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Thread: MSR Lightning Ascents, R.I.P.

  1. #16
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sardog1 View Post
    A couple of grace notes to this excellent parsing. The Evo line (Denali Evo and Denali Evo Ascent) has its own tail, six inches in length. It is only compatible with the Evo line.

    The non-Evo line of Denali and Denali Ascent has its own tail options, four inches and eight inches in length. These are only compatible with the non-Evo 'shoes.
    Figures!
    Tom Rankin
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  2. #17
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeCedar View Post
    The first strap shears off on the little toe side because it repetitively hits the inner side of the rail. If you need a new gray strap, let me know. I have several spares "harvested" from the Lightnings.
    You know, I remember reading about this last winter!

    Is there a solution to this? I think I remember seeing something.....

    I have plenty of straps!
    Tom Rankin
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  3. #18
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sardog1 View Post
    A couple of grace notes to this excellent parsing. The Evo line (Denali Evo and Denali Evo Ascent) has its own tail, six inches in length. It is only compatible with the Evo line.

    The non-Evo line of Denali and Denali Ascent has its own tail options, four inches and eight inches in length. These are only compatible with the non-Evo 'shoes.

    Regardless of whether you view yourself as hardcore, the Evo and the non-Evo Denali/Denali Ascent are known among their users for superior traction, long durability, and good value. And you can work the bindings with mittens when you turn hardcore.
    The toe hole on the Evo is bigger than the toe hole on the non-Evo. This can be important if your boots have big toe sections. (The sharp plastic edge was damaging my supergaiters until I switched to the Evo.)

    Doug

  4. #19
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Rankin View Post
    You know, I remember reading about this last winter!

    Is there a solution to this? I think I remember seeing something.....

    I have plenty of straps!
    I found the old thread. Unfortunately, all the pics have been deleted, but I think I know what I need to do.
    Tom Rankin
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  5. #20
    Senior Member Paradox's Avatar
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    I just developed a new system for my Denali Evo Ascent's.

    I purchased a new set and plan on carrying a spare snow shoe with me.
    WNH4K:48/48, SLAT50:50/50, NEHH:100/100, NE115:115/115,
    TW72:60/72, WADK46: 18/46, 52WAV:16/52, Cat35:9/35(39)

  6. #21
    Senior Member erugs's Avatar
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    My old Tubbs were in great shape until I looked at this thread and then looked at the bottom of my snowshoes. I've got three out of four possible deck material tears near the front crampon rivet. Now what? Short term, I have a pair of Atlas that I picked up from an EMS rental sale. Longer term, I'd like to find out if the shoes can be repaired. Crying.
    Ellen

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  7. #22
    Senior Member blaze's Avatar
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    Here's a shot of my friend's busted Tubbs snowshoe (on my foot) after some hasty, Rube Goldberg type field repairs, applied with very cold hands, on Saturday 1/9, just shy of the Zealand summit:



    While the snow was not brutally deep, it was still a bad place to have this happen. Nine miles from the road. And the snow was deep enough so that somebody would have hopped like Festus, expending considerable energy, all the way back to where we'd dropped our skis.

    I used some velcro straps, and knotted a bandanna tight to keep the velcro in place. That held for quite a while. When it finally started loosening up, we used a bungee cord.

    I still have a busted MSR Classic (actually they were called "Denali Lamas" at the time) in my basement... what exactly I'm saving it for I'm not sure. That happened on a Bonds attempt in March 2008? An ill-fated day, and the busted snowshoe was the least of my problems.

    I'm going to be more conscientious about carrying repair items. It's one thing to throw some odds and ends in your pack.... actually using it, far from the road on a cold day, really brings the lesson home.

  8. #23
    Senior Member MadRiver's Avatar
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    I just got back my Lightning Ascents from MSR in two weeks rather than the six week turnaround time. Instead of repairing my old ones, they sent me a new pair. One thing I will do differently is rather than aggressively kick step as I have done in the past, especially in icy conditions, is to let the shoes design do its job. If I put less force on the front crampon and allow the cross sections and the side sections to grip the ice/snow, I might reduce the force on the crampons and rivets. Im not suggesting that they shouldnt be redesigned, Im just saying since Im aware of certain design flaws, I should reduce the force that I normally apply to the shoe so as not to accelerate the metal fatigue.
    What do you mean he don't eat no meat? Ok, I'll do lamb.

  9. #24
    Senior Member JoeCedar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadRiver View Post
    I just got back my Lightning Ascents from MSR in two weeks rather than the six week turnaround time. Instead of repairing my old ones, they sent me a new pair. One thing I will do differently is rather than aggressively kick step as I have done in the past, especially in icy conditions, is to let the shoes design do its job. If I put less force on the front crampon and allow the cross sections and the side sections to grip the ice/snow, I might reduce the force on the crampons and rivets. Im not suggesting that they shouldnt be redesigned, Im just saying since Im aware of certain design flaws, I should reduce the force that I normally apply to the shoe so as not to accelerate the metal fatigue.
    While you are at it, you should also be very careful going downhill and sidehilling, particularly in crusty or icy conditions. I had a suspicion that these were the problematic conditions when mine broke several times.

    Come to think of it, you should always be careful with these high-strung, delicate snowshoes..........

  10. #25
    Senior Member MadRiver's Avatar
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    I might keep the box they came in just in case.
    What do you mean he don't eat no meat? Ok, I'll do lamb.

  11. #26
    Senior Member Lawn Sale's Avatar
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    Just keep them in the case, that way they won't get worn out.
    Appearances are not everything, it just looks like they are.




  12. #27
    Senior Member MadRiver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lawn Sale View Post
    Just keep them in the case, that way they won't get worn out.
    Hmmmm, no! Even with all the problems, I like my Ascents.
    What do you mean he don't eat no meat? Ok, I'll do lamb.

  13. #28
    Senior Member The Hikers's Avatar
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    Had to go check our Denali's after reading this thread. We've had them for four years, and the only wear I see is to the plastic cross-treads at the rear, probably from rocks . Only used the 8" tails once in deep snow and found it pretty clumsy. I DO love the "televators"

  14. #29
    Senior Member AOC-1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeCedar View Post
    While you are at it, you should also be very careful going downhill and sidehilling, particularly in crusty or icy conditions. I had a suspicion that these were the problematic conditions when mine broke several times.

    Come to think of it, you should always be careful with these high-strung, delicate snowshoes..........
    Yep, my LA's have broken 3 times in the same location - and each time I was sidehilling or going down. I now use the LA's only when snowshoes might be necessary, never when they clearly will be required gear. And when I do use them I take them off whenever and whereever possible.

  15. #30
    Senior Member Stash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blaze View Post
    Here's a shot of my friend's busted Tubbs snowshoe (on my foot) after some hasty, Rube Goldberg type field repairs, applied with very cold hands, on Saturday 1/9, just shy of the Zealand summit:



    While the snow was not brutally deep, it was still a bad place to have this happen. Nine miles from the road. And the snow was deep enough so that somebody would have hopped like Festus, expending considerable energy, all the way back to where we'd dropped our skis.

    I used some velcro straps, and knotted a bandanna tight to keep the velcro in place. That held for quite a while. When it finally started loosening up, we used a bungee cord.
    Blaze. What happened here. Heel strap broke but toe basket still in good shape? Did you get any results from Tubbs?
    Stash

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