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Thread: NH trailhead vandalism

  1. #1
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    NH trailhead vandalism

    passed by Nineteen Mile Brook trailhead this morning and saw what looked like broken windows. News tonite confirmed it. Very sad!! WMUR report

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    Pfff, that's too bad. What a great way to ruin a weekend in the woods. If that ever happened to my car, man, I'd go totally ape. Chances of actually catching people like this is what, slim? When my mother's car got hit like this, it was a non-event for the police (understandably so, I think). Maybe others disagree.

    Just goes to show, don't leave expensive gear in the car when you decide you don't need it... and to think of the times I've left my wallet in the glovebox up at those trailheads...

  3. #3
    Sherpa John
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    Should always keep your wallet on you fr identification in case anything unfortunate happened to you... I suppose you could also just carry your license. Ho Hum.. DAMN VANDALS!

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    Senior Member 1ADAM12's Avatar
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    Yes this is to bad. I can remember when South Meadows, The Garden, and Roostercomb trailheads in the Adirondacks were hit pretty bad a few years ago. I actually remember reading some threads about it here on VFTT before the crash
    "undefined Wilderness areas are first of all a series of sanctuaries for the primitive arts of wilderness travel, especially canoeing and packing.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sherpa John
    Should always keep your wallet on you fr identification in case anything unfortunate happened to you... I suppose you could also just carry your license. Ho Hum.. DAMN VANDALS!
    License I keep, wallet stays (every ounce counts!).

  6. #6
    Senior Member Artex's Avatar
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    Hopefully they'll get nabbed. Have those digital cameras ready at the trailheads and get a picture of the vandal's license plate numbers. You never know when you'll stumble across them in the act. I realize the chances are slim, but hey, imagine the satisfaction of busting the scumbags!

  7. #7
    Senior Member bobmak's Avatar
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    My cars have been broken into twice over the years in the WMNF. 19 Mile Brook, Appalachia and Zealand have all been prime spots for break ins in the past.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Jay H's Avatar
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    I always keep my keys and wallets (even credit cards and cash) when I'm out hiking or backpacking.. I'm just used to it. I have friends who will stash their car keys under the tires and stuff like that but I usually just pack mine with them. I know if I ever wanted a ride, I could always count on my friend's keys under the tire! So far, I have managed to keep from playing a cruel joke though on him...

    Jay
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    Through every briar and bramble
    Till your life is in a shambles
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    This sucks. On the basis of this news, I am going to keep comprehensive insurance on my vehicle. But I'll have to stash some plastic sheets and duct tape for the ride home....

    Do any of these people ever get caught?,,,,I mean has anyone ever seen anything in the local police blotter column?

  10. #10
    Senior Member Puma concolor's Avatar
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    Unfortunately, the solvability rate on this type of crime is relatively low - particularly if it is an isolated incident. With no witnesses, the police basically have nothing to go on. I've done a good deal of police work in both the Dacks and Catskills and have investigated a bunch of these in the past. Generally, I'll speak with anyone in the area when called out and then write down the plate numbers of cars in the lot and do my best to contact the owner. But the car owners are usually hikers who are deep in the woods when the crime occurs so UNLESS it is a bunch of kids who subsequently shoot their mouth off to the wrong person or you catch them in the act, you're generally out of luck. Prints aren't done for low level crime. So make sure your insurance is good and be sure to get a police case number.

    Other suggestions would include writing down serial numbers for all your electronics equipment. We can enter serial numbers in a nationwide database so that if some cop in Montana pulls over someone and is suspicious about the 17 digital cameras in the backseat, the cop can do an "article" search on the suspected items. The only way it will get in the database is if you keep the numbers handy and provide them to the cop if your car or home is ever broken into. Also, never leave credit cards in your car. If you're out for a five day hike in the Pemi wilderness and have the card stolen on day one, the bad guy has a whole lot of time to charge a whole lot of stuff to your card. Of course, a lot of this is common sense but people who haven't been "hit" before generally don't think about crime in terms of prevention. And remember, cops aren't magicians ... we can only work with what we have.

    And no, I don't know climber456.
    Last edited by Mark S; 11-28-2004 at 05:24 PM.

  11. #11
    Senior Member amstony's Avatar
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    Manchester Union Leader and the Globe New Hampshire edition had small columns on it. Apparently it was a pretty sizeable operation. Trailheads along Rt 2 and Pinkham Notch got hit.

    I always carry my wallet and keys, and put my car papers into the trunk. I'd rather deal with carrying the extra weight than the nightmare of having to get your new license, credit cards, etc etc.

  12. #12
    jade
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    I hiked up the Roaring Brook Trail (Mt Greylock, Western MA) a week back.....there were a number of other cars in the parking area. When I returned, one of the vehicles had its back window smashed in. I took photos of it and the other cars. The saddest thing was that there was a child' car seat and toys in plain view and it had NY plates.

    The local police didn't seem interested in following through with an investigation....

  13. #13

    extra weight -- I wish!

    Quote Originally Posted by amstony
    I always carry my wallet and keys... I'd rather deal with carrying the extra weight....
    My wallet is, if anything, too light.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    Hey Bobmak, which lots did you get hit in? My initial thought is that lots close to the road offer easy quick targets for window smashing but too much traffic to rummage through cars looking for goodies, if they do that they may get caught sooner than later. Lots like the Rocky Branch lot off 16, Zealand & the others on USFS dirt roads offer greater privacy for piracy.
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Stan's Avatar
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    By police standards this may be low level crime but when it happens to you it is pretty high level. I suggest we have the necessary ingredients here to attempt to do something about it.

    First, we're all probably pissed off, even when it happens to someone else.
    Second, we have a pretty diverse group of skills and imagination.
    Third, we have a quick and comprehensive communication and data link right here at our fingertips.

    It would be good to research some comprehensive facts in order to focus on the time(s) and place(s) these things usually happen. Then, having some measure of predictability, it would enable us to focus our energy and technical capacity on preventing and solving these acts and perhaps exacting retribution.

    What say you with some technical and forensic skills and a little time to share?

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