Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 47

Thread: bike training

  1. #1
    Senior Member brianW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Evans, GA
    Posts
    718

    bike training

    Since many at VFTT also bike, I figured I would start a thread for it.

    I currently ride only mt bikes and get out 1-2 times a week for 15-25 miles each ride. I want to increase my speed/distance, What can I do. Most folks I know will do this via road bikes (don't have one) and riding pavement just sucks with knobby tires. Should I switch from riding singletrack to some forest service roads? Incoporate some sprints?

    Depending on the trail condition my average speed is form 9 - 13 mph. The wet muddy conditions really suck the speed out of you. My main goal is to finish the Sumter Metric Century in October with a time of 6-6.5 hours which will be an improvement of last years time of 7.5 hours. Last year was the first time I ever road further than 35 miles at once.
    " The more I study nature, the more I stand amazed at the work of the Creator" -Louis Pasteur

  2. #2
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    5,940
    First, you can get high-pressure slicks for your MTB which will increase your comfort on the road. Locking out the suspension will help too, if this is an option.

    Second, most hardcore MTB racers (not riders, racers) do a good chunk of their training on the road. What most road riders do is find a good group training ride as everybody pushes everybody else. Fire roads will allow you to ride at a higher consistent level than will riding single track.

    Third, you're going to have to get out for at least 3-4 hours at a stretch, at least once per week, increasing the time as the event date nears.

    Fourth, work your way upwards in intensity as well. This usually means intervals. One mental trick I learned for doing ITTs or intervals was to keep asking yourself "Can I go faster RIGHT NOW?"

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  3. #3
    Senior Member kaseri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    175
    Get a fixed gear bike and your legs will become iron.


  4. #4
    Senior Member HAMTERO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Somerville MA
    Posts
    390
    Get this book and do what it says. There is a mountain bike version as well.

    http://www.velopress.com/cycling.php?id=275
    "I'm on a permanent vacation"

    Don Sheldon

  5. #5
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    5,940
    Yes, an excellent book. I recently quoted from the 1996 edition in the "What the heck?" thread.

    As I read the OP, I'm not sure this is a race or that the JF methodology is warranted for the stated goal. It's pretty "deep" unless you are committed to racing for results.

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  6. #6
    Senior Member HAMTERO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Somerville MA
    Posts
    390
    I think you could use that book to set up a training plan for his 100k event. It would be scaled down for sure but the basics are the same.
    "I'm on a permanent vacation"

    Don Sheldon

  7. #7
    Senior Member IndianChris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Harbor Hill Moraine
    Posts
    679
    I currently ride only mt bikes and get out 1-2 times a week for 15-25 miles each ride. I want to increase my speed/distance, What can I do. Most folks I know will do this via road bikes (don't have one) and riding pavement just sucks with knobby tires. Should I switch from riding singletrack to some forest service roads? Incoporate some sprints?
    I replaced the knobby tires with road tires on one of my mountain bikes so that I could ride on the roads. It makes a huge difference.

    Riding the road bike gives you that opportunity to ride consistently for long periods of time at an elevated heart rate therefore increasing your aerobic endurance You don't really get that on the mountain bike trails, in my opinion. Yeah, your heart rate is up but not consistent for long periods of time.

    You will benefit greatly from road training for your longer mountain bike rides that you want to do.

    And btw...thanks for posting. Another reason to convince the powers that be to get that bike forum started.
    HEY!!!
    Don't take it for granite, it's a gneiss day.

  8. #8
    Senior Member jrichard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    New Hampshire Avatar: night noisemaker
    Posts
    246
    I dislike road bikes*.

    I use an unsuspended mountain bike for my commute, 30 miles round trip, on paved and gravel roads. My tires are fat boy slicks, pumped up to 100psi. The rest of my bike has standard mountain bike components, including SPD pedals.

    My commute average is about 16 mph. Not much faster than the OP.

    When I'm riding on the road, I raise the seat equal to or above the bars. I also tuck when I'm moving fast downhill.

    When climbing hills I use the mountain technique, preferring to get out of the saddle and muscle up the hill instead of spinning in a low gear. This technique is also more like a hiking climb.

    There are psychological components to riding a mountain bike on the road. 1) You need to get used to traffic. 2) Let the road bikes go, resist the urge to race them. They will usually win.


    All in all, riding a mountain bike on the road is like using telemark skis at a groomed resort. It's an acquired taste, not many others are doing it, and you'll probably feel a little out of place. But if it fits your needs, go for it!


    * Just my opinion. I don't want to be speedy like Lance Armstrong, I want to have fun. Road bikes are squirrelly on hilly fire roads. That said, I'm thinking about cyclocross.

  9. #9
    Senior Member brianW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Evans, GA
    Posts
    718
    Getting out for 3-4 hour stretches will not be an issue in a few weeks with the increase daylight. Also a local trail (Bartram trail, GA) is being extended and will be about 45 miles of singletrack round trip. Along with another trail system (Forks Area Trail System, SC) which has 35 miles of singletrack and about 15 miles of forest service roads. Great place to ride.

    Seems like I need to hit the dirt roads at least (but the singletrack is so fun) I'll look into the road slicks, maybe put them on my old Trek 830 so I don't have to switch them out.

    SS is one thing but I don't think I'll be riding a fixed on the trail. Could be a bit difficult over anything technical.
    " The more I study nature, the more I stand amazed at the work of the Creator" -Louis Pasteur

  10. #10
    Moderator Peakbagr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Near the Adirondack Blue Line
    Posts
    3,791
    After years off road and mountain bikes, I got another Mt bike last fall and combined it with heavy spinning classes.

    A couple of questions for the bike experts. I have my 30 year old road bike and now a new mountain bike. I can upgrade the road bike, but my thought was riding the mountain bike on roads would provide better workouts for the time available due to the suspension and the fat, soft tires providing more rolling resistence.

    There's a lot more traffic on the roads now from when I used to ride a lot, and a lot of the drivers aren't paying much attention to cyclists. I'm a little spooked to get back out on roads for long rides. If I have 1 to 2 hrs for a ride, does it make sense to work harder on a mt bike, or use the road bike faster?
    In the next couple of years there will be a 9 mile rail trail going in about 1/4 mile from our home. That should be a great assistance.
    "The fact that going off the deep end appears
    to be a requisite to doing anything of consequence
    in this life has not escaped me." Jim Harrison

  11. #11
    Senior Member una_dogger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Waltham, MA
    Posts
    4,518
    Quote Originally Posted by IndianChris View Post
    I replaced the knobby tires with road tires on one of my mountain bikes so that I could ride on the roads. It makes a huge difference.
    Agreed. I replaced the knobby's on my commuter bike (Giant Sedona MTB) and cut my commute time in half.

    http://www.rei.com/product/784581

    I'm sure there are many trains of thought on MTB vs Road cycling -- I personally feel I get a better workout on my road bike.

    Spinning classes in winter are an awesome way to train.

    *Someone on another thread was knocking spinning classes -- they must be talking before trying one -- they are hardcore interval and hill training, and allow you to use your clipless bike shoes. High cadence and low gear. Guess the name spinning makes it sound too easy for some. I highly recommend getting into a good quality spin class twice a week to help get ready for the cycling season.
    ADK 46'r NE115'r NEHH NH 48 x 6 NH48W NH 331/576
    Terra NH 48 x 6+ ~93/100 NEHH ~ ADK 35/46 ~RIP~
    Pemi NH4K~ Gem NH4K

  12. #12
    Member Tito Alba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    North Jersey
    Posts
    65
    I have a road bike, a F/S Mtn. bike, and a full rigid mtn bike with slicks.

    I wouldn't want to ride the rigid bike more than 25-30 miles. Just isn't fun after that.

    But to stretch out your goals, aside from all the prime advice offered above, develop a sound base of 20-25 milers and then shoot the works. It's mostly mental you'll find. And I'm mentaller than most.
    Suffer in silence. Complain with laughter

  13. #13
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    5,940
    Instead of overcoming rolling resistance of knobby tires, you can overcome wind resistance by going faster (on the road bike.) There is a time and place for a smooth, high-RPM cadence and another for lower, mashing/grinding style. Each rider has a method which suits them well. Lance Armstrong used to be a masher/grinder (low cadence) and after cancer and weight loss became more of a spinner and well you know what happened then

    Do what you like, however.

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  14. #14
    Senior Member brianW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Evans, GA
    Posts
    718
    Years of mt biking and I was a masher 'til about 1.5 years ago. Higher rpm at a lower gear does wonders and my legs like me more because of it.
    " The more I study nature, the more I stand amazed at the work of the Creator" -Louis Pasteur

  15. #15
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    5,940
    Quote Originally Posted by jrichard View Post
    That said, I'm thinking about cyclocross.
    Yum. Cyclocross!



    That will get your butt in shape!

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

Similar Threads

  1. Winter training
    By heathcliff in forum Q&A - New England
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 05-10-2017, 10:04 AM
  2. Crampon/Axe Training
    By Tuck in forum General Backcountry
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12-06-2014, 07:41 AM
  3. ice ax training
    By BethW in forum General Backcountry
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 11-30-2012, 08:22 AM
  4. Training Log
    By dr_wu002 in forum General Backcountry
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-19-2011, 08:07 AM
  5. Weight training
    By Adk_dib in forum General Backcountry
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 01-07-2009, 09:25 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •