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Thread: I need a good hat

  1. #16
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IndianChris View Post
    I swear by this hat. You wont be able to hear anything but it keeps your bean warm (windstopper is key). Not bulky, folds up easily and looks pretty cool too if you ask me.
    I have that hat (or one very similar to it, Mtn Hardwear windblocking fleece) and generally find it to be too hot and steamy for me. As you note, it also kills your hearing. (Shell hoods also impair your hearing--I will use a hat or balaclava if possible before raising my hood.) The only place that I might use such a hat would be in high winds (where a balaclava might be also be appropriate).

    For me, a knitted wool* cap (eg the Navy watch cap design) generally works best: warm, breathable, water resistant, comfortable, and not too damaging to my hearing. Comfortable to sleep in, too.

    * Wool is the original soft shell fabric. Only we didn't know it back then...

    YMMV.

    Doug

  2. #17
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    If it's cold and windy enough to wear the MH Dome then I can't hear much anyway

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  3. #18
    Senior Member sardog1's Avatar
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    In addition to several items already mentioned here that I use, my wool and polypro balaclava has its place on the list. It wicks moisture out and insulates superbly at the same time. I haven't been able to recall where I got it. Here's a similar one. Add a thinner nose-covering balaclava underneath, and I'm good to go in very cold conditions. The addition of a shell jacket hood makes it even warmer when it's windy.
    sardog1

    "Å! kjære Bymann gakk ei stjur og stiv,
    men kom her up og kjenn eit annat Liv!
    kom hit, kom hit, og ver ei daud og lat!
    kom kjenn, hot d'er, som heiter Svevn og Mat,
    og Drykk og Tørste og det heile, som
    er Liv og Helse i ein Hovedsum."

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  4. #19
    Senior Member BobC's Avatar
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    I have that type of Mountain Hardwear hat, that's my primary hat - it's nice and warm. I also love my Mad Bomber hat. Yes, it can sometimes be too hot for hiking but above treeline it's nice. Also kept me fairly warm on a sub-zero day last January with 25-mph winds. If you're just going to be using it for non-hiking purposes I say go with that type. I saw a thinner version of the Mad Bomber hat (it's still called a Mad Bomber hat though) in TJ Maxx yesterday for $16.99.

  5. #20
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    Best winter toque

    I purchase a toque a few years ago from MEC. Best winter hat I have ever had. Looking at the label it is made of Icelandic Lopi Wool. Hand made. About 1/2 inches thick. Very warm and very breathable.
    'Whatever wisdom I would find, I know, grows out of the land. I trust that, and that it would reveal itself in the presence of well-chosen companions.'
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  6. #21
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    I have an EMS hat similar to the Campmor design in TCD's post. It spends 98% of my winter trips in the bottom of my pack. (I am usually hotter than most hikers, staying cool is the main problem I have)

    If it's not too cold, I'll use a poly-pro ear warmer or a poly pro hat. Typical winter temps of teens & low 20's in a old wind-bloc Ear warmer (much warmer than the ones sold at EMS the last 7-9 years) When I get higher up or it's colder I'll usually go from the ear warmer to the wind-bloc balaclava.

    On most winter trips the two pieces of wind-bloc are all I use.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  7. #22
    Banned Kevin Rooney's Avatar
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    In winter I carry 3 hats - midweight wool, heavyweight wool, and when it's very cold and windy this one from OR - it's made of WindStopper fleece, which is one notch up from WindBloc.

    Other gear manufacturers make similar ones, including Cabelas. The advantage of this style is that you can pull the ear flags under your chin for additional warmth.

    And yes - it's tough to hear when wearing WindStopper. That's not necessarily a bad thing when you're in windy conditions.

  8. #23
    Senior Member IndianChris's Avatar
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    The main reason I want it to be really warm is because I'll wearing it while standing in the February cold waiting for the subway in Boston.
    The mountain hardware hat referenced in my earlier post would be great for cold days in Boston waiting for the subway. Overheating is probobly not an issue...but like I said, it's a little difficult to hear with it on.

    People referenced a lot of good hats here but as you say, you're standing, waiting.
    HEY!!!
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  9. #24
    Senior Member TCD's Avatar
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    The hearing problem is worse when those windstopper hats are under a climbing helmet. And you often need to hear your partner.

    I cut small (1/4" or so) ear holes in my windstopper hats. It fixes the hearing problem; it doesn't seem to let in much cold wind; and to date I have not had any hats start to unravel or have problems with the holes expanding.

  10. #25
    Senior Member Pete_Hickey's Avatar
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    I'm a three hatter as well.

    The main hat is a toque, similar to the Swix thing. I like it because it's quite thin... thin enough to fit under a bike helmet (which is no use in the mountains)

    Then, when it gets colder, I have an old, polypro cagoule (are they called baklava in English?) which I wear under the toque. Very thin and small, rolls up into a ball which is smaller than a polypro sock (which I frequently confuse it for)

    Finally I have a fleece baklava which I wear over the other two, when it gets real cold. I got this from the Canadian National Biathlon team about 15 years ago. Much too warm for moving. Only while sitting at camp
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  11. #26
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete_Hickey View Post
    The main hat is a toque, similar to the Swix thing. I like it because it's quite thin... thin enough to fit under a bike helmet (which is no use in the mountains)
    I carry a fleece or knitted wool watch cap--very similar to a toque.

    Then, when it gets colder, I have an old, polypro cagoule (are they called baklava in English?) which I wear under the toque. Very thin and small, rolls up into a ball which is smaller than a polypro sock (which I frequently confuse it for)

    Finally I have a fleece baklava which I wear over the other two, when it gets real cold. I got this from the Canadian National Biathlon team about 15 years ago. Much too warm for moving. Only while sitting at camp
    Close--its balaclava in English. Baklava is a Greek pastry.

    I have several of varying weights in wool and fleece, and often carry two--a very light fleece one and a heavy wool or fleece. I use the heavy one in combination with a face mask and goggles when conditions dictate. The heavy balaclava is also useful for camping and sleeping.

    And sometimes I add a spare. For instance carrying both a wool and fleece watch cap. (Wool is better in precip, either is fine if dry.) Greedy trees have also been known to try to steal my caps...

    My windblock cap often doesn't make the cut--if conditions are bad enough to need it, I'm generally happier with a balaclava.

    Doug
    Last edited by DougPaul; 12-14-2009 at 11:54 AM.

  12. #27
    Senior Member Little Rickie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete_Hickey View Post
    I'm a three hatter as well.

    The main hat is a toque, similar to the Swix thing. I like it because it's quite thin... thin enough to fit under a bike helmet (which is no use in the mountains)

    Then, when it gets colder, I have an old, polypro cagoule (are they called baklava in English?) which I wear under the toque. Very thin and small, rolls up into a ball which is smaller than a polypro sock (which I frequently confuse it for)

    Finally I have a fleece baklava which I wear over the other two, when it gets real cold. I got this from the Canadian National Biathlon team about 15 years ago. Much too warm for moving. Only while sitting at camp
    You really strike me as the mad bomber hat type.
    Peace

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  13. #28
    Senior Member Little Rickie's Avatar
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    Have a nice day.
    Last edited by Little Rickie; 01-03-2010 at 07:17 AM.
    Peace

    "How one parses a question tells you as much about the person as how they answer the question."

    Oldee Won Balogeena

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Technetium View Post
    The main reason I want it to be really warm is because I'll wearing it while standing in the February cold waiting for the subway in Boston.

    Any suggestions?
    I use an Ibex Top Knot hat, made from Loden wool, and a Wild Things EP parka with an insulated hood.

  15. #30
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    If you don't mind looking like Margie from "Fargo," you might give these guys a go. They have a lot of different designs.

    http://www.madbomber.com/

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