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Thread: Bears Ears National Monument

  1. #1
    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    Bears Ears National Monument

    http://bearsears.patagonia.com/

    America’s newest national monument, Bears Ears, is under political threat at the moment. Patagonia has made an interactive website, there’s a brief video at the start, and then you enter the website, go through another brief video, and then Section 2 has features on climbing, cycling and trail running. Tommy Caldwell does one of them, and while he is talking, you can get a 360 view of the climb. The video of Luke Nelson's run is incredible. Then there’s a section to take action.

    If you enjoy the website, I highly recommend the most recent episode of The Dirtbag Diaries, which is also about Bears Ears. http://dirtbagdiaries.com/endangered-spaces-bears-ears/


    Brian

  2. #2
    Senior Member Barkingcat's Avatar
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    It's not just Bears Ears National Monument -- it's also Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument (a favorite hiking/canyoneering spot of ours), for which a reduction of 75% of the area has been approved by the various counties involved, as well as by the state, in order to open up the land further for mining (coal) and cattle grazing.

    The legality of rescinding national monument designation, or reducing the land encompassed, is up for debate. Expect to see this going on for some time.

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    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    Patagonia spent $80,000 on lobbying last year, Exxon spent $11m. The link I posted above has drawn attention as the very model of grassroots mobilization. If you haven't had the opportunity to go to it yet, I encourage you to do so.

    http://m.startribune.com/outdoors-co...nds/418701603/

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    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    It's more than just Bears Ears. The new Katahdin Woods and Waters is also up for review, which means it could be opened for lumbering or any other range of activities.

    "Trump’s order also targets the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah, created by Clinton in 1996, and Katahdin Woods and Waters in Maine, created last year by Obama. At 87,500 acres, Katahdin is the only one of the 22 monuments under review that is smaller than 100,000 acres, the minimum size designated by the order.

    The Interior Department said Katahdin will be reviewed under a provision that singles out whether a monument was created or expanded without adequate public outreach and coordination with relevant stakeholders. The land east of Maine’s Baxter State Park was bought by Burt’s Bees co-founder Roxanne Quimby, whose foundation donated it to the federal government."

    http://talkingpointsmemo.com/news/in...onal-monuments

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    Sounds a bit like the reaction in Fairbanks when Kenai Peninsula Nation Park was proposed. https://www.nps.gov/kefj/learn/histo...ry-of-kefj.pdf

    Page 62, if you're curious.

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    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    Greetings all,

    This is the last day of the comment period for Bears Ears National Monument. If you have two minutes, please follow this link and send a comment to Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. Patagonia has an auto-filled message, and all you need to do is fill out your name and contact info, or just write sentences and speak from the heart.

    http://bearsears.patagonia.com/take-...=&utm_content=

    This is quite literally the last chance to do something to protect this amazing National Monument.

    Thanks,

    Brian
    Last edited by B the Hiker; 05-25-2017 at 11:14 AM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Raven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B the Hiker View Post

    http://bearsears.patagonia.com/take-...=&utm_content=

    This is quite literally the last chance to do something to protect this amazing National Monument.

    Thanks,

    Brian
    I'm in. A few minutes well spent. Maybe someone else will be inspired.

    I am Spartacus!
    Humankind has not woven the web of life.
    We are but one thread within it.
    Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.
    All things are bound together.
    All things connect.
    ~ Chief Seattle, 1854 ~

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    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    If you would like to donate to a Bears Ears legal defense fund, this is the site for the main named plaintiff:
    http://utahdinebikeyah.org/

    If you have any doubts about its legitimacy, you can verify via Outside Magazine:
    https://www.outsideonline.com/226838...ment-reduction

    Brian

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    President Biden not only restored Bears Ears National Monument this week, but he even expanded it!
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/07/c...sultPosition=1

    I haven't been yet. I've heard it's pretty magnificent.

  10. #10
    Senior Member CaptCaper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B the Hiker View Post
    http://bearsears.patagonia.com/

    America’s newest national monument, Bears Ears, is under political threat at the moment. Patagonia has made an interactive website, there’s a brief video at the start, and then you enter the website, go through another brief video, and then Section 2 has features on climbing, cycling and trail running. Tommy Caldwell does one of them, and while he is talking, you can get a 360 view of the climb. The video of Luke Nelson's run is incredible. Then there’s a section to take action.

    If you enjoy the website, I highly recommend the most recent episode of The Dirtbag Diaries, which is also about Bears Ears. http://dirtbagdiaries.com/endangered-spaces-bears-ears/


    Brian
    These land areas are so huge no one gets back country to witness any mining,etc. Bears Ears is just a small part of that area and will have no impact on it. That is why they are or did take the land for use. Utah and the usa needs those resources and no harm is done taking them. Utah especially is mostly open land and it effects them big time. That is why many there want land control back to the state.
    To me it's just extreme enviromentists with scare tactics that are way off in their thinking.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Mike P.'s Avatar
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    It would be nice if they could come to some agreement, Was this part of the property that was just given back? Will it be changed in 2024 or 2028? If they need bigger parking lots in the ADK and Whites, in some places they do (they are coming whether they are built or not) do you take Public land and develop it or already developed land that isn't being used. I have to think some banks own some of the Twin Mountain landscape due to foreclosures. Could the Rooster Comb lot on 73 be made bigger? A better structured and bigger lot at the HPIC or a lot at the end of South Meadow Road?
    Have fun & be safe
    Mike P.

  12. #12
    Senior Member B the Hiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCaper View Post
    Utah especially is mostly open land and it effects them big time. That is why many there want land control back to the state.
    This was so enlightening! You believe the U.S. Government should give control back to the people from there.

    There are some who would agree with you, such as Angelo Baca, cultural resources coordinator for Utah Diné Bikéyah. Outside Magazine reached out to him and Tommy Caldwell for their thoughts on what to do now with Bears Ears.

    Baca writes (in part):
    How can we engage with Indigenous communities on respectful and equal grounds? How can we develop a meaningful and authentic relationship to the landscape and the Indigenous peoples it belongs to? How can we utilize our resources, privilege, and power to lift up marginalized communities of color, especially Indigenous communities, to rectify historical traumas? This is the next great adventure, the next evolution in conservation and restorative justice on a social and cultural level, an action to match intention among those who love our lands and want to do right by them.

    If we want to make real and substantive change, we have to make life more just and equitable for everyone. In no other place is that more obvious than in nature, where diversity is prominent, showing us what a vibrant and healthy ecosystem looks like.

    Indigenous peoples see themselves and the land as one. Each cannot be separated from the other; if you see the landscape, then you see me; if you see me, then you see my landscape. This is what a real land acknowledgment looks like.

    Caldwell writes (in part):
    “Don’t stand over me like a white man, please sit down.”

    Ida Yellowman’s bluntness made me both squirm and smile. It’s refreshing to be around someone who tells it like it is. But it’s not comfortable knowing that people who look like me, think like me, and talk like me have been stealing from Ida’s people for more than 200 years. As a professional rock climber, I always thought my intimacy with land was deep—my life often depends on that closeness. But for Ida, and the five tribes of Hopi, Zuni, Ute, Ute Mountain Ute, and Diné, their entire cultural and spiritual heritage is written in this landscape. I’ve come to believe our ideas of public land ownership have been misguided.

    We, as an outdoor community, need to look to our Indigenous teachers, people like Angelo Baca and Ida Yellowman. We need to hold the knowledge in our minds that we are visitors to their ancestral and cultural lands and behave as such. And then we need to join them in the continued work to preserve this incredible place. The redesignation of the monument is a big step forward, but its continued protection will rely on our ability to understand and respect its original stewards.

    https://www.outsideonline.com/cultur...ource=facebook

  13. #13
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    It saddens me what the white man has done to the native peoples in this country. I've been traveling to Arizona to live for the Winter and visiting historic sites along RT66. We've been listening to "I bury my heart at Wounded Knee" on Audible. Traveling the lands of the history gives me a new appreciation of the first peoples way of life and a disgust for our historical "leaders". Earlier this Summer we traveled the Nez Perce trail, the Lolo Highway and Lewis and Clark trail. The Heart of the Monster made my skin tingle. I could feel the energy in the area. The greed of white men has no boundaries.

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