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Thread: Banner Year For Ticks??

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by iAmKrzys View Post
    I use permethrin and I have witnessed several ticks crawl up on my clothing only to get paralyzed and fall off within minutes. It's not a scientific study but good enough for me. I have not found a tick attached to me since I started using permethrin.
    Ditto.

    I have two cats. No ill effects from permethrin trated clothes, but they are sealed off from the drying process.

  2. #17
    Member Greenmountaingoat's Avatar
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    At this time of the year I stick to the low elevation walking trails (near where we live in Essex VT). Two years ago I had a total of 6 on me (none attached) from one walk on an old woods road that's not heavily used. Last year nothing but this year I've removed one that hadn't attached and one that had from my neck. What a pain in the...neck.

    So informal assessment is that it's worse than last year but the spring season isn't over yet.
    NH 31/48 ADK 26/46 NE 65/115

  3. #18
    Senior Member Jazzbo's Avatar
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    I think number of ticks is partly related to natural environments one travels through. Last summer I took wife and son on nice easy hike up to scenic knob in Ashland NH called Whitten Woods. I thought they would love it as trails are maintained mostly grassy with very easy footing. On way down we started seeing ticks on our socks and when we got back to camp we started picking ticks off like crazy easily 15-20. Grass is definitely bad news. I had same experience walking on a trail going across a grassy meadow. I did 8 mile bushwhack at 2000-2400' elevation through combo of open hardwoods, birch glades, and thick spruce - not a single tick. Of course spring hasn't really kicked in at tht elevation. Monday was warmer and I had to traverse some brushy clear cuts on west slope of Mount Carr and had two ticks to show for it. Temperate forest lands of southern New England I think it is best to stay on the trail. They also seem to be at their peak during spring. Based on previous comments I think I will definitely look into getting some permethrin.
    On #67 of NE67
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  4. #19
    Senior Member DougPaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzbo View Post
    I think number of ticks is partly related to natural environments one travels through. Last summer I took wife and son on nice easy hike up to scenic knob in Ashland NH called Whitten Woods. I thought they would love it as trails are maintained mostly grassy with very easy footing. On way down we started seeing ticks on our socks and when we got back to camp we started picking ticks off like crazy easily 15-20. Grass is definitely bad news. I had same experience walking on a trail going across a grassy meadow. I did 8 mile bushwhack at 2000-2400' elevation through combo of open hardwoods, birch glades, and thick spruce - not a single tick. Of course spring hasn't really kicked in at tht elevation. Monday was warmer and I had to traverse some brushy clear cuts on west slope of Mount Carr and had two ticks to show for it. Temperate forest lands of southern New England I think it is best to stay on the trail. They also seem to be at their peak during spring. Based on previous comments I think I will definitely look into getting some permethrin.
    Tick survival is higher for warmer winters or winters with a good snow cover (better insulation for them).

    Blacklegged ticks (the carrier of Lyme disease, also known as deer ticks) can get you any time of year, but peak in the spring/early summer and the fall/late summer (they need blood meals at two different stages in their development). The only time that you are safe is when there is snow cover and/or it is below freezing. (I've heard two versions: when there is snow cover or when it is below freezing. Given my uncertainty, I only consider myself safe when both conditions are met.)

    Blacklegged ticks are blind and sit on grasses and low foliage to wait for you to come by. When they feel the vibration of your approach, they reach out and wave their forelegs, hoping to snag you as you walk by. (Lone Star ticks have vision and will actually chase you...)

    Blacklegged ticks, in spite of their alternate name of deer tick, can get their blood meals from a number of animals (eg mice and humans) and do not require a local deer population.

    There are about 7 different tick-borne diseases found here in the NE. Only Lyme has the 24-hour delay before transmission--the others can be transmitted immediately upon being bitten. Thus, the only truly safe procedure it to keep them off you in the first place. (Tick inspection after getting home is helpful, but not 100%.) Permethrin on clothing and DEET on exposed skin is a good first line of defense...


    Larry Dapsis (Deer Tick Project Coordinator - Entomologist www.capecodextension.org) has given a number of talks on the topic. A video of a 2016 talk can be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A47G...ature=youtu.be (2hrs--the first hour is on mosquito protection and the second hour is on tick protection). His slides from a 2014 talk can be found at http://orleansconservationtrust.org/...esentation.pdf and more useful info from the town nurse can be found at http://www.bedfordma.gov/sites/bedfo...bout_ticks.pdf.

    Doug

    EDIT: the other name for the deer tick is the blacklegged tick, not wood tick.
    Last edited by DougPaul; 04-26-2017 at 01:00 PM.

  5. #20
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    Okay Doug you got me confused. My understanding was the Deer Tick (black legged tick) was the primary vector for Lyme. I always thought there was different variety locally called the Wood Tick (AKA the American Dog Tick that was more prevalent in southern and western maine years ago), the Deer Tick was a relative newcomer to the SW Maine and southern NH. The wood ticks I used to pick up surveying tended to be larger. The few deer ticks I encountered in PA were far smaller and in the past I have used the magnifying lens on a swiss army knife to actually identify a nymph burrowed in my skin.
    Last edited by peakbagger; 04-26-2017 at 12:18 PM.

  6. #21
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  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    Okay Doug you got me confused. My understanding was the Deer Tick (black legged tick) was the primary vector for Lyme. I always thought there was different variety locally called the Wood Tick (AKA the American Dog Tick that was more prevalent in southern and western maine years ago), the Deer Tick was a relative newcomer to the SW Maine and southern NH. The wood ticks I used to pick up surveying tended to be larger. The few deer ticks I encountered in PA were far smaller and in the past I have used the magnifying lens on a swiss army knife to actually identify a nymph burrowed in my skin.
    Sorry, my error. Blacklegged tick is correct. I have edited my original post.

    Doug

  8. #23
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    The ticks have been bad for a few years now. On mountain trails, my dog has never got one. I treat mine year round with frontline. I stopped bringing him in the woods in Southern NH a couple of years ago. Wood roads are ok, but directly into any brush in Southern NH, no thanks, same for me. My last dog got Lyme, she went limp twice, until antibiotics did the trick. We walk on the roads during the week, not worth the chance now. He is vaccinated as well. Even in the winter, he got one or two from bushes in peoples front yards, it's crazy now. I never bushwacked up north in my life, don't plan on starting now.

  9. #24
    Senior Member skiguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    The ticks have been bad for a few years now. On mountain trails, my dog has never got one. I treat mine year round with frontline. I stopped bringing him in the woods in Southern NH a couple of years ago. Wood roads are ok, but directly into any brush in Southern NH, no thanks, same for me. My last dog got Lyme, she went limp twice, until antibiotics did the trick. We walk on the roads during the week, not worth the chance now. He is vaccinated as well. Even in the winter, he got one or two from bushes in peoples front yards, it's crazy now. I never bushwacked up north in my life, don't plan on starting now.
    I was diligent brushing out my Aussie. Their coats run deep almost as if they have two coats. Those ticks can get deep in there.
    "I'm getting up and going to work everyday and I am stoked. That does not suck!"__Shane McConkey

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by sierra View Post
    The ticks have been bad for a few years now. On mountain trails, my dog has never got one. I treat mine year round with frontline. I stopped bringing him in the woods in Southern NH a couple of years ago. Wood roads are ok, but directly into any brush in Southern NH, no thanks, same for me. My last dog got Lyme, she went limp twice, until antibiotics did the trick. We walk on the roads during the week, not worth the chance now. He is vaccinated as well. Even in the winter, he got one or two from bushes in peoples front yards, it's crazy now. I never bushwacked up north in my life, don't plan on starting now.
    Define north. I have never gotten a Tick (wood or deer) north of RT2 and west of the Androscoggin River Valley. I have gotten zero ticks on white mountain bushwhacks. Where I have gotten them are down in the river valleys and at trailheads in Easton and Sandwich area. Ticks in general are far more prevalent in human impacted areas. I haven't done much bushwhacking south in the Wonalancet area but expect that TIcks may also be an issue as there is a lot of fringe habitat. Stick to the core of the whites or head to the real northern NH and expect you are good.

  11. #26
    Senior Member sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    Define north. I have never gotten a Tick (wood or deer) north of RT2 and west of the Androscoggin River Valley. I have gotten zero ticks on white mountain bushwhacks. Where I have gotten them are down in the river valleys and at trailheads in Easton and Sandwich area. Ticks in general are far more prevalent in human impacted areas. I haven't done much bushwhacking south in the Wonalancet area but expect that TIcks may also be an issue as there is a lot of fringe habitat. Stick to the core of the whites or head to the real northern NH and expect you are good.
    North= Where the 4k's start. I agree that the southern side of the Sandwich area would give me concern if I was bushwhacking, which I don't. Once you get into the conifer forest of like the Kanc area, I would not be to concerned. Definitely, not worried on the 4k trails themselves. I hike in the Belknaps some, I have high concern for that area.

  12. #27
    Senior Member DayTrip's Avatar
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    Dead leaves seem to be the major tick environment where I am in CT. I've picked up ticks in my yard in DEC after just a few minutes of walking through the leaves in the woods behind my house. Really wasn't any grass where I bushwhacked this past week. Plenty of dried up leaves though.

    In all my years of camping and hiking in NH I can count maybe 2-3 times where I found a tick crawling on me and I don't think it was ever on a hiking trail.
    NH 48 4k: 48/48; NH W48k: 46/48; NY 46: 6/46

  13. #28
    Senior Member TJsName's Avatar
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    I've been hearing that the Powassan virus could become more prominent this year too. Hadn't heard of it before. Anyone know anyone who has experienced it?
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  14. #29
    Senior Member Vermonster's Avatar
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    Thankfully (despite the media hype) Powassan is incredibly rare. Fewer than 100 cases in the last decade reported in the entire US. A good thing as 50% of patients have permanent issues after infection and 10%-15% die of the disease. Unlike Lyme, transmission can occur quickly (15 minutes). While PV can rarely infect wildlife, there are no reported cases in dogs.

    I can think of all kinds of reasons to take tick precautions. While preventing PV is pretty low on my list, it does bear watching. PV comes in two different forms (lineages). Historically lineage I was seen. This is carried by tick species that uncommonly infect humans. Recent data from NY indicates lineage II is more common there and can be transmitted by the black legged (deer) tick.

  15. #30
    Senior Member sardog1's Avatar
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    Another vote for spray-on permethrin. I spent a few hours sitting motionlessly in tick country the other day. Came home without any hitchhikers on me.
    sardog1

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