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Thread: Edmunds Col Fatality

  1. #16
    Senior Member CaptCaper's Avatar
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    All points taken and I know this.. And I'm sure the Lt. knows this. But his job is to preach safety. An old time Mariner said to me once. " I don't care what anyone says.. I can tell you if you stay out on the Ocean long enough it will get you". Of course hiking solo in the higher summits in the Winter increase's the odds. I still can't get use to all the hikers that bite it over the winter year in and out for one reason or another.
    I haven't hiked up there in the Winter but I don't think Micro Spikes would cut it. Someone just gave a trip report on a hike and said he switched to Alpine Crampons of the Grivel 10 or 12 point type as the Micro's didn't cut it for the conditions.

  2. #17
    Senior Member Tom Rankin's Avatar
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    Yes, we've discussed the 'alone' question before. And other similar questions.

    Above tree line, winter, alone, night time, 'go light', bushwhacking, etc., (not saying this guy did all of these), all have their risks. They also have their rewards.
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  3. #18
    Member MikeM's Avatar
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    Just back from 2 nights at Gray Knob. The caretaker was involved with the removal. He brought a litter up to the col to meet the other responders. I have never seen so much ice. The Lowes path from Gray knob to the log cabin looks more like a frozen waterfall than a trail. If I'm out in similiar conditions in the future I would include a helmet in my gear list

  4. #19
    Senior Member KV's Avatar
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    From his facebook page. Doesn't say much, but makes it more personal and not simply a statistic:
    The family of Tim Hallock is sad to share this news.
    Timothy George Hallock passed into eternity last week at the age of 54 doing what he loved, winter mountaineering. Born June 17, 1961 in Huntington, N.Y., Tim’s life journey as a sea captain and a mountain guide (trail name, “Yeti”) took him to some of the nation’s highest mountain peaks as well as logging over a million miles as a licensed Ship’s Officer on any tonnage vessel on all oceans. Tim graduated Southold High School and the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point. In the recent past, he served as President of NYSOGA (New York State Outdoor Guides Association.) Tim was passionate about many things, mostly God’s creation and our place in it, and family. Tim was the beloved son of Sue Hallock and Dan Hallock: the cherished brother of Dan (Emily), Jen, Matt, Charles (Cara), and Susan; the doting, encouraging and generous-hearted uncle of Julianne, Justin, Sarah, Matty, Angie, Brian, Zach, Desirae, Stephen, Danny, Maeryn and Hannah, and blessed with numerous aunts, uncles and cousins. He was a devoted friend and acquaintance to many others as he worked, played and lived life to the full. Tim’s motto was “LIVE LIFE LIKE YOU MEAN IT.” Tim’s recent experiences are chronicled on his website, northeastmountainguides.com, and two Facebook pages HALLOCK’S MARINE SERVICES and NORTHEAST MOUNTAIN GUIDES.
    Life is a trip. Pack Accordingly.

  5. #20
    Member MikeM's Avatar
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    This Mariner was certified to pilot any vessel in any sea. He was a decision maker who evaluated risk and chose a course of action. I think he was as or more capable than many of us. I'm slow to put on traction, maybe it is a short bad stretch and it will get better. Then with microspikes on I often delay to put on full crampons. One slip is all it takes.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
    Just back from 2 nights at Gray Knob. The caretaker was involved with the removal. He brought a litter up to the col to meet the other responders. I have never seen so much ice. The Lowes path from Gray knob to the log cabin looks more like a frozen waterfall than a trail. If I'm out in similiar conditions in the future I would include a helmet in my gear list
    I was up Lowe's to Gray Knob Feb. 5-7. It was my 5th full winter hike up there. This was the most difficult. Almost no snow, and very big ice and rock to negotiate, at about Log Cabin, and above. Crampons were dulled early on the way up due to constant rock, and on the way down, did not bite the ice enough. I have learned to wear a climbing helmet for that route, and will carry one of those short ice climbing axes in the future to get up bulges on the trail, and maybe a short piece of rope for assisting others in the group.

  7. #22
    Senior Member Ed'n Lauky's Avatar
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    This link was posted on Facebook this morning: http://www.unionleader.com/apps/pbcs...864&source=RSS
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  8. #23
    Senior Member richard's Avatar
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    [ I'm slow to put on traction, maybe it is a short bad stretch and it will get better. Then with microspikes on I often delay to put on full crampons. One slip is all it takes.[/QUOTE]

    TRUE. I found out the hard way.

  9. #24
    Senior Member CaptCaper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by psyculman View Post
    I was up Lowe's to Gray Knob Feb. 5-7. It was my 5th full winter hike up there. This was the most difficult. Almost no snow, and very big ice and rock to negotiate, at about Log Cabin, and above. Crampons were dulled early on the way up due to constant rock, and on the way down, did not bite the ice enough. I have learned to wear a climbing helmet for that route, and will carry one of those short ice climbing axes in the future to get up bulges on the trail, and maybe a short piece of rope for assisting others in the group.
    Extra crampons for the way down it seems as well. or a file.. this was a season for ice since early on.

  10. #25
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    The last article link says he died of hypothermia. I see a lot of references to helmets and other equipment. Did I miss something? Did he have a fall that incapacitated him or did he just succumb to the elements?
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 6/46

  11. #26
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    DayTrip, I imagine the autopsy will tell us about any injuries or medical events. I believe the gear remarks were only hikers discussing what would be needed for the conditions at the time.

  12. #27
    Senior Member dug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayTrip View Post
    The last article link says he died of hypothermia. I see a lot of references to helmets and other equipment. Did I miss something? Did he have a fall that incapacitated him or did he just succumb to the elements?
    I think there are assumptions (mine, too), that he slipped or fell, and then became incapacitated and became hypothermic from there.

  13. #28
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richard View Post
    [ I'm slow to put on traction, maybe it is a short bad stretch and it will get better. Then with microspikes on I often delay to put on full crampons. One slip is all it takes.
    TRUE. I found out the hard way.[/QUOTE]

    I fortunately (or unfortunately I guess - dislocated my shoulder) learned this lesson early on in my Winter hiking too. I don't understand why people are so resistant to wearing crampons versus spikes or barebooting vs microspikes, etc. It's like it is some sort of macho thing to try to get by with the least amount of gear or something. I don't get it. I use my crampons quite often and don't really care what people think of it. If I'm on any kind of moderate to steep grade where my overall hiking speed would be no different in spikes I far prefer the crampons. So much more secure. You can just walk right up and down the fall line confidently. And when there is a a few inches or more of powder they are way more reliable for grip. I even prefer them over snowshoes (to a point) because you don't have the deck and other parts angling your feet, sliding and catching on rocks and roots, especially in steep scratchy spots. Other than fairly flat grades crampons for me are my preferred traction option, especially descending. I've worn crampons more this year than I ever have and find I really prefer in most conditions and wonder why I haven't been doing this right along other than the public perception that "you wear spikes because you don't need crampons".

    I also bought a climbing helmet early in my Winter hiking (which honestly was an over reaction to a very icy descent I made and some prodding about it from my wife). I haven't actually worn yet but carry it on the steeper hikes just in case. That is another item that seems like a no brainer to have that you almost never see anyone wearing unless they're actual ice climbers. If nothing else the foam insulates your head and keeps you warm and if you should happen to slip could save your life.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 6/46

  14. #29
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Creag Nan Drochaid View Post
    DayTrip, I imagine the autopsy will tell us about any injuries or medical events. I believe the gear remarks were only hikers discussing what would be needed for the conditions at the time.
    The article did say the autopsy result was that it was hypothermia but did not reference any other injuries. That is why I though I missed something. With the level of experience this guy had it would seem highly unlikely he just fell victim to hypothermia without some other contributing factors.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 6/46

  15. #30
    Senior Member hikerbrian's Avatar
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    I haven't seen any articles that indicate a fall was involved. If that were a factor in his death, the associated trama would be exceedingly obvious and I'd be amazed if that information was not released alongside the eventual cause of death (hypothermia). But I suppose stranger things have happenned.

    I also have not seen any estimated time of death. Could he have succomed over President's day weekend, the last really cold spell?

    Finally, it seems like lately we've seen a lot of rescues of inexperienced/incompetent hikers, and deaths of really accomplished and skilled mountaineers. That's something for us old salts to think about (if I may put myself in that category).
    Sure. Why not.

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