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Thread: closed cell booties insulate light weight footwear for snowshoeing

  1. #1
    Senior Member Chip's Avatar
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    closed cell booties insulate light weight footwear for snowshoeing

    I saw these advertised and didn't know what to think. Some of you who love your light weight footwear might think they're a good idea. They look like they'd work with microspikes or similar. Personally I don't think they'd do much more than a good gaiter, but who knows. I do like and trust Crescent Moon.
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    Senior Member Paradox's Avatar
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    It appears that they would add an extra layer to the shoes upper, reminsient of "supergaitors". Except at $45 rather than $119
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    Senior Member KRobi's Avatar
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    My winter cycling booties look very similar (though not as thick), and they work fine mtn biking in winter. However, they do not work if you are not generating body heat (moving), so I would worry if something happened while hiking and you needed to wait, or were only able to move slowly. Then again I'm a "carry way more than you need", hiking
    Last edited by KRobi; 11-06-2010 at 09:32 AM.

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    I bought my partner boot gloves for her leather teleboots years ago. they definitely added warmth. But I wonder if the added weight defeats the purpose of wearing light hikers. Using an insulated boot would probably be lighter than a light boot + the bootie warmer.

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    Senior Member Chip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelb View Post
    Using an insulated boot would probably be lighter than a light boot + the bootie warmer.
    But maybe about the same weight at a lower over-all cost ? Especially if you don't want to wear anything other than your 3 season shoe/boot.
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    Senior Member ferrisjrf's Avatar
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    I used a pair for much of last winter, and will do so again this winter.

    They're perhaps 100x warmer than a simple gaiter would be. I'd imagine that there are troves of information out there regarding the insulative properties of 6mm neoprene.

    The only disadvantage I've found is that you don't really want to bareboot with them. Luckily for me, I rarely bareboot in the winter unless I'm running down well-packed trails on my way out of the mountains...in which case my feet are always plenty warm anyway, and I just take off the booties and go.

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    Senior Member dr_wu002's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferrisjrf View Post
    I used a pair for much of last winter, and will do so again this winter.

    They're perhaps 100x warmer than a simple gaiter would be. I'd imagine that there are troves of information out there regarding the insulative properties of 6mm neoprene.

    The only disadvantage I've found is that you don't really want to bareboot with them. Luckily for me, I rarely bareboot in the winter unless I'm running down well-packed trails on my way out of the mountains...in which case my feet are always plenty warm anyway, and I just take off the booties and go.
    I tore them up wearing them with microspikes. I think they say somewhere to only wear them with snowshoes. I figured Microspikes would be ok but they weren't...

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    Member Tito Alba's Avatar
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    That was my first thought too. That they would get tore up. Especially the way the toe area fits in the pic. That would rub against my MSRs.

    I use these kind of boots for winter road cycling and wouldn't go without them. Don't have the same inclination seeing these.
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    Senior Member paul ron's Avatar
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    6mill neoprene is the same material used for wet suits. Kayaking shoes n socks are just as good then. I only see one problem, they will keep moisture in and not let the boot breath as well.
    Last edited by paul ron; 11-09-2010 at 11:44 AM.

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    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul ron View Post
    6mill neoprene is the same material used for wet suits. Kayaking shoes n socks are just as good then. I only see one problem, they will keep moisture in and not let the boot breath as well.
    Wet suit material (neoprene foam) is also not very abrasion resistant, as noticed by dr_wu002.

    Neoprene socks worn over a very thin liner would act like vapor-barrier socks.

    Also, neoprene foam socks are disrecommended for use at altitude--they can expand in the lower air pressure.

    Doug

  11. #11
    Senior Member ferrisjrf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dr_wu002 View Post
    I tore them up wearing them with microspikes.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tito Alba View Post
    That was my first thought too. That they would get tore up. Especially the way the toe area fits in the pic. That would rub against my MSRs.
    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul View Post
    Wet suit material (neoprene foam) is also not very abrasion resistant, as noticed by dr_wu002.
    The only time I noticed any significant abrasion was while using my MSRs, kicking steps in crusty March snow as we headed up Owl's Head slide at 5AM. Otherwise, I didn't have any issues...at least not any issues that you wouldn't have with any lightweight footwear.

    YMMV, though. I don't hike much, once it gets cold.

  12. #12
    Junior Member daLunartik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferrisjrf View Post
    The only time I noticed any significant abrasion was while using my MSRs, kicking steps in crusty March snow as we headed up Owl's Head slide at 5AM.
    That would make sense, since they are intended to be used with the Cresent Moon snowshoes - which if I remember correctly, have a binding that cradles the entire foot. With Cresent Moon's on, the toe of your boots aren't exposed like they are with the MSR bindings.

    Never liked the Cresent Moon bindings, the few times I borrowed a pair, but the ratchet system is pretty nifty.
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