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Thread: Hiking Food Suggestions for Winter, Above Treeline

  1. #16
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    Logan Bread
    Peanut butter filled Pretzels [really like the CVS brand]
    Peanut M&Ms
    Thermos of Lipton noodle soup

  2. #17
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadRiver View Post
    I actually put my snacks in the Nalgene cozies with a hand warmer at the bottom.
    Interesting, I assume that gives enough airflow for the hand warmers to function. Thanks for the tip!
    Tom Rankin
    Volunteer Balsam Lake Mountain
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  3. #18
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NH Tramper View Post
    I am thinking about getting a couple of those insulated cozies, though I do worry I won't like them hanging like that.
    Tim and I have discussed this while on the trail. I told him it would not work well for bushwhacking, or very narrow trails that sometimes are the case in Winter. But he has not had any problems with it.
    Tom Rankin
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  4. #19
    Senior Member TEO's Avatar
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    I've been using traditional GORP (Raisins, honey-roasted peanuts, & dark chocolate M&Ms) for years, it's much more palatable than Clif bars or the like, and cheaper.

    Last winter I started making (whole wheat) wraps w/salami slices (Abruzzi or Sopressata), Herbes de Provence (sprinkle liberally on meat & cheese), and slices of Cabot cheese (Seriously Sharp Cheddar, Pepper Jack, or Habenero Cheddar). Very yummy and compact.

    In the late fall & winter I carry a thermos of hot tea with lots of honey or Vermont Maple Syrup.

    The ultimate energy-to-weight food is olive oil. Just take a nips out of a bottle. Some people flavor it with garlic salt or other ingredients.

  5. #20
    Senior Member erugs's Avatar
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    For winter hikes, I cut my Nutella or Almond Butter sandwiches into long strips. If they get frozen, they are bite-width, so are easier to eat. A friend has carried bite-sized bagel pieces along with bite-size cheese in a baggie, which seems to work well, too.
    Ellen

    Volunteer Maintainer: East Pond Trail

    "Through winter-time we call on spring/And through the spring on summer call/And when abounding hedges ring/Declare that winter's best of all/And after that there's nothing good/Because the spring-time has not come... William Butler Yeats

  6. #21
    Senior Member Sunshine Chris's Avatar
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    I like to eat cinnamon raisin bagels with alot of peanut butter on it and a little jam for a snack or lunch. I use the zip lock bag it's wrapped in to hold onto it so it's not messy to eat with gloves on.

  7. #22
    Senior Member Ed'n Lauky's Avatar
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    When I hike with Lauky in the winter I have to keep moving. He does fine with the cold when walking but gets cold quickly when stopped so I basically don't stop. I had to figure out a way to eat and I came up with the idea of drinking Boost. I actually use Boost Plus for the extra calories. I carry several with me. I start a bit before noon and take one an hour. Depending on the length of the hike I might take one to four. I can open one and drink it in less than a minute. Quite a bit less, actually. I've found that I feel the effects much faster than with solid food. It worked so well for me in the winter I now use it year round.
    I used to look at my dog and think 'If you were a little smarter you could tell me what your were thinking', and he'd look at me like he was saying 'If you were a little smarter I wouldn't have to'. Fred Jungclaus

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  8. #23
    Senior Member Little Rickie's Avatar
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    I find loading up too much on high energy fats isn't as good as a mix as 50% carbs and fats or so. Some of my fats come from protein sources, cheese, peanut butter, sussage and jerky. Proteins help keep me warm too. Everything is kept small/bite size and rotated into a warm pocket for a while before eating.

    When I do snack I sit down (5-10 min) on something insulating (bubble wrap or dense foam)my bottom and or back. I need the rest every hour or so and take the opportunity to snack and drink at the same time.

    If I don't snack hourly I will bonk.
    Last edited by Little Rickie; 11-14-2012 at 11:11 AM.
    Peace

    "How one parses a question tells you as much about the person as how they answer the question."

    Oldee Won Balogeena

  9. #24
    Senior Member hikerbrian's Avatar
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    Bacon.

    You're welcome.
    Sure. Why not.

  10. #25
    Moderator bikehikeskifish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Rankin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by NH Tramper View Post
    I am thinking about getting a couple of those insulated cozies, though I do worry I won't like them hanging like that.
    Tim and I have discussed this while on the trail. I told him it would not work well for bushwhacking, or very narrow trails that sometimes are the case in Winter. But he has not had any problems with it.
    First, I like the snack bottle idea enough that I use it even in the summer, and even when bushwhacking. I don't find it snags on things.

    Second, I had concerns about the bottle cozies as well - BUT in practice, they really are not in the way - not bouncing around and not being hit by poles or hands while moving. They slide right up the strap, open quickly, drink, and return without really breaking pace. Put the snack bottle above the 2nd cozy and then you are eating from one side and drinking from the other (swapping the empty/full bottles when necessary). Hanging cozies outboard like this gives me more room in my pack for other things. I've used them in summer when playing "Sherpa Dad" (carrying extra clothes for both kids.)

    Neither the snack bottle nor the cozies seem at all snag-prone - there isn't really anything to catch on them, except for the loops, which are already on the strap and in tight to my pack/body.

    Tim
    Bike, Hike, Ski, Sleep. Eat, Fish, Repeat.

  11. #26
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Rickie View Post
    When I do snack I sit down (5-10 min) on something insulating (bubble wrap or dense foam)my bottom and or back. I need the rest every hour or so and take the opportunity to snack and drink at the same time.

    If I don't snack hourly I will bonk.
    Ideally, one's food and water is prepared and carried (eg in a pocket) so that one can eat and drink on the run or during a short pause--people cool down during longer stops. (For long stops you have to get out your down jackets to stay warm and repack them before starting. Wastes a lot of time.) You also don't want to eat so much at a single stop that it interferes with getting going again.

    I adopted an eat and drink every hour protocol when BC skiing. It also works well when hiking.


    BTW, there are a number of prior threads on winter food: search on "food" or "winter food".

    Doug

  12. #27
    Senior Member Snowflea's Avatar
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    There's nothing like hot Campbell's tomato soup on a cold hike. Also herb teas with a bit of sugar. Sometimes I bring both--the extra weight is worth it.

    Second the vote for Cabot cheeses which are good even if partially frozen.

    Snickers bars are always a winner.

  13. #28
    Senior Member Little Rickie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DougPaul View Post
    ) so that one can eat and drink on the run or during a short pause--people cool down during longer stops. Doug
    Long time no read.

    It takes me between 5-10 min to feel the chill and then I'm off. The frequent breaks helps me pace a long day.
    Peace

    "How one parses a question tells you as much about the person as how they answer the question."

    Oldee Won Balogeena

  14. #29
    Senior Member Dave Bear's Avatar
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    Eye-of-the-round steak, chicken tenders or pork loins! Grilled but not chilled!
    The heart of the journey is in the path not the peak!

  15. #30
    Senior Member WinterWarlock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Bear View Post
    Eye-of-the-round steak, chicken tenders or pork loins! Grilled but not chilled!
    There ya go! And a little nip of something to wash it down?

    For me, cheeses are great, along with jerky. Ramen noodles in a small food flask can be good. Depends on the hike and the conditions, sometimes it's good to set a spell and heat up some water and make some bouillon or something...the salt is ever so tasty. And sandwiches, but more likely to be peanut butter, banana and honey...
    The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over.

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