that you'd get much more general traction use out of the microspikes.

  13. #13
    Banned Kevin Rooney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cushetunk View Post
    ... Anyway, I think the only reason that the G10 became popular for northeast hiking is that you could use it on walking trails without risking shredding your ankles. If I were buying traction gear now, I'd keep my sharp G12 crampons for mountaineering work, and get something without front points for trail hiking. I doubt I would buy G10 crampons, which are mediocre at all things and excel at none.
    I quite disagree with you on this. In my experience, the G10 is anything but mediocre. I've used my G10's everywhere in the Northeast, as well as on Shasta, Adams, Hood, St Helens, Whitney, San Jacinto, etc. The only time I've been glad I had the G12's is on Rainier.

  14. #14
    Moderator Peakbagr's Avatar
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    There are trade offs with the microspikes vs Stabilicers. I have both.

    The Stabilicers, when the screws don't fall out (and mine don't) are a pretty stable platform. What I like is that as long as the footing isn't hard ice, or exposed, the Stabilicers work OK. The screws don't bite into the ice as deeply or effectively as the microspikes, and the SI's are heavy and the velcro is a pain when it gets snow on it.
    The Microspikes are far lighter, bite better, can be more easily carried, but up in the air as to longer term durability. We know a few people who have already had a metal failure and the rubber rand break or be cut through.

    I still strongly prefer the MS's in comparison to Stabilices for now.

  15. #15
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    The snow DOES get in the Velcro - strike 1. Any sharp rocks cut the straps - strike 2. Screws fall out - strike 3... mine site in my trunk in case I need to cross an icy parking lot or push a car. They won't ever come hiking with me again.

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

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