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Thread: Snowshoe vs barebooting

  1. #31
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    i can't believe i'm posting this...but...

    i assume why a lot of people post hole is because they probably don't own snowshoes...

    i also went winter hiking multiple times before i even knew what post holing was

    lastly, a lot of times people don't realize that they are aggravating other people...until it is pointed out to them. For instance, I had gone winter hiking a bunch of times and seen the big holes and never actually thought to complain about the holes that everyone else complains about until it was pointed out. once someone pointed out the whole "postholing" thing...now I notice everytime. Kind of like someone at work who has an annoying habit and you never notice, but once someone points it out...the annoying habit that you never noticed before can drive you into the looney bin...

    -carm

    P.S. I do not own snowshoes...

    P.P.S. However...I have borrowed them many times...
    "Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature's peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop off like autumn leaves."
    —John Muir

  2. #32
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike P. View Post
    please enlighten those of us who don't gleefully don our snowshoes at the first sign of snow how strapping 2-3 pounds on our feet is easier than not strapping them on.
    Improved and more predictable footing saves energy. You also put less energy into compressing snow.

    Doug
    Last edited by DougPaul; 12-29-2008 at 04:19 PM.

  3. #33
    Senior Member sardog1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul View Post
    Improved and more predictable footing saves energy. You also put less energy into compressing snow.

    Doug
    Yup. My stride with snowshoes is significantly longer than my bareboot stride in the same conditions, so I'm taking fewer steps to cover the same distance. Fewer steps, plus the easier balancing from the "(i)mproved and more predictable footing," is less work expended to cover the same distance, even if I'm lifting the snowshoes each step. I know this from long, long experience of snowshoeing (and from some experience looking for postholers who were in trouble . . . )
    sardog1

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  4. #34
    Senior Member dug's Avatar
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    I've often found if there is any slippage at all, a snowshoe will be more beneficial since each foot stride is like on a sidewalk. A heavy, clumsy hunk of aluminum aside. Add a little slipping and sliding, even for a few inches, and it can be a drag in boots.

    Now, more importantly, how do I go about mandating taller hikers pass the trails before me?

  5. #35
    Banned Kevin Rooney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Hikers View Post
    Heck, and I thought Imbroglio was some kind of pasta
    In some circles I think it is. And for dessert they usually serve balaclavas, which is the how the rest of us eat baklava.

    Amazing what you can learn online in your spare time, isn't it?

  6. #36
    Senior Member forestgnome's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul View Post
    Improved and more predictable footing saves energy. You also put less energy into compressing snow.

    Doug
    I'm not the technical/physics type, but I cannot agree more with results. I find wearing my 36" Tubbs to be far more comfortable and enjoyable than even a slight slippage of barebooting on a packed trail. My stride is longer and normal, and each step is firm as if I'm walking on pavement. The foot lands on a flat surface (the snowshoe). I can walk over hiker and moose postholes like they don't even exist.

    There is no question about it; it's far more comfortable and enjoyable for me. Just my $.02.

    happy trails

  7. #37
    Senior Member forestgnome's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Metsky View Post
    As Roy mentioned, we have this discussion every winter, and it's unlikely people's minds are going to change as a result.
    I would most respectfully point out that this is true for veterans, but there are always new folks reading these pages and , as Carmel stated, they may be completely unaware of the issue until they read/hear about it. Such is the reality for veterans of any pursuit; we must remind ourselves of the value of seemingly pointless discussion of basics.

    happy trails

  8. #38
    Senior Member adktyler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by forestgnome View Post
    I would most respectfully point out that this is true for veterans, but there are always new folks reading these pages and , as Carmel stated, they may be completely unaware of the issue until they read/hear about it. Such is the reality for veterans of any pursuit; we must remind ourselves of the value of seemingly pointless discussion of basics.

    happy trails
    Thanks! I for one, appreciate it

  9. #39
    Senior Member Oldmanwinter's Avatar
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    I have been scolded in the past while wearing crampons and carrying my snowshoes. There was three of us in the party ascending a trail, two were wearing crampons and one was wearing snowshoes when we met a VFTT user and longtime hiker descending. We were leaving footprints (not postholes) about 1 inch deep. We politely took the speech under advisement and moved on. I will wear my snowshoes instead of postholing but not necessarily while leaving footprints.
    Last edited by Oldmanwinter; 12-31-2008 at 12:22 PM.

  10. #40
    Senior Member BobC's Avatar
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    The next barebooter I see, I'm going to throw my snowshoes at him. Then maybe I'll become famous like that Iraqi guy.

  11. #41
    Senior Member andrewb's Avatar
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    Good to hear a lot of different viewpoints, many of which had valid points. I am not in favor of regulations or rules, that makes hiking more like the daily world we all strive to escape temporarily. There are conditions when snowshoes are not the best choice - when this happens you should take them off. I think the problem is many people push the envelope, saying smugly to themselves "These conditions are OK to bareboot," when they really aren't. It is a free country; do as you wish. I wish for days after a big storm, when we can break trail all day and have a blast --- and our own trail!

  12. #42
    Senior Member RoySwkr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldmanwinter View Post
    There was three of us in the party ascending a trail, two were wearing crampons and one was wearing snowshoes when we met a VFTT user and longtime hiker descending. We were leaving footprints (not postholes) about 1 inch deep.
    I take it that Cinder was one of those wearing crampons not snowshoes? Which could lead to a whole new flame war - postholing by dogs - WMNF bans them on some XC trails :-)

    If you want to eliminate 1" holes in snow, now you're talking about banning certain brands of snowshoe crampons particularly when snow is balling up on them

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewb View Post
    I wish for days after a big storm, when we can break trail all day and have a blast --- and our own trail!
    Go bushwhacking, you can break trail anytime :-)

  13. #43
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    I will have to respectfully disagee. I know that on my last trip up Pierce (it used to be a bridal path so grades are pretty easy) I never slipped, not once. Adding more weight to my foot for some cleats & floatation I did not need would have been pointless.

    Slipping would have to occur many times before snowshoes would be preferrable, IMO. (the grades on Fishin Jimmy above after the first 1/2 mile or so come to mind - I seem to recall, putting the shoes on for that reason but it was every 20-40 feet that one foot would slip)

    My stride with snowshoes changes slightly, my feet are a bit wider apart (because one shoe can't overlap the other without falling) but I don't shorten my stride without them or take longer strides with them.

    When throwing snowshoes at me, please throw both, that way I'll have a spare pair, one extra doesn't do me much good, of course you'll be barebooting it back to your car. (Or if that sarcasm sound too inflammatory - do I need to weight for you to sit down, take off your snowshoes before you throw them???)
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  14. #44
    Senior Member BobC's Avatar
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    Ha ha! If you'd be so kind to wait for me to take them off, I'd appreciate it!

    In all seriousness, I seem to be one of the few people that actually prefers to use snowshoes, even when they're not absolutely necessary. I do find it to be a mild annoyance to hike on a postholed trail, but I don't care about it enough to get into flame wars online about it. It's just not worth it. My feeling is that if you want things to be easy, you can stay home and sit on the couch and you'll never have to worry about trail conditions. Hiking is all about overcoming challenges, and if I end up on a postholed trail, well, then that's just another challenge to face that day.

    Peace.

  15. #45
    Senior Member pks4000's Avatar
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    Barebooting either impoverished,stupid or selfish

    It's been my experience that barebooters care not about the knees and orthopedic safety of other climbers.

    So unless your poor if I run into you screwing up a trail you better be faster.
    CLimbing Stallion/BMT
    Climbing Stallion/BMT

    Whose woods these are, I think I know. His house is in the village tho. Would He not mind If I climb on, to watch His woods fill up with snow? R. Frost (paraphrased)undefined

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